1801.15 - "Impromptu, On Being Told that the Present War is for the Preservation of Property"

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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1801.15
Impromptu,
On Being Told that the Present War is for the
Preservation of Property

“Quiz”
The Spirit of the Public Journals, IV (1801), p. 393

Will dreamt that thieves his house would rob:—
"Sell all my goods," quoth he; "and, Bob,
Go, hire of watchmen many a score,
Stop ev'ry cranny, bar each door;
Ere safety's means a jot shall lack,
I'll pawn the last shirt off my back!"
He stem'd the fancied evil-doing,
But at the price of certain ruin;
For, so much cost this careful dealing,
It did not leave a stick worth stealing!


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Published @ RC

September 2004