Forthcoming Resources

Electronic Editions
An Uninteresting Detail of a Journey to Rome

by Flaxman, Ann

Ann Flaxman's An Uninteresting Detail of a Journey to Rome tells the story of a female Grand Tour, something quite rare, and of an extended artist's visit to Italy, something quite common. In 1787 Flaxman set out for France and Italy with her husband, the sculptor John Flaxman, and a small company of fellow travellers. During her journey and in the months that followed her arrival in Rome, Flaxman kept a perceptive and entertaining journal for the benefit of friends at home, a group that included William and Catherine Blake. Personal yet nonetheless typical of its genre, Flaxman's previously unpublished Journey serves as an excellent introduction to English travel writing just before the French Revolution, and to the late-eighteenth-century international arts scene. It also reveals the challenges and rewards of being an atypically poor traveller and an aspiring woman writer.
Edited by
McAllister, Marie E.
Praxis Series
Stanley Cavell and the Event of Romanticism
Through a variety of perspectives ranging over the last fifty years of his work, this volume addresses American philosopher Stanley Cavell’s criticism of British Romantics and the stakes of British Romanticism in his work. These essays carve out Cavell’s American project as much as possible, while at the same time marking the cost of doing so in a larger contextualization of his—and romanticism’s—current inheritance. Edited and with an introduction by Eric Lindstrom, and featuring essays by Eric Lindstrom, Paul H. Fry, Anne-Lise François, Eric C. Walker, and Emily Sun, and an afterword by Joshua Wilner.
Edited by
Lindstrom, Eric
Electronic Editions
Fables Ancient and Modern, by Edward Baldwin, Esq.

by Godwin, William

While literary historians have long been aware that radical author William Godwin wrote and published children's books, these works are substantially less visible than his novels and philosophical writings, either from the works' inaccessibility or misidentification or from the vicissitudes of scholarship. This deficiency is all the more striking when we consider that Godwin's children's books (both the ones he wrote and the ones he published) were popular in their own time and remained so even after his business crumbled. The profound cultural impact of Godwin's children's literature—especially as an expression of his social politics—necessitates their reproduction and welcomes further critical inquiry.

This first installment of a complete critical edition of Godwin’s ten contributions to his Juvenile Library makes available for the first time since 1824 the first text that Godwin both authored and published under his own imprint, Fables Ancient and Modern. Adapted for the Use of Children from Three to Eight Years of Age (1805), along with a comprehensive introduction and extensive notes by the editors.

Critical editions of Godwin’s nine other Juvenile Library titles—texts both rare and, as a result, heretofore largely inaccessible to students and scholars—are also forthcoming.

Edited by
Barnett, Suzanne L.; Gustafson, Katherine Bennett
Praxis Series
Tragedy, Translation and Theory: In Honor of the Work of Thomas J. McCall
This issue takes its inspiration from the writings on translation, tragedy and twentieth century literary theory in the work of the late romanticist and comparatist Tom McCall, who died suddenly in January 2011. Three noted Romanticists and literary theorists, taking off from specific critical essays by McCall, explore the centrality of Greek tragedy as it emerges in romantic writing (especially that of Friedrich Hölderlin), for philosophy, literature and literary theory. Passing between the Greek and the German (notably in Hölderlin’s translations of Sophocles), and between the literary and the philosophical, these papers offer new and original insights into the complex ways in which romantic writing was bound to the translation and interpretation of Greek writing and the unique manner in which 20th century literary theory emerged from the romantic reflection on the relation between language and the emergence (and suspension) of thought.
Edited by
Caruth, Cathy
Pedagogies
Translation Theory / Pedagogical Practice: Teaching Romantic Translation(s)
As we enter into the new century’s teenage years, we have witnessed translation studies migrate from its position as "a backwater of the university"—to cite Lawrence Venuti—to becoming a central object of scholarly enquiry in literary and cultural studies and beyond. But while numerous research outlets have been and are being organized around the topic, course readings in English literature have, generally speaking, not yet come to reflect the same transformative impulse. In diverse ways, the scholars collected in this volume make compelling cases for expanding the repertoire of texts worthy of study in English classrooms to include translations. Edited and introduced by C.C. Wharram, with essays by Aishah Alshatti, Daniel DeWispelare, Gillian Dow, Lesa Scholl, Valerie Henitiuk, and C.C. Wharram.
Edited by
Wharram, C.C.
Electronic Editions
Verses Transcribed for H.T.

