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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1798.16
A Fast-Day Hymn
"J. B."
The Spirit of the Public Journals, I (1798), pp. 341-342 [1]

To be sung by a chorus of Placemen, etc.

"O God, of thy goodness slay mine enemies, and destroy all them
that vex my soul; for I am thy servant."

"Although we never pray'd before,
    Yet now we're bid to pray;
To thee, O Lord, we raise our voice,
    On this most solemn day.

"Fain would we murder all our foes;
    O grant our pious wish,
For, lo! this day have we resolv'd
    To dine on salted fish.

"Oh! 'tis a goodly sound to hear
    Of tens of thousands slain,
While at a distance from the scene
    We safe at home remain.

"To thee, the God of Love and Peace,
    We pray to whet our sword:
Grant we may cut a thousand throats—
    All for thy holy word!

"O God of Mercy, grant that those
    With us who do not think,
May of the bitter cup of wrath,
    Be ever doom'd to drink!

"So shall we laud thy holy name,
    If thou wilt grant our wish;
Since 'tis for this we have resolved
    To dine on salted fish.


Notes

1. Reprinted from TheMorning Chronicle.

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Published @ RC

September 2004