Romantic Education: Romantic Pedagogies and New Approaches to Teaching Romanticism
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award
What might romantic minimality and brevity suggest as alternative additions to our critical vocabulary in romantic studies? How do they allow us to think differently—and briefly—about a constellation of questions and perspectives that throw into relief the necessity to think through the small, negligent, obscure, too little or too much, the ephemeral, the mere ...
Romantic Education: Romantic Pedagogies and New Approaches to Teaching Romanticism
These essays offer diverse ways of thinking about the intersections of Romanticism and pedagogy: both what Romantic-era figures themselves thought about the processes of learning and teaching and also what we as modern educators might consider as we present these texts and figures to our students. It is our hope that they will contribute to ongoing conversations among scholars and teachers of...
The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it is to provide a single theoretical perspective with which to view those authors. Instead, the essays collectively convey a sense that Romantic writers...
NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Award

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional forum for conversations about Romantic pedagogy—both its boons and challenges.  Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials, and a panel of...

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on the other, to press the limits of the Gothic down to their most basic foundations, releasing new potentials. These essays all argue in different way...

Newest Resources

These essays offer diverse ways of thinking about the intersections of Romanticism and pedagogy: both what Romantic-era figures themselves thought about the processes of learning and teaching and also what we as modern educators might consider as we...
May 2016
What might romantic minimality and brevity suggest as alternative additions to our critical vocabulary in romantic studies? How do they allow us to think differently—and briefly—about a constellation of questions and perspectives that...
May 2016
The essays in this volume probe the way that Romantic writers explored the limits and possibilities of thinking in terms of systems. The purpose of the collection is not to provide a single perspective adopted by Romantic authors, any more than it...
March 2016

2015 Winners Announced

The contest was devised in the hopes of celebrating recent pedagogical innovation, inspiring creative new approaches and creating an additional...
December 2015

This volume of five essays focus on how the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley uses and modifies Gothic conventions across his whole writing career so as, on the one hand, to extend the limits of the Gothic, shading it into a wider Romanticism, and, on...

November 2015
This volume takes as its starting point a 2001 volume in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, Reading Shelley’s Interventionist Poetry, 1819-1820, in which volume-editor Michael Scrivener, employing Theodor Adorno's terminology, interrogates...
October 2015

News & Announcements from the RC Community

Gothic Poetry << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
1 month 3 weeks ago
We scholars of Romantic Gothic usually focus our attention on the Gothic novel, and indeed, the novel is what most people think of as Gothic literature. Gothic poetry has received surprisingly little critical attention. A search of the MLA International Bibliography for “gothic novel” yields 1052 results, for example; a search for “gothic poetry” yields 25. I wrote about a few of the poems I... See full post (external link)
“Swift winged words”: the vocabulary and word distribution of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly << The Cynic Sang
1 month 4 weeks ago
In the process of preparing the team to correct spelling errors in the digital archive of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly (errors in the transcription and in the original print version), I have made a few interesting observations about word distribution in the BIQ corpus (before the first online issues). On the principle that misspellings occur less frequently than correct spellings, I used a... See full post (external link)
Great Balls of Fire: Lightning Storms in Emma Courtney << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
2 months 3 days ago
This week, I was inspired by Arden’s posts of “brief cuts” from her dissertation to go back through ideas I’ve had in courses but have set aside for the time being. I stumbled onto one nugget of research that I found for a class on “Romanticism and Thing Theory,” taught by Prof. Jill Heydt-Stevenson in 2014, in which we were asked every week to identify a “thing” in the texts assigned and dig up... See full post (external link)
Poetry and Portraiture, or Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Obsession with Wordsworth’s Face << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
2 months 5 days ago
For the last few weeks, I’ve been reading through the letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and discovered something odd: Barrett Browning was seemingly obsessed with portraits of William Wordsworth. Writing to her friend Mrs. Martin in a letter dated December 7, 1836, Barrett Browning articulates the joy she felt upon first seeing an engraving of Wordsworth: “Papa has given me the first two... See full post (external link)
Virtual Blake << The Cynic Sang
2 months 1 week ago
As we continue work on the redesign of the Archive, our collaborative efforts with programmers and web designers who are unfamiliar with Blake’s work reveal aspects of the Archive’s structure and organization that we take for granted. Our bi-weekly meetings often involve volleys of patient explication: the Blake folks (Joe Viscomi, Ashley Reed, Mike Fox, and myself) offer mini lessons on Blake’s... See full post (external link)
The Inescapable Wordsworth << NASSR Graduate Student Caucus
2 months 1 week ago
My dissertation began as an attempt to distill a current of Romantic writing that has no use for the elegiac or the morbid—a Romanticism indifferent to death. I wanted to dilate moments that seemed to stray from the program of what Frances Ferguson called Wordsworth’s epitaphic mode—a mode of remembrance that Paul de Man recast as the figural anticipation of death. My suspicion was that... See full post (external link)

Calls for Papers

The following is a feed from the University of Pennsylvania English Department's Calls for Papers site. All items are from the "romantic" category.

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