by Tighe, Mary

Published here for the first time, Verses Transcribed for H.T. is a manuscript collection of 121 original lyric poems with 72 original illustrations that Mary Tighe prepared in 1805 as she was contemplating publishing a volume of poetry that would feature her epic romance "Psyche; or, the Legend of Love" accompanied by a selection of her lyrics. Instead she opted to print 50 copies of Psyche; or, The Legend of Love (London, 1805) without any additions from Verses in a small private edition that she dedicated and distributed to family and friends (her only publication). After she died her family published Psyche, with Other Poems (London, 1811), which offered a carefully culled and re-ordered selection of 29 lyrics from Verses (with 10 additional lyrics).

Verses Transcribed for H.T. provides a truly unique opportunity to see Tighe as the determining editor of her own collected poems. Organized in deliberate clusters, Verses is a self-consciously constructed aesthetic artifact that radically revises prior knowledge of Tighe's literary, visual, and material production: 65 of the 121 poems had not appeared in any known print sources as of yet; 17 of the 121 poems contain significant variants from the published versions; at least 15 of the poems are written in the voice of characters from Tighe's 1803 manuscript novel Selena, versus the 11 that are printed in the novel; dozens attest to Tighe's full-scale engagement with contemporary poetics and politics: the discourse of sensibility, Della Cruscan poetry, coterie culture, the sonnet revival, Romantic antiquarianism, the 1794 Treason Trials, the 1798 Irish Rebellion, the 1801 Act of Union, and more.

This edition contains a comprehensive introduction by the editor, a fully annotated and searchable transcription of the manuscript, and digital images of the manuscript pages, made available through the kind courtesy of the National Library of Ireland.

Edited by
Linkin, Harriet Kramer
Praxis Series
Romantic Materialities
The six essays collected here suggest that Romanticism exposes us to a materialism that cannot merely be overcome and an idealism with which it is not identical. By reading beyond the texts conventionally associated with Romanticism, and by recasting the critical tendencies–from thing theory to object oriented ontology–through the poets, genres, and critics of Romanticism, these essays position Romanticism (and show how Romanticism may always have been positioned) in another relation to things as they are–or may be.
Edited by
Guyer, Sara; Langan, Celeste
Praxis Series
Visuality's Romantic Genealogies
This volume is dedicated to both excavating the romantic genealogies of visuality and charting directions for the ways in which the study of romantic visual culture may redraw the geographic, temporal, and disciplinary bounds of romanticism, bringing diverse, and in some instances new, objects and their ethical, political, and aesthetic stakes into view. The essays investigate three broad inquiries: 1) technologies of vision and objectivity’s slippages; 2) the indigenous or transplanted fruits of visuality’s New World Genealogies and 3) the role of proto-photography, panopticism and slavery in the spectral formation of romantic visuality. Emphasizing the ways we interpret visuality in romantic culture, the volume invites further consideration of future thoughts about media, practices, and discourses that would seem to belong to earlier and to later periods—from the artifacts and modes of viewing attached to the curiosity to the technologies and discourses leading up to what we call photography and the digital.
Edited by
Kelley, Theresa M.; Casid, Jill H.
Electronic Editions
Wordsworth's Guide to the Lakes

by Wordsworth, William

In the two centuries since its initial publication, Wordsworth’s Guide to the Lakes (as it has generally come to be known) has attracted its share of enthusiasts. Despite receiving warm praise in high places, the Guide has never been what one might call a bestseller. In the thirty-seven years after it first appeared as a stand-alone volume in 1822, it enjoyed steady, if not brisk, sales. Then, rather inexplicably—especially given Wordsworth’s popularity among the Victorians—the book essentially vanished, being republished only in collected works editions between 1859 and the Ernest De Sélincourt edition of 1906. While the availability of the text itself is happily no longer an issue, those seeking a modern, comprehensive, annotated edition have generally been out of luck. This edition features an introduction by the editors, page images from the original publication, and a mapping feature that illustrates the locations Wordsworth discusses herein in their historic geographical context.
Edited by
Hall, Billy M.; Westover, Paul; McDonald, Jarom; Mason, Nicholas A.; Stimpson, Shannon