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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1804.12
Parody
of the Song Called "The Dream."[sic.]
[1]
“Y. Y.”
The Gentleman's Magazine, LXXIV (October 1804), p. 956

    I love that drum's inspiring sound,
Parading round, and round, and round:
To patriot youths it pleasure yields;
It calls from cities and from fields
All who for Freedom nobly dare
To fill the glorious ranks of war,
And, at their Country's high command,
To march, and fight, and save their native land.

    I love that drum's inspiring sound,
Parading round, and round, and round:
To me it talks of France despis'd;
Of England's blessings justly priz'd;
Of wild assailers of our coast
Back to the sea indignant toss'd;
Of peace, tho' distant, yet by Heav'n
At length, for Britain's sake, to Europe giv'n.

York, 1804.


Notes

1. A pro-war version of John Scott's widely-reprinted The Drum, an anti-war poem published in The Cambridge Intelligencer, August 3, 1793.

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Published @ RC

September 2004

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