NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award
Teaching Jane Austen
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials, and a panel of...

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on the other, to press the limits of the Gothic down to their most basic foundations, releasing new potentials. These essays all argue in different way...

This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates a potential binary in our understanding of Shelley's "interventionist" work: the "antinomy of commitment and autonomy." Asking what it means for a...

The new Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions section is an innovative venture in contemporary Romantic scholarship, comprising short reviews of recent work, live BookChats, BookLists, a forum for debate, and an evolving compendium of appearances of Romanticism in popular culture.

Teaching Jane Austen
The essays collected here describe curricular ideas, innovations, and practices that seek to move us beyond simple questions of Austen’s accessibility, relevance, and context. The contributors ask how we might enrich the teaching of Austen’s fiction by seeing her in conversation with manuscript culture, children’s literature, Harry Potter, or Romantic poetry. Collectively, these essays look to...

Newest Resources

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional...
December 2015

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on...

November 2015
This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates...
October 2015

The new Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions section is an innovative venture in contemporary Romantic scholarship, comprising short reviews of recent work, live BookChats, BookLists, a forum for debate, and an evolving compendium of...

September 2015
First published in 1810 and then revised over three decades, Wordsworth’s Guide has long been recognized as a crucial text for students of Romantic-era landscape aesthetics, ecology, travel writing, and tourism. The Romantic Circles edition...
April 2015
The essays collected here describe curricular ideas, innovations, and practices that seek to move us beyond simple questions of Austen’s accessibility, relevance, and context. The contributors ask how we might enrich the teaching of Austen’s fiction...
April 2015

News & Announcements from the RC Community

Carlyle Letters Online now available on NINES << NINES News
1 week 5 days ago
We are excited to announce that the Carlyle Letters Online project (CLO) is now available on NINES. CLO offers users a unique perspective on the 19th century through the words of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. On the CLO site you can browse over 10,000 of the Carlyles’ collected letters by date, recipient, subject, and volume. NINES and CLO invite you to explore a correspondence featuring... << Read full post (external link)
“The world’s first instant mashed potato factory,” and other Romantic-era food innovations << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 week 5 days ago
As a lover of anecdotes in a field (English) that doesn’t always embrace them in its scholarship, I often come upon delightful details I want to share, but can’t—in my dissertation, at least. So, it makes me especially happy to have the opportunity to write for this blog, as I get the chance to relate all the fun facts I’ve been learning in my food studies-related reading. Today, I’m expanding... Read full post (external link)
Five Great Things about Alan Rickman’s Colonel Brandon in Ang Lee’s Sense & Sensibility (1995) << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
2 weeks 1 hour ago
The actor Alan Rickman passed away on January 14, 2016. He played many roles—most people probably know him best as Severus Snape in the Harry Potter movies—but to me, he will always be Colonel Brandon, a role he played brilliantly in Ang Lee’s Sense and Sensibility (1995). The film departs from the novel in many ways, as all adaptations do, but it remains one of my... Read full post (external link)
Blake Quarterly winter issue << The Cynic Sang
2 weeks 3 days ago
Our winter issue (vol. 49, no. 3) has just been published. It contains: Joseph Fletcher, “Ocean Growing: Blake’s Two Versions of Newton and the Emerging Polypus” Sibylle Erle, review of Colin Trodd, Visions of Blake: William Blake in the Art World 1830-1930 Robert N. Essick and Jenijoy La Belle, “The Blakes at Their Press” Angus Whitehead, “‘a bite’: The First... << Read full post (external link)
New Initiative: Romantic Bicentennials! << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
3 weeks 3 days ago
I’m pleased to announce a new initiative sponsored by the Keats-Shelley Association of America and the Byron Society of America: ROMANTIC BICENTENNIALS! This project offers scholars, readers, and the general public the opportunity to get involved and to receive updates about annual symposia, related conferences,  networked events, and other media celebrating 200 years of Romanticism. The... Read full post (external link)
Romanticism & the Abstract: Finding the Sublime 20th c. American-Avant Garde Art << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
3 weeks 6 days ago
Happy new year Romantics and all readers alike! The promises of the title carry the weight of a dissertation title rather than a blog post, so to focus such reflections I write in response to an exhibit I recently visited at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. “Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933–1957” has recently and consistently been hailed as one of the best exhibitions... Read full post (external link)

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