Praxis Series

Readings of Jane Austen and Romanticism, and their influence on each other. Edited by William Galperin, essays by George Levine, Michael Gamer, Deidre Lynch, Susan J. Wolfson, Adam Potkay, and William Walling.
This volume addresses a perceived opposition between philosophy and critical theory on the one hand, and culture or cultural studies on the other. It seeks to revalidate critical work that develops a philosophy of culture and a culturally historical philosophy. This volume is edited and introduced by Rei Terada, with essays by Manu Chander, Ted Underwood, Thomas Pfau, J. Hillis Miller, and Daniel Tiffany.
Focuses on the conspiracy narratives prevalent in England in the 1790s, centered on the English Jacobins and their opponents, and carried forth into the discourse of the second generation of Romanticism. Edited by Orrin N. C. Wang, with essays by Kevin Gilmartin, Charles Mahoney, Thomas Pfau, and Kim Wheatley.
This volume contextualizes work by and work about Joanna Baillie with respect to revisionist thinking about utopianism. Since utopianism has become a positively valued concept within sociological, legal, and other fields, its implications for an understanding of Baillie's approach to social change/social problems, as well as for an understanding of scholarship recovering Baillie for contemporary purposes, deserve to be explored. This volume is edited and introduced by Regina Hewitt, with essays by Thomas McLean, Robert C. Hale, William D. Brewer, Marjean D. Purinton, and Regina Hewitt.
The essays in this volume move beyond the notation of literary influence or ideological parallelism to perform a functional taxonomy of transatlantic Romanticism, helping to explain why the movement developed at different times and rates in different places around the Atlantic. Edited by Lance Newman, Joel Pace and Chris Koenig-Woodyard, this volume includes essays by Joselyn Almeida, Jen Camden, Andre Cardoso, James Crane, Sarah Ferguson-Wagstaffe, Scott Harshbarger, Rebecca Cole Heinowitz, Sohui Lee, and Cree LeFavour.
This volume offers a series of essays in which contributors meditate on how the concept of education intersects with sublime theory and Romantic aesthetics more generally. Broadly speaking, this volume produces a set of revisionary readings rooted in the critical philosophy of Immanuel Kant and its place in our ongoing understanding of Romantic aesthetics and sublime theory. An underlying inspiration of this volume is the pedagogical theory of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, who has thought widely about humanities-based training using Romantic-era texts as principal theoretical and literary tools, formative among them the aesthetic philosophy of Kant. This volume is edited and introduced by J. Jennifer Jones, with essays by Christopher Braider, Frances Ferguson, Paul Hamilton, Anne C. McCarthy, Forest Pyle, Deborah Elise White, and an afterword by Ian Balfour.
This forum attends to the sounding sense of Romantic poetry, both thematically (a poetics of sound) and sensually/phonically (the poetry of sound and the sound of poetry). This volume is edited and introduced by Susan J. Wolfson, with essays by Susan J. Wolfson, James Chandler, Garrett Stewart, and Adam Potkay.
This volume looks at the protean constructions of sexuality in the Romantic period and in current Romanticist scholarship. Edited, introduced by Richard C. Sha, essays by Richard C. Sha, David M. Halperin, Jonathan Loesberg, Elizabeth Fay, Jillian Heydt-Stevenson, Susan S. Lanser, Bradford K. Mudge, Daniel O'Quinn and Andrew Elfenbein.
This volume begins to unpack the relationships among the three terms of its title. Despite its air of neutrality, "secularism" is increasingly understood to have its own interests, particularly when it comes to defining and managing the "religious." And, thanks to its constitutive relationship to modernity, romanticism is invested in secularism, not least in those moments typically coded as "spiritual" or "religious." Cosmopolitanism, too, bears a vexed relationship to a period typically associated with nationalism. Finally, secularism and cosmopolitanism are themselves related in surprising ways, both historically and conceptually. Do they pursue the same project? Do they diverge? How and when? And how does romantic writing figure such alignments? These are the questions motivating the three essays in this volume. This volume is edited and introduced by Colin Jager, with essays by Mark Canuel, Colin Jager, Paul Hamilton, and an afterword by Bruce Robbins.
