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Geoffrey Hartman and Harold Bloom:
Two Interviews

About This Volume

About This Volume

This volume of Romantic Circles Praxis Series includes an editor's introduction by Orrin N. C. Wang and interviews by co-editors Marc Redfield, and Laura Quinney of Geoffrey Hartman and Harold Bloom, respectively.

The text is encoded in HTML, but features no frames and a limited use of tables. It will work best with Netscape 4.0 or Internet Explorer 4.0 or higher or a comparable browser; earlier browsers may not display everything properly. Because you may enter and exit these files along multiple paths, you may need to use the back-arrow button on your browser to return to your starting point. The full text of the volume, like all hypertexts in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, is fully searchable.

The interview with Geoffrey Hartman was recorded by Kate Singer and transcribed by Lisa Marie Rhody. The interview with Harold Bloom was transcribed by William Flesch. The transcripts and other files were marked up in HTML by Lisa Marie Rhody at the University of Maryland. The volume cover and contents page were also designed and marked up by Lisa Marie Rhody. Photographs of Geoffrey Hartman and Harold Bloom were taken by T. Charles Erickson and used by permission of the Yale Office of Public Information.

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About the Romantic Circles Praxis Series

The Romantic Circles Praxis Series is devoted to using computer technologies for the contemporary critical investigation of the languages, cultures, histories, and theories of Romanticism. Tracking the circulation of Romanticism within these interrelated domains of knowledge, RCPS recognizes as its conceptual terrain a world where Romanticism has, on the one hand, dissolved as a period and an idea into a plurality of discourses and, on the other, retained a vigorous, recognizable hold on the intellectual and theoretical discussions of today. RCPS is committed to mapping out this terrain with the best and most exciting critical writing of contemporary Romanticist scholarship.

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About the Contributors

Orrin N. C. Wang teaches English and Comparative Literature at the University of Maryland. He is the author of Fantastic Modernity: Dialectical Readings in Romanticism and Theory (Johns Hopkins, 1996, 2001). He has published in such journals as Diacritics, Studies in Romanticism, MLQ, and ELH. He is the series editor of the Romantic Circles Praxis Series.

[go to introduction]

Harold Bloom is Sterling professor of Huminities at Yale University. He is currently writing a vast book called The Anatomy of Influence: A Labyrinth.

[go to interview]

Geoffrey Hartman is the author, most recently, of Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity (2002). Some of his previous books include: The Unmediated Vision (1954); Wordsworth's Poetry (1964); Beyond Formalism (1970); The Fate of Reading (1975); Criticism in the Wilderness (1980); The Unremarkable Wordsworth (1987); The Longest Shadow (1996); and The Fateful Question of Culture (1997).

[go to interview]

Laura Quinney teaches Romanticism at Brandeis University. She is the author of Literary Power and the Criteria of Truth (1995) and The Poetics of Disappointment: Wordsworth to Ashbery (1999).

[go to interview]

Marc Redfield is Professor of English and holds the John D. and Lillian Maguire Distinguished Chair in the Humanities at Claremont Graduate University. His publications include Phantom Formations: Aesthetic Ideology and the Bildungsroman (Ithaca, 1996, co-winner of the First Book Prize of the Modern Language Association) and The Politics of Aesthetics: Nationalism, Gender, Romanticism (Stanford, 2003). He has co-edited High Anxieties: Cultural Studies in Addiction (Berkeley, 2002); edited two special issues of the journal Diacritics: “Addictions” (1997) and “Theory, Globalization, Cultural Studies, and the Remains of the University” (2001); and has edited an issue of Romantic Praxis, Legacies of Paul de Man, that will be republished as a book by Fordham University Press. He is presently editing a special issue of the journal The Wordsworth Circle on the work of Geoffrey Hartman, and is writing a book on the romantic origins of the notion of a “war on terror.”

[go to interview]

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