The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six
New Work on German Romanticism
Teaching Romanticism and Literary Theory, edited by Brian McGrath

This special issue explores the notion that many of the forms, ideas, and practices inaugurated or exemplified in the Romantic period continue to shape and drive our contemporary discourses. Literary critics, cultural and political theorists, and, indeed, our students continue to encounter new permutations—if not the continued presence—of something that might be called the romantic...

The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six
Based on extensive new archival research, The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six: 1819 to 1821 brings together for the first time Southey’s surviving letters from a period of turbulence and transition in his own life and in wider society. The 546 letters published here are testimony to Southey’s formidable energy and commitment to letter writing as a vehicle for social...

Is Romantic prose a neutral instrument of representation? Does it struggle to engage questions of experience and sensation in new ways? How should prose be understood in relation to poetic expressiveness? The essays in this volume explore Romantic prose across multiple genres as a kind of performative utterance that redraws the boundaries between the private and the social.

New Work on German Romanticism
“What’s new with German Romanticism?” – the question gestures to the important contribution of German-language writing to our understanding of the period but also to the trenchant and suggestive interrogation of the category of “newness” by German Romantic writers. The essays in this collection represent some of the most important current trends in scholarship, but each also grapples in some way...
Teaching Romanticism and Literary Theory, edited by Brian McGrath

These essays reflect on the ways contributors integrate literary theory into their teaching of Romanticism and reflect on the continued importance of literary theory to Romanticism and the work of Romanticists. Collectively the essays broach a range of questions, but perhaps most importantly: why teach Romanticism and literary theory today? How does teaching Romanticism with literary theory...

Newest Resources

This special issue explores the notion that many of the forms, ideas, and practices inaugurated or exemplified in the Romantic period continue to shape and drive our contemporary discourses. Literary critics, cultural and political theorists, and...

April 2017
Based on extensive new archival research, The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six: 1819 to 1821 brings together for the first time Southey’s surviving letters from a period of turbulence and transition in his own life and in wider...
March 2017

Is Romantic prose a neutral instrument of representation? Does it struggle to engage questions of experience and sensation in new ways? How should prose be understood in relation to poetic expressiveness? The essays in this volume explore...

February 2017
“What’s new with German Romanticism?” – the question gestures to the important contribution of German-language writing to our understanding of the period but also to the trenchant and suggestive interrogation of the category of “newness” by German...
December 2016
This volume brings together essays from Japan, China, Taiwan, and Korea to offer an unprecedented view of English Romanticism’s presence in the modern literature and literary criticism of East Asia. Going beyond simply tracing the influence of...
December 2016

These essays reflect on the ways contributors integrate literary theory into their teaching of Romanticism and reflect on the continued importance of literary theory to Romanticism and the work of Romanticists. Collectively the essays broach a...

December 2016

News & Announcements from the RC Community

Rousseau’s Women << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
10 months 2 weeks ago
bust of Rousseau Rousseau’s writings are often regarded as contradictory. In his life, he was attacked as a hypocrite who wrote of the duties and obligations of the citizen but who himself lived in exile from society. The structuralist critic Tzvetan Todorov has been more generous to Rousseau, arguing that he self-consciously inhabits different perspectives in order to capture a contradiction “in... See full post (external link)
Presence/Absence as Problem & Possibility in “On The Medusa of Leonardo Da Vinci” and ODESZA << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
10 months 3 weeks ago
In October, I found myself facing a new problem in the interpretation of music, with broader implications for the engagement and understanding of the arts generally. It has taken this long to begin to work it out. Then, I saw the contemporary indie electronica group ODESZA. The show was amazing. Yet, it yielded a profound sense of vertigo, the kind we all sense, and become been sensitized to, in... See full post (external link)
Greetings from the New Managing Editor! << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
11 months 3 weeks ago
Hello, everyone As Arden mentioned in her Farewell Editorial, she will soon defend her dissertation and is therefore stepping down as Managing Editor of the NGSC Blog. It has been my pleasure to write for the blog for the past year or so, and I must thank Arden for the opportunity to do that and to follow in her footsteps as the blog’s editor. We’ll continue to publish posts... See full post (external link)
Farewell Editorial << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
11 months 4 weeks ago
Dear colleagues and friends, It has been a tremendous pleasure to serve as the NASSR Graduate Student Caucus Blog editor since the Autumn of 2014. I have been privileged to read the work of many wonderful writers, who have each lent their distinctive approach to the study of Romanticism. We have been lucky to have had a Poet and an Artist in Residence, an art historian with a specialization in... See full post (external link)
‘Spectacular Suffering’: A Reading Recommendation << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
12 months 1 day ago
Professor Ramesh Mallipeddi’s course, ‘slavery and eighteenth-century literature,’ which I took a year ago, was an opportunity to consider questions central to slavery studies: What is the role of the critic in relation to the archive of slavery, where there are very few accounts of slave experience written by slaves themselves? Did the affective politics of sympathy... See full post (external link)
Spinoza with Wordsworth: substance and “the life of things” << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 year 1 month ago
Like many readers of this blog, I’ve been spending a lot of time with Wordsworth lately. As all who’ve read the “The Prelude” know, “nature” is really important to the developmental trajectory that Wordsworth traces in recursive manner throughout the various versions of the poem. It’s hard to say, however, what exactly Wordsworth’s concept of nature is. The relation between the... See full post (external link)

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