1811.7 - "The Dying Patriot"

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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1811.7
The Dying Patriot
“W. C**E.”
The Poetical Magazine, IV (1811), p. 207

Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori. HOR.[1]

When, rous'd into arms at the voice of the State,
    His sword the bold Patriot draws,
How bright is the lustre that shines on his fate,
    If destin'd to sink in her cause!

While the eyes of the hero are closing in death,
    How graceful, how sweet, is the scene!
Encircled with glory, he yields up his breath;
    'Mid the tortures of anguish, serene.

Oh! mark to each feature what radiance is given
    As he drops on the verge of the grave!
'Tis the sunset of valour, the day-spring of heaven,
    The triumph that waits on the brave!


Notes

1. "It is sweet and proper to die for one's country."

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Published @ RC

September 2004