1813.1 - "The Apes: A Fable from the Italian"

Printer-friendly versionSend by email
British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

Previous Poem    -    Next Poem

1813.1
The Apes:
A Fable from the Italian

“E. R.”
The Monthly Magazine, XXXIV (January 1, 1813), pp. 523-524
The Morning Chronicle (January 2, 1813)

In a charming balcony o'er-shaded with trees,
In the court of a palace, an ape liv'd at ease;
And treasures, not jewels nor gold, she possess'd,
In a bag-full of walnuts supremely was bless'd.
Other monkeys press'd round for a savoury meal,
But she kept all the kernels and threw them the peal;
In vain ev'ry art, each intreaty, they try'd,
Till the place of remonstrance stern fury supply'd;
To keep at a distance her terrible foes
From her bag of dear walnuts, she levell'd her blows;
A long, long, and wearisome war she maintain'd,
And, thankful to Fortune, the victory gained.
But, turning her eyes, her rich bag to explore,
Every walnut was lost in defending the store.
    Oh! war-waging Britain! protectress of Spain
    Thy courage how dauntless! thy glory how vain!

C--N.


Previous Poem    -    Next Poem

Published @ RC

September 2004

Country