NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award
The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it is to provide a single theoretical perspective with which to view those authors. Instead, the essays collectively convey a sense that Romantic writers...
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials, and a panel of...

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on the other, to press the limits of the Gothic down to their most basic foundations, releasing new potentials. These essays all argue in different way...

This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates a potential binary in our understanding of Shelley's "interventionist" work: the "antinomy of commitment and autonomy." Asking what it means for a...

The new Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions section is an innovative venture in contemporary Romantic scholarship, comprising short reviews of recent work, live BookChats, BookLists, a forum for debate, and an evolving compendium of appearances of Romanticism in popular culture.

Newest Resources

The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it...
March 2016

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional...
December 2015

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on...

November 2015
This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates...
October 2015

The new Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions section is an innovative venture in contemporary Romantic scholarship, comprising short reviews of recent work, live BookChats, BookLists, a forum for debate, and an evolving compendium of...

September 2015
First published in 1810 and then revised over three decades, Wordsworth’s Guide has long been recognized as a crucial text for students of Romantic-era landscape aesthetics, ecology, travel writing, and tourism. The Romantic Circles edition...
April 2015

News & Announcements from the RC Community

In Defense of Mr. Byron << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
2 weeks 4 days ago
The boys of the newly formed Dead Poets’ Society are holding one of their weekly meetings (except Knox Overstreet, who’s at a party trying to talk to the girl of his dreams) when there’s a sound—the likes of which strikes terror into the hearts of teenage boys: a girl’s laughter.  Charlie leads them in, offers them cigarettes, while the rest of the group stares on in... See full post (external link)
Juxta and Frankenstein in the Classroom << NINES News
2 weeks 4 days ago
In case you missed it, NINES’s digital collation tool Juxta got a shout-out from Tawnya Ravy on the Studies in the Novel website. As Tawnya explains, “Scholarly editions of [Frankenstein] often include the 1818 preface and 1831 introduction as paratexts for understanding the authorial background of the text, and Juxta allows students to verify Shelley’s claims about... See full post (external link)
The Strange Unknowns of Spell-checking Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly << The Cynic Sang
3 weeks 16 hours ago
As Adam explained in last week’s post, the most recent task for many project assistants has been to search out misspelled words across extant Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly issues and make emendations where needed. While Microsoft Word provides the first indication of potential errors, we proceed line-by-line through wordlists and judge whether a word is actually misspelled or is... See full post (external link)
Revenue Stamps on Receipts << The Cynic Sang
3 weeks 2 days ago
One of our most recent projects is the transcription of 44 receipts written and signed by William Blake. They present a few new problems, such as how to transcribe the markings between numbers — their version of a decimal point, which looks a lot like two commas. Another unique aspect is the stamp, which appears on 19 of the receipts. Initially there was uncertainty over how to classify the... See full post (external link)
Gothic Poetry << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
3 weeks 4 days ago
We scholars of Romantic Gothic usually focus our attention on the Gothic novel, and indeed, the novel is what most people think of as Gothic literature. Gothic poetry has received surprisingly little critical attention. A search of the MLA International Bibliography for “gothic novel” yields 1052 results, for example; a search for “gothic poetry” yields 25. I wrote about a few of the poems I... See full post (external link)
“Swift winged words”: the vocabulary and word distribution of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly << The Cynic Sang
3 weeks 6 days ago
In the process of preparing the team to correct spelling errors in the digital archive of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly (errors in the transcription and in the original print version), I have made a few interesting observations about word distribution in the BIQ corpus (before the first online issues). On the principle that misspellings occur less frequently than correct spellings, I used a... See full post (external link)

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