Praxis Series

Romantic Circles Praxis (ISSN: 1528-8129) is a series of peer-reviewed critical volumes devoted to the field of Romanticism and its theoretical underpinnings. Closer in form to a scholarly book of essays than a critical journal, each volume in Romantic Circles Praxis Series (RCPS) explores a particular subject, figure, or theoretical approach, such as the gothic, contemporary culture, discourses of empire, and many others.

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March 2001

An investigation into the scientific thought of Romantic writers, looking at the Romantics' conflicted attitudes toward Enlightenment-based science, and offering speculative explorations of their work in the framework of more recent scientific developments. Edited by Hugh Roberts, essays by Arkady Plotnitsky and R. Paul Yoder.
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November 2000

Essays devoted to English India as it appears in Romantic studies, and the institutional effects of colonial discourse. Edited by Daniel J. O'Quinn, essays by Siraj Ahmed, L. M. Findlay, Daniel J. O'Quinn, Rita Raley, Susan B. Taylor, and Kate Teltscher.
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April 2000

Readings of Jane Austen and Romanticism, and their influence on each other. Edited by William Galperin, essays by George Levine, Michael Gamer, Deidre Lynch, Susan J. Wolfson, Adam Potkay, and William Walling.
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January 2000

An examination of the works of Friedrich Schelling, one of the three major figures in the philosophical and aesthetic history of the Romantic period, and important influence on Coleridge. This volume looks particularly at Schelling's writings on freedom. Edited by David S. Ferris, essays by Jan Mieszkowski, David S. Ferris, and David L. Clark.
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November 1999

A retrospective volume looking at how the poems of the Lyrical Ballads continue to be important and relevant, especially with respect to American writers and readers. Edited by Marcy L. Tanter, essays by Joel Pace, Charles Rzepka, and Elizabeth Fay.
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August 1999

A debate on the question of aesthetics and the uses of pleasure in Romanticism, looking at the role of affective experience in aesthetic judgment and the production of meaning, as played out in the interior and social worlds. Edited by Karen Weisman, with essays and responses by Theresa Kelley and Thomas Pfau.
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Both "irony" and "clerisy" emerge into peculiar discursive prominence during the Romantic era. This volume shows how these two seemingly heterogeneous strands of Romantic discourse come to be linked, and play upon each other. Edited by Deborah Elise White, with essays by Adam Carter, Charles Mahoney, Linda Brigham, and Forest Pyle.
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February 1999

A study of Romantic legal discourse-especially the evolving concepts of intellectual property, blasphemy, sedition, and treason-as a history of textual hermeneutics, a trajectory of misinterpretation and reinterpretation. Edited by Michael Macovski, with essays by Margaret Russett, Susan Eilenberg, Michael Scrivener, and Kathryn Temple.
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April 1998

Looks at Romantic women writers' attitudes towards love, particularly as impacted by gender and tradition-inscribed relations, countering the transcendence of love implicit in theories of the sublime. Edited by Elizabeth Fay, essays by Adela Pinch, Jeffrey Robinson, Charles Rzepka, Andrew M. Stauffer, & Nanora Sweet.
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August 1997

Re-assesses Shelley's early verse, showing that, far from being mere juvenilia, it offers an aesthetics of excess and a politics of resistance that provides access to the early Regency culture, as well as to Shelley's art and thought in general. Edited by Neil Fraistat, with essays by Linda Brigham, William Keach, Timothy Morton, and Donald H. Reiman.
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An interview of W. J. T. Mitchell with Orrin N. C. Wang. Includes Mitchell's unconventional answers/narrative—his "Romantic Education"—as well as an equally unconventional gloss by Wang, entitled "The Sorrows of Young Wieboldt."
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July 1997

Focuses on the conspiracy narratives prevalent in England in the 1790s, centered on the English Jacobins and their opponents, and carried forth into the discourse of the second generation of Romanticism. Edited by Orrin N. C. Wang, with essays by Kevin Gilmartin, Charles Mahoney, Thomas Pfau, and Kim Wheatley.
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