Romantic Circles Pedagogies Hangouts
Romantic Circles Pedagogies Hangouts
Romantic Circles Pedagogies Hangouts brings together Romanticists and other scholars to discuss the issues of the day in Romantic literary studies and in academia at large. 

This collection thinks the “rights” of the negative against the more common association of the term “rights” with human rights and rights that can be posited. Such rights, despite their seeming liberalism, produce a normative notion of the person which is in the end biopolitical, and moreover, in assuming that rights can always be posited, they assume the primacy of the public sphere. The...

This electronic edition makes available the works of the mostly unknown late-eighteenth-century poet and teacher Catherine Upton, including The Siege of Gibraltar (1781), an epistolary prose narrative, and Miscellaneous Pieces (1784), a collection of poetry and prose. These two works appear to represent the whole of Upton’s small oeuvre, and they contribute to both the body...

This collection grows out of a 2014 conference panel at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), in which five of our six authors shared their varied experiences leading study-abroad courses and field schools to various parts of England and France. These experiences ranged from do-it-yourself plans to full partnerships with third-party organizers, with a similar range...

This special issue explores the notion that many of the forms, ideas, and practices inaugurated or exemplified in the Romantic period continue to shape and drive our contemporary discourses. Literary critics, cultural and political theorists, and, indeed, our students continue to encounter new permutations—if not the continued presence—of something that might be called the romantic...

Newest Resources

Pedagogies Hangouts is a multimedia series that brings together scholars and teachers o

July 2017

This collection thinks the “rights” of the negative against the more common association of the term “rights” with human rights and rights that can be posited. Such rights, despite their seeming liberalism, produce a normative notion of the person...

June 2017

This electronic edition makes available the works of the mostly unknown late-eighteenth-century poet and teacher Catherine Upton, including The Siege of Gibraltar (1781), an epistolary prose narrative, and Miscellaneous Pieces (...

June 2017

This collection grows out of a 2014 conference panel at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), in which five of our six authors shared their varied experiences leading study-abroad courses and field schools to various...

May 2017

This special issue explores the notion that many of the forms, ideas, and practices inaugurated or exemplified in the Romantic period continue to shape and drive our contemporary discourses. Literary critics, cultural and political theorists, and...

April 2017
Based on extensive new archival research, The Collected Letters of Robert Southey, Part Six: 1819 to 1821 brings together for the first time Southey’s surviving letters from a period of turbulence and transition in his own life and in wider...
March 2017

News & Announcements from the RC Community

“‘[I]f mine had been the Painter’s hand’: Reflecting on the Holidays in a Time of Mourning” << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
6 months 2 weeks ago
William Wordsworth opens “Elegiac Stanzas” (1807) by looking at George Beaumont’s Peele Castle in a Storm (1805) and admitting that he naïvely idealized nature and life prior to his brother John’s death—that “deep distress [which] hath humaniz’d [his] Soul” (36). Wordsworth states that he deceived himself about the reality of “thou rugged Pile” (1) so much that, if his “had been the... See full post (external link)
How much history? << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
6 months 3 weeks ago
At CUNY, a New York state public university where I teach an introductory course in literature and writing, undergraduates like thinking about power. Their material disadvantages make social critique come naturally. Knowing this and wanting to get them hooked, I present Romantic literature as an early expression of dissatisfaction with social processes and conventions, a perspective to be... See full post (external link)
Pride and Prejudice and Politics << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
7 months 5 days ago
As we march ahead, perhaps forebodingly, into a new epoch in America’s political climate, one might wonder exactly what can be the value of teaching Romantic poetry and prose. In the weeks immediately following the recent historic election (however one chooses to define “historic”), we must consider whether undergraduate students really want to spend their time reading Wordsworth’s “A slumber did... See full post (external link)
Romantic Landscapes, Part II << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
7 months 3 weeks ago
I was lucky enough, during one of the few trips I made into London from the West Country via rail, to catch a musical performance of Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner by the Trad Academy Sea Shanty Choir at historic Wilton’s Music Hall. The show was at 7:30 pm on 15 July, a Saturday; and because the last train back to Templecombe would leave Waterloo Station at... See full post (external link)
NASSR 2016 – Progressive Pedagogies << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
11 months 1 week ago
One of the last panel slots of NASSR 2016 was reserved for a roundtable with contestants of the Romantic Circles‘s Pedagogy Contest, hosted by RC Pedagogies editor Kate Singer. This year’s competition featured these finalists: Simon Bainbridge (Lancaster University) – “Wordsworth Online and On Location: Teaching Romantic Writing Beyond the Literature Classroom” Michelle Levy (... See full post (external link)
NASSR 2016: Rapid Response – Final Day! << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
11 months 1 week ago
So here we are, at the end of NASSR 2016, with all of us likely traveling across the U.S. and Canada this evening, or on our way across the Atlantic or Pacific, heading back to our home institutions. Hopefully we’re re-invigorated with an exceptional amount of insight, inspiration, and innovation that will carry into our research and teaching over this coming academic year. For me, today... See full post (external link)

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