Printer-friendly versionSend by email
British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

Previous Poem    -    Next Poem

1807.4
To the Inhabitants of the British Empire,
On the present critical and singular Conjuncture
of Affairs

"Britannicus" [1]
The European Magazine, LII (July, 1807), p. 53

The CHOSEN YOUTH shall faint; the STRONG shall fall;
Bow THE HIGH TOW'R, THE FIRM-COMPACTED WALL;
But THEY who in THE LORD their trust repose,
Shall gather strength to vanquish all their foes:
Like feathers in the moulting eagle's wing,
Shall hope renew'd within their bosoms spring;
Unwearied shall they move with stedfast aim;
Nought shall THEM turn aside, or bring to shame:
THEIR GOD SHALL RISE, HIS SERVANTS' CAUSE TO PLEAD:
Their SURE PROTECTOR HE in time of need:
Let them, UNDOUBTING, on HIS AID rely,
Nor fear the failure of the wish'd supply.
                                   ISAIAH, chap. xl
             Paraphrased by BRITANNICUS.

July 14, 1807.


Notes

1. A letter to the editor from the author carries the following statement:"The enemy is indeed now become paramount lord of all Europe, excepting the British Islands; and of all Asia, excepting India, China, and Japan: yet is the strength of the British empire unimpair'd, and capable of opposing his colossal power, with every prospect of success, while acting on the defensive."

Previous Poem    -    Next Poem

Published @ RC

September 2004