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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1797.10
Britain's Triumph,
Or the Dutch Well Dressed
Anon
The Scots Magazine, LIX (October 1797), p. 770

                    A Song.

Tune—"In the Garb of Old Gaul."

BRITANNIA still triumphs, still Queen of
                    the Main,
In defiance of Holland, of France, and of
                    Spain:
Our Duncan[1] has met them, what need we say
                    more,
He has bore Britain's thunder to Holland's
                    sad shore.

                         CHORUS.

    With such zeal in Britain's cause our gallant
                    crews unite,
    Their ancient glory to maintain, to show their
                    country's right,
    That foes may mourn in sad dispair, but Britain
                    bless the day,
    When France, with insolent disdain, threw Peace
                    far away.

Ah! cruel these Rulers, who blast every joy,
Who, boastful of Freedom, that Freedom destroy;
Who force peaceful Britons again to stand
                    forth,
To shew British courage, to shew British worth.

    With such zeal, &c.

But happy our land, with true Liberty stor'd,
And happy our land with such Heroes on board;
That Freedom we'll keep, and these Heroes we'll praise,
And high o'er the waves Britain's standard we'll raise.

    With such zeal, &c.

Ye Tyrants of France, hide your heads in dismay;
Let Holland, sad Holland, her sorrow display;
And, taught by like means, may Spain, to her cost,
Find that Old Britain's Navy is no empty boast.

    With such zeal, &c.


Notes

1. Adam Duncan, British admiral.

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Published @ RC

September 2004