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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1807.11
The New Mariners, For 1808
"E. G."
The Morning Chronicle (December 11, 1807)

Ye Gentlemen of England, who love not foreign climes,
    How little do ye think upon the danger of these times:
Give ear unto the mariners, who briefly will explain,
    All the cares and the fears, all the cares and the fears,
While these "Men of Vigour" reign,
While these "Men of Vigour" reign,
While these "Men of Vigour" reign.

When enemies opposed us by falsehood, theft and fraud,
    We still maintain'd our honour, and Europe did applaud;
By fighting, not by piracy, our battles did we gain;[1]
    Our good name's lost to fame, our good name's lost to fame,
While these "Men of Vigour" reign,
While these, &c.

But, courage, still, brave mariners, nor ever be dismay'd,
    Altho' we want adventurers, altho' we want a trade:
Our merchant's can't employ us, to fetch them gold or gain;
    Let's not rail, but bewail—let's not rail, but bewail,
While these "Men of Vigour" reign,
While these, &c.


Notes

1. The attack on Denmark, September 1807.

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Published @ RC

September 2004