An examination of the works of Friedrich Schelling, one of the three major figures in the philosophical and aesthetic history of the Romantic period, and important influence on Coleridge. This volume looks particularly at Schelling's writings on freedom. Edited by David S. Ferris, essays by Jan Mieszkowski, David S. Ferris, and David L. Clark.
Essays devoted to English India as it appears in Romantic studies, and the institutional effects of colonial discourse. Edited by Daniel J. O'Quinn, essays by Siraj Ahmed, L. M. Findlay, Daniel J. O'Quinn, Rita Raley, Susan B. Taylor, and Kate Teltscher.
This volume addresses the question of "Romanticism and the Insistence of the Aesthetic" by considering Romantic versions of the relationship between the aesthetic and power, whether as a form of violence or a force of possibility. Edited by Forest Pyle, with essays by Ian Balfour, David Ferris, Karen Swann and a response by Marc Redfield.
An electronic version of an interview with Morris Eaves, Robert Essick, and Joseph Viscomi, editors of The Blake Archive, on the 10th anniversary of its founding. With topics of conversation running the gamut from the winsome (Blake kitsch) to the peculiar (hypothetical extensions of Blake's canon). Edited by Kari Kraus.
This volume includes a pair of wide-ranging conversations, one between Geoffrey Hartman and Marc Redfield and the other between Harold Bloom and Laura Quinney. While differing in tone, setting, and topics, both conversations reaffirm the centrality of Hartman and Bloom in any history of the study of Romanticism for the last half century. Edited by Orrin Wang.
This volume explores intersections between Western thinking and Eastern religion. Each essay re-examines Romantic-era work in light of the "guides and basic principles" of Buddhist thought. Edited and introduction by Mark Lussier, essays by Louise Economides, Timothy Morton, John Rudy, Dennis McCort, and a poem by Norman Dubie.
An interview with noted Romanticist Jerome Christensen, presented in the form of a multi-linked site organized around a constellation of "common topics" found in Christensen's work. Offers a revised transcript, and audio files. Edited by Steven Newman.
An investigation into the scientific thought of Romantic writers, looking at the Romantics' conflicted attitudes toward Enlightenment-based science, and offering speculative explorations of their work in the framework of more recent scientific developments. Edited by Hugh Roberts, essays by Arkady Plotnitsky and R. Paul Yoder.
This collection of essays considers the importance of opera as both an essential ritual of court culture and an innovative art form with a considerable impact on period literature. Edited by Gillen D'Arcy Wood, with essays by Christina Fuhrmann, Diane Long Hoeveler, J. Jennifer Jones , Jessica K. Quillin, and Anne Williams.
This volume summarizes and utilizes the arc of Gilles Deleuze's work while turning it towards Romantic writers, providing a thoughtful intervention in Romantic criticism, opening up new terrain on travel, the sublime, and the revolutionary. This volume is edited by Ron Broglio, with an introduction by Robert Mitchell and Ron Broglio, and essays by Robert Mitchell, Ron Broglio, David Baulch, and David Collings.
The essays in this volume evaluate the legacies of Paul de Man, who continues symbolically to embody an aspect of "theory" that resists easy routinization. Edited by Marc Redfield, with essays by Ian Balfour, Cynthia Chase, Sara Guyer, Jan Mieszkowski, Arkady Plotnitsky, Marc Redfield, Rei Terada, and Andrzej Warminski.
This volume brings together recent and more seasoned Blake scholars to explore how new media provides another mode of inquiry into Blake's complex verbal and visual texts. Edited by Ron Broglio, with essays by David M. Baulch, Marcel O'Gorman, Nelson Hilton, