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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1805.5
The Mottos Translated.
A New Union Song

“B. S.”
The Gentleman's Magazine, LXXV (August 1805), p. 752

Come GEORGE and come DAVID, come ANDREW and PAT,
    To the wars now with speed let's repair;
The Rose, Thistle, and Shamrock, shall wave in each hat,
    And the Leek will not fail to be there.

Our foes with insulting bravados have dar'd
    Ev'n to threaten our peaceful retreat;
Should they come, 'tis the vanquish'd alone will be spar'd;
    But opposers must fall at our feet.

When Harry the Fifth march'd his legions to France,
    There to conquer in Agincourt's field,
'Twas then SINGLE-HANDED he dar'd to advance.
    Yet proud Gallia was forced to yield.

Now "THREE JOIN'D IN ONE"[1] is the Union we boast;
    And "WHO SHALL DIVIDE"[2] we appeal;
Whilst "I SERVE"[3] cries each hero that watches our coast;
    "Those who hurt me my vengeance shall feel."[4]

"May mischief o'ertake those who mischief intend,"[5]
Is the banner display'd to our fight;
And success will our honest endeavours attend,
When supported by "God and my right."[6]

St. George is on horse; see, he points to the plains,
Where St. Andrew leads on without fear;
St. Patrick's bold heroes the centre sustains,
And St. David's ennobles the read.


Notes

1. [Author's note]: "Tria juncta in uno."

2. [Author's note]: "Quis separabit?"

3. [Author's note]: "Ich dien."

4. [Author's note]: "Nemo me impune lacessit."

5. [Author's note]: "Honi soit qui mal y pense."

6. [Author's note]: "Dieu et mon droit."

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Published @ RC

September 2004

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