About this Volume

About this Volume

Featuring essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism, this volume sheds new light on Romanticism's material and visual cultures. Romantic Antiquarianism reveals the important role that antiquarian discourses and practices played in shaping neoclassicism, the sublime, and other major concepts of the Romantic period. This volume of Romantic Circles Praxis Series includes an editor's introduction by Noah Heringman and Crystal B. Lake, with essays by Martin Myrone, Jonathan Sachs, Thora Brylowe, Rosemary Hill, Timothy Campbell, Ina Ferris, & Sam Smiles, and a response by Jonah Siegel.

This volume integrates literary scholarship on topics more familiar to Romanticists, such as the ballad revival and neoclassicism, with new research on visual and material culture. The volume includes essays by leading art historians, literary scholars, and historians of antiquarianism.

About the Design and Markup

This volume was designed at the University of Maryland by Michael Quilligan, Site Manager at Romantic Circles. The initial transformation from WORD Doc to TEI P5 was made using the OxGarage tool, with further TEI markup modifications according to RC house style applied by Michael Quilligan. TEI renders text in archival quality for better preservation and future access. Laura Mandell and Dave Rettenmaier developed the modified versions of the XSLT transforms provided by the TEI that were used to convert the TEI files into HTML. The image associated with this edition includes elements from an engraving by John Burnet (after William Allan), Sir Walter Scott in his Study (1831), which is used as an illustration in Rosemary Hill's essay in this volume. This image is from Dr. Hill's private collection and is used with permission.

About the Romantic Circles Praxis Series

The Romantic Circles Praxis Series is devoted to using computer technologies for the contemporary critical investigation of the languages, cultures, histories, and theories of Romanticism. Tracking the circulation of Romanticism within these interrelated domains of knowledge, RCPS recognizes as its conceptual terrain a world where Romanticism has, on the one hand, dissolved as a period and an idea into a plurality of discourses and, on the other, retained a vigorous, recognizable hold on the intellectual and theoretical discussions of today. RCPS is committed to mapping out this terrain with the best and most exciting critical writing of contemporary Romanticist scholarship.

About the Contributors

Noah Heringman is Professor of English at the University of Missouri. His scholarship is concerned with forging links between British and European Romanticism and the history of science. He has published two monographs, Romantic Rocks, Aesthetic Geology (2004), and Sciences of Antiquity: Romantic Antiquarianism, Natural History, and Knowledge Work (2013), as well as an edited volume, Romantic Science: The Commerce of Literature and Natural History (2003). Heringman has published articles on Romantic poetry, the history of geology, and the Anthropocene, among other topics. His current book project, Deep Time and the Prehistoric Turn, is supported by a National Humanities Center Fellowship (2014-2015).

Crystal B. Lake is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English Language and Literatures at Wright State University. Her work has appeared in ELH, RES, Modern Philology, and Eighteenth-Century Theory and Interpretation, and she has held visiting fellowships at the Lewis Walpole Library, the Yale Center for British Art, and Chawton House Library. She is currently completing a book project on artifacts in the long eighteenth century.

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Martin Myrone is Lead Curator, British Art to 1800, at Tate Britain, London. He specialises in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British art,. He is the author of Bodybuidling: Reforming Masculinities in British Art (Yale University Press 2005) and curator of many exhibitions at Tate Britain, including Gothic Nightmares (2005-6); John Martin: Apocalypse (2011-12); and British Folk Art (2014).

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Jonathan Sachs is Associate Professor of English at Concordia University and the Principal Investigator of the Montreal-based Interacting with Print Research Group. Sachs is the author of Romantic Antiquity: Rome in the British Imagination, 1789-1832 (Oxford UP, 2010) and is presently finishing a new book tentatively titled, Decline and the Depths of Time: Historicity and the Forms of Ruin in British Romanticism. In 2014-15 he will be a fellow at the National Humanities Center.

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Thora Brylowe is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests center on British eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century print culture and writing about the arts; she is especially interested in connections between editing, collecting, print technology, early copyright law, and the history of authorship.

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Rosemary Hill is an independent writer and historian. She is the author of God's Architect: Pugin and the Building of Romantic Britain (2007) which won the Wolfson History Prize and Stonehenge (2008) which won the Historians of British Art Prize. She is currently completing a book on antiquarianism in the Romantic period. She is a trustee of the Victorian Society, a contributing editor to the London Review of Books and a quondam fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. She lives in London.

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Timothy Campbell is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Chicago. His research focuses upon visual-cultural and consumer-material practices that reshaped historical representation in the literature of eighteenth-century and Romantic Britain. His wider interests extend to the history and theory of fashion, to problems of historical method in literary studies, and to forms of historiographical writing. He is completing a book manuscript entitled Historical Style: Fashion, Commerce, and History in Britain, 1740-1820 and has published essays in ELH and in a recent volume entitled Rethinking Historical Distance.

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Ina Ferris is Professor of English at the University of Ottawa. Her publications include Bookish Histories: Books, Literature, and Commercial Modernity, 1700-1900 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), co-edited with Paul Keen; The Romantic National Tale and the Question of Ireland (Cambridge UP, 2002); and The Achievement of Literary Authority: Gender, History and the Waverley Novels (Cornell UP, 1991).

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Sam Smiles is Associate Professor, Art History & Visual Culture, University of Exeter and Emeritus Professor of Art History, University of Plymouth. He has written extensively on British art, c. 1750-1950. His publications on image-making and antiquity include Envisioning the Past: Archaeology and the Image (Blackwell, 2005; co-editor); Eye Witness: Artists and Visual Documentation in Britain 1770-1830 (Ashgate, 2000); The Image of Antiquity: Ancient Britain and the Romantic Imagination (Yale, 1994) and the exhibition Landscapes of Retrospection: The Magoon Collection of British Prints and Drawings 1739-1860 (The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, 1999; co-curator). He is currently principal curator for Late Turner: Painting Set Free (Tate Britain, 2014) and is completing a book on Turner's and others so-called 'late styles.'

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Jonah Siegel is a professor of English at Rutgers University. He is the author of Desire and Excess: The Nineteenth-Century Culture of Art and Haunted Museum: Longing, Travel, and the Art-Romance Tradition. He is at work on a study of the place of the material in modern concepts of the aesthetic and another on the fate of art objects in the Napoleonic period.

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Published @ RC

June 2014