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Romanticism and the New Deleuze

About This Volume

About This Volume

This volume of Romantic Circles Praxis Series includes an editor's introduction by Robert Mitchell and Ron Broglio, essays by Robert Mitchell, Ron Broglio, David Baulch, and David Collings.

This volume summarizes and utilizes the arc of Gilles Deleuze's work while turning it toward Blake, Kant, Shelley, and Wordsworth. It serves both as a primer for those not familiar with the idiosyncratic vocabulary and concepts of Deleuze as well as a thoughtful intervention in Romantic criticism in order to open up new terrain on travel, the sublime, and the revolutionary. Contributors include David Baulch on representation and revolution in Blake's America, Ron Broglio on Wordsworth and the picturesque narrative of encounter, and Robert Mitchell on P. B. Shelley's sublime, with a responding essay by David Collings. In an ongoing effort to make use of the multiple platforms of new media, Romantic Circles has provided audio of these essays. It is, we hope, one in a series of efforts at finding the proper utility of audiocasts.

The text is encoded in HTML, but features no frames and a limited use of tables. It will work best with Netscape 4.0 or Internet Explorer 4.0 or higher or a comparable browser; earlier browsers may not display everything properly. Because you may enter and exit these files along multiple paths, you may need to use the back-arrow button on your browser to return to your starting point. The full text of the volume, like all hypertexts in the Romantic Circles Praxis Series, is fully searchable.

The essays and other files were marked up in HTML by Joseph Byrne at the University of Maryland. The volume cover and contents page were also designed and marked up by Joseph Byrne.

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About the Romantic Circles Praxis Series

The Romantic Circles Praxis Series is devoted to using computer technologies for the contemporary critical investigation of the languages, cultures, histories, and theories of Romanticism. Tracking the circulation of Romanticism within these interrelated domains of knowledge, RCPS recognizes as its conceptual terrain a world where Romanticism has, on the one hand, dissolved as a period and an idea into a plurality of discourses and, on the other, retained a vigorous, recognizable hold on the intellectual and theoretical discussions of today. RCPS is committed to mapping out this terrain with the best and mo st exciting critical writing of contemporary Romanticist scholarship.

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About the Contributors

Robert Mitchell is Assistant Professor of English at Duke University. He is the author of Sympathy and the State in the Romantic Era: Systems, State Finance, and the Shadows of Futurity (Routledge, 2007), and articles on P. B. Shelley, S. T. Coleridge, and Adam Smith, among other subjects. He is also co-editor of the book series In Vivo (University of Washington Press) and co-author (with Catherine Waldby) of Tissue Economies: Blood, Organs and Cell Lines in Late Capitalism (Duke UP, 2006).

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Ron Broglio is an Assistant Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research focuses on how philosophy and aesthetics can help us rethink the relationship between humans and the environment. His book Technologies of the Picturesque: British Art, Poetry, and Instruments 1750-1830 (Bucknell 2008) addresses phenomenology and tool use in the British landscape aesthetic. He is beginning a second project on animals in contemporary art called On the Surface.

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David Baulch is Associate Professor of English at the University of West Florida. He has published articles on William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Thomas Lovell Beddoes. He also edited an edition of Beddoes's The Brides' Tragedy, published at Romantic Circles.

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David Collings is Professor of English at Bowdoin College. He is the author of Wordsworthian Errancies: The Poetics of Cultural Dismemberment (Johns Hopkins, 1994) and of Monstrous Society: Reciprocity, Discipline, and the Political Uncanny (forthcoming, Bucknell).  He is co-editor of Queer Romanticisms (Romanticism on the Net 36-37) and author of essays on Godwin, Malthus, Bentham, Thelwall, Coleridge, Mary Shelley, and contemporary Romantic criticism.

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