This is the first installment of a complete critical edition of Godwin’s ten contributions to his Juvenile Library. It makes available for the first time since 1824 the first text that Godwin both authored and published under his own imprint, Fables Ancient and Modern. Adapted for the Use of Children from Three to Eight Years of Age (1805), along with a comprehensive introduction and...

The American philosopher Stanley Cavell arrives at the striking conclusion that “romanticism opens with the discovery of the problem of other minds, or with the discovery that the other is a problem, an opening of philosophy.” Cavell’s account of how Romanticism opens is not historical in orientation, but rather offers a rich conceptual, aesthetic, and ethical site of concern that both interrupts...
Featuring essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism, this volume sheds new light on Romanticism's material and visual cultures. Romantic Antiquarianism reveals the important role that antiquarian discourses and practices played in shaping neoclassicism, the sublime, and other major concepts of the Romantic period. Edited and introduced by...
An Island in the Moon is an incomplete manuscript written in pen and ink in Blake’s hand. It contains the earliest extant drafts of "Nurse’s Song," "Holy Thursday," and "The Little Boy Lost," which make their first published appearance in his Songs of Innocence (1789). Topical allusions and the history of Blake’s associations with the London social circle of the Rev. A. S....
In the interview that comprises this volume, Anne Mellor recounts her determined commitment to rethinking Romanticism through the lens of gender. On the eve of retirement, Mellor continues to query our assumptions and preoccupations as Romanticists, even as she looks back on her long career. The audio clips attached to the transcription resonate with Mellor’s intellectual curiosity, as her voice...

Newest Resources

The American philosopher Stanley Cavell arrives at the striking conclusion that “romanticism opens with the discovery of the problem of other minds, or with the discovery that the other is a problem, an opening of philosophy.” Cavell’s account of...
July 2014

This is the first installment of a complete critical edition of Godwin’s ten contributions to his Juvenile Library. It makes available for the first time since 1824 the first text that Godwin both authored and published under his own imprint,...

July 2014
Featuring essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism, this volume sheds new light on Romanticism's material and visual cultures. Romantic Antiquarianism reveals the important role that antiquarian...
June 2014
An Island in the Moon is an incomplete manuscript written in pen and ink in Blake’s hand. It contains the earliest extant drafts of "Nurse’s Song," "Holy Thursday," and "The Little Boy Lost," which make their first published appearance in...
April 2014
In the interview that comprises this volume, Anne Mellor recounts her determined commitment to rethinking Romanticism through the lens of gender. On the eve of retirement, Mellor continues to query our assumptions and preoccupations as Romanticists...
January 2014
The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  ...
November 2013

News & Announcements from the RC Community

A Defense of Blake’s “Catalogue” and Descriptive Criticism << The Cynic Sang
1 month 3 weeks ago
By Margaret Speer In her May 14 post, “Blake’s ‘Catalogue’ and Descriptive Criticism,” my colleague and fellow undergraduate project assistant, Megan, impugned Blake, suggesting that his tone in the Descriptive Catalogue evinces a character somewhere on a spectrum between ridiculous and certifiable. I would like to offer a different response to, if not impression of, Mr. B’s insane... << Read full post (external link)
Archival Research: The Poetic Personalities Of Keats And His Circle << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 month 3 weeks ago
May 3, 2014: Keats and His Circle Conference participants on Hampstead Heath. Not all of us, but quite a few! Hello and happy summer!  Since I last blogged, I passed my Ph.D. comprehensive exams and spent two weeks in England.  I presented at the Keats and his Circle conference along with my fellow blogger, Arden Hegele, and of course the conference was everything a Keatsian (or Romanticist)... Read full post (external link)
This Day In Blake History: Gossip! << The Cynic Sang
1 month 4 weeks ago
Over the past year, the Archive’s publication of existing Blake letters has offered a unique perspective on the personal history of Blake, which complements the view his professional character through his numerous illustrations and engravings. To this point, the Blake Archive has published two batches of letters, with a third on the way in the coming months. Working with and reading the... << Read full post (external link)
New Peer-Reviewed Resource: Nineteenth-Century Disability: Cultures & Contexts << NINES News
1 month 4 weeks ago
NINES is pleased to announce the latest addition to our collection of peer-reviewed resources - Nineteenth-Century Disability: Cultures & Contexts. Congratulations to Project Director Karen Bourrier and the entire team! The site is an interdisciplinary collection of primary texts and images about physical and cognitive disability in the long nineteenth century. The archive aims, in particular... << Read full post (external link)
Book Traces in Hyperallergic << NINES News
2 months 14 hours ago
Lovely article covering Book Traces for Hyperallergic by Allison C. Meier. Keep up the great work in the stacks, Book Traces team! http://hyperallergic.com/125215/the-call-to-action-to-save-digitized-books-from-oblivion/ << Read full post (external link)
Graphs in Romanticism Research << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
2 months 1 day ago
We are all aware of the hand-wringing that accompanies humanities scholarship in the early 21st century. Soon enough there will be another article announcing the death or worthlessness of the humanities degree. Subsequently there will be a rebuttal which points out how crucial the humanities are. And the cycle will continue. I am not trying to disparage that particular discussion, but I want to... Read full post (external link)

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