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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1801.3
Stanzas
Anon
The Hull Packet (June 2, 1801)

To the Memory of Sir Ralph
Abercromby.[1]

       The Hero's Grave.

                    I.

Mirth, awhile thy crew restrain,
Comrades, join a soldier's tear;
Mark the sad and solemn train,
Weeping o'er their Gen'ral's bier.
Mournful sighs their grief proclaim,
Tribute to the good and brave;
Think on Abercromby's fame,
While tears bedew their Hero's grave.

                    II.

Gentle was his feeling breast,
Smiles adorn'd his manly brow;
And alone his heart depress'd,
When mourning o'er a captive foe.
Ere consign'd to parent earth,
Haste the young, the good, the brave,
Dwell on Abercromby's worth,
While tears bedew the Hero's grave.

Malta.


Notes

1. General Ralph Abercromby (1734-1801), was given command of the British troops sent to destroy the army Napoleon had left in Egypt in 1799. His army landed at Abukir Bay on March 8, 1801 and advanced toward Alexandria; the French made a surprise attack before dawn on March 21 and, though the British defeated them, Abercrombie was mortally wounded. He died aboard his flagship "Foudroyant" on March 28 and was buried at Malta.

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Published @ RC

September 2004