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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1803.4
The Oracle Consulted
“Hafiz” [1]
[Thomas Stott]
The Gentleman's Magazine, LXXIII (August 1803), p. 762
The Anti-Gallican, (1804), p. 141
The Hull Packet (July 1, 1805)

What's a Frenchman?—Slavery's fool.
What's a Briton?—Freedom'stool,
Form'd to curb despotic rule—
    Fit with any foe to cope.

What's the Frenchman's view?—Invasion
If he find a fair occasion.
What the Briton's?—Full persuasion
    That he'll blast the Frenchman's hope.

What's the Frenchman's pleasure?—Plunder,
What the Briton's?—Naval thunder,
That shall make the Frenchman wonder,
    If he dare insult our strand.

What's the end?—To Frenchmen—madness,
Disappointment, shame, and sadness:
But to Britons—Glory, gladness,
    Safety in their native land.

August, 1803.


Notes

1. Pseudonym of Thomas Stott of Dromore, Ireland.

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September 2004

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