NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award
The Collected Letters of Robert Southey Part 3
Featuring essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism, this volume sheds new light on Romanticism's material and visual cultures. Romantic Antiquarianism reveals the important role that antiquarian discourses and practices played in shaping neoclassicism, the sublime, and other major concepts of the Romantic period. Edited and introduced by...
An Island in the Moon is an incomplete manuscript written in pen and ink in Blake’s hand. It contains the earliest extant drafts of "Nurse’s Song," "Holy Thursday," and "The Little Boy Lost," which make their first published appearance in his Songs of Innocence (1789). Topical allusions and the history of Blake’s associations with the London social circle of the Rev. A. S....
In the interview that comprises this volume, Anne Mellor recounts her determined commitment to rethinking Romanticism through the lens of gender. On the eve of retirement, Mellor continues to query our assumptions and preoccupations as Romanticists, even as she looks back on her long career. The audio clips attached to the transcription resonate with Mellor’s intellectual curiosity, as her voice...
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award
The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials, and a panel of three to four finalists are selected to discuss their pedagogy during a panel at the...
The Collected Letters of Robert Southey Part 3
Part Three is the first-ever collected edition of the surviving letters written by Southey between 1804 and 1809. The letters published here begin with Southey writing to his brother with a draft of his epic poem Madoc; they end on New Year’s Eve 1809, with him discussing Coleridge’s The Friend and his own new writing in the Quarterly...

Newest Resources

Featuring essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism, this volume sheds new light on Romanticism's material and visual cultures. Romantic Antiquarianism reveals the important role that antiquarian...
June 2014
An Island in the Moon is an incomplete manuscript written in pen and ink in Blake’s hand. It contains the earliest extant drafts of "Nurse’s Song," "Holy Thursday," and "The Little Boy Lost," which make their first published appearance in...
April 2014
In the interview that comprises this volume, Anne Mellor recounts her determined commitment to rethinking Romanticism through the lens of gender. On the eve of retirement, Mellor continues to query our assumptions and preoccupations as Romanticists...
January 2014
The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  ...
November 2013
Part Three is the first-ever collected edition of the surviving letters written by Southey between 1804 and 1809. The letters published here begin with Southey writing to his brother with a draft of his epic poem...
August 2013

Part Four, covering the period 1810-1815, was a crucial one for Southey’s career and reputation. It has, however, never before been fully documented or fully understood. By 1810 he was established in Keswick...

August 2013

News & Announcements from the RC Community

Publication Announcement – Works related to Blake’s illustrations to Robert Blair’s The Grave << The Cynic Sang
1 month 2 weeks ago
The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of fully searchable and scalable electronic editions of the following works related to Blake’s development of his illustrations to Robert Blair’s The Grave: Preliminary Sketches for Robert Blair’s The Grave, listed under Drawings and Paintings, Pencil Sketches. Preliminary Drawings for Robert Blair’s The Grave, listed under... << Read full post (external link)
A Transcription Puzzle: “then She bore Pale desire”, Part 2 << The Cynic Sang
1 month 3 weeks ago
The other week, I posted an entry concerning my transcription of a set of manuscript pages beginning “then She bore Pale desire”. At the bottom of one of the pages, what seems to be an abbreviation is written in pencil marks that have either faded over time or were initially written with a series of light strokes. Here’s the image again: My initial guess was “EscS.”.   However, I was not... << Read full post (external link)
Roundtable: “Three Ways of Looking at Romantic Anatomy” << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 month 3 weeks ago
Introduction Emily, Laura, and Arden are three graduate students who share interests in Romantic medical science and anatomy. We illustrate our contrasting methods in responding to this article (“Corpses and Copyrights”), which discusses the history of dissection in England through pictures of a medical textbook, William Cowper’s Myotomia reformata, or A New Administration of... Read full post (external link)
Book Traces in The Atlantic << NINES News
1 month 3 weeks ago
There was a surge of new book submissions last week for booktraces.org! No better time to check out the recent and great article on the project in The Atlantic. Help us expand the search! We might never know about the treasures in our libraries without your help. << Read full post (external link)
The Scholar between (The Limits of) Life and Politics << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 month 3 weeks ago
This year, I went vegan. This past week, the ethical and environmental consequences of my veganism became profoundly challenged. In what follows, I use my experience as a scholar invested in animal studies and animal rights to begin exploring the meaning and tensions involved in the cultivation of an orientation where scholarship and the politics of everyday life become intertwined. I do so... Read full post (external link)
The Desert: Spirit of Place and Encountering the Dream << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 month 3 weeks ago
“A work can be as powerful as it can be thought to be. Actual space is intrinsically more powerful and specific than paint on a flat surface. ” -Donald Judd My notions about the desert seem a distant and beguiling set of imaginary scenes: as a woman-child of swamp and humid coast, enclosed by longleaf pines and surrounded by ocean on (almost) all sides, the desert seems a fairytale... Read full post (external link)

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