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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1798.12
Ode on the late glorious Victory of
the 1st o
f August 1798
[1]
"W. Case, jun."
[William Case, Jr.][2]
The Lady's Magazine, XXIX (1798), 565

Lo! what unrivall'd trophies crown
    Britannia's happy monarch's reign!
To her brave heroes Neptune yields
    The fasces of the billowy main.

But chief, O victor of the Nile!
    To thee exultant strains we owe;
Thou, Nelson! crush'd proud Gallia's
                    power,
    And laid'st her fairest laurels low.

Thy vollied thunders, fraught with
                    death,
    With crimson stain'd the hoary waves,
Pour'd wide destruction on the foe,
    And shook old Ocean's cozy caves.

Meanwhile the setting orb of day
    Diffus'd faint streams of purple light,
And long hung glimmering in the west,
    As loth to quit the glorious fight.

Hark! hark! the shouts of victory burst,
    Aloft Britannia's streamers fly,
And show her sons will e'er remain
    Free as the western gale, that wantons
               through the sky.

Lynn, Dec. 1798


Notes

1. This is one of dozens of verses which celebrated Nelson's victory against the French in Egypt.

2. William Case, Jr., who also wrote The Minstreal's Youth; with other Poems (1801) and Pictures of British Poesy (1803).

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Published @ RC

September 2004