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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1799.9
The Emigree
“F. A.”
The Monthly Mirror, VIII (August 1799), p. 109

The words of the song of Rosalie, sung last season by Miss Waters,
    at Covent Garden theatre, on her benefit night, are altered
    from the Emigree, a sonnet written by Mr. Frederick Atkinson;
    and in that altered state are published without his knowledge.
    The original words, in the character of Sabina, are as fol-
    lows, and have never before been published.

      My lov'd parents are gone!—alas, ne'er to return,
      And have left poor Sabina their suff'rings to mourn;
      All my friends are dispers'd, and I comfortless roam,
      Here a stranger to all—without money or home.
          Escap'd from a nation who wish'd to enslave her,
          A poor little Emigree sues for your favour!

      Once encompass'd by pleasures, and cheer'd by content,
      O'er the smooth paths of innocence joyful I went;
      In our mansion of peace, my fond parents too blest,
      Entwin'd wreaths of delight to encircle my breast.
          Escap'd from a nation who wish'd to enslave her,
          A poor little Emigree sues for your favour.

      Now no parent, no friend, no country, no home!
      All lost to Sabina—full cheerless I roam:
      In this land of fair freedom I look for the smile
      Which can soften distress, and my sorrows beguile.
          Escap'd from a nation who wish'd to enslave her,
          A poor little Emigree sues for your favour.


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Published @ RC

September 2004