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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1803.11
The subjoined Verses were intended as an Anthem . . .
“T. W.”
The Gentleman's Magazine, LXXIII (November 1803), p. 1058

Mr. URBAN,                                                                                  B--n, Oct. 25.

    The subjoined Verses were intended as an Anthem for Divine Service on the last Fast-day in the two parish-churches in which I officiate; but recollecting, after I had written them, their introduction there would be an infringement on the authority of the Ordinary, they were not used. If thought fit to be preserved in the Gentleman's Magazine, you loyalty or your kindness will induce you to print then.   T.W.

         First Verse.

"God save great George," &c.

               II.

Holy Lord God arise,
Venger of perfidies,
    Father of truth!
Teach every secret foe,
Lurking in treasons low,
Teach all the earth, to know
    Thy favour's worth.

               III.

O our Defence and Shield,
When in th' ensanguin'd field
For thy great name;
    When, in thy righteous cause,
Navies of warriors rose,
Thine, Lord, and His, who shews
    Thine is the fame:

               IV.

Thou, whose Almighty Hand
Guardest this envied land
    In each dread hour;
Thou, who Invasion's host
Scatter'st on many a coast,
O be Thou still our boast;
    We own thy pow'r:

                V.

We bend beneath thy rod;
Raise us, O gracious God,
    Thy praise to sing:
Still bid thy people know,
Vain is the proudest foe,
Vain the assassin's blow,
    God saves our King!


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Published @ RC

September 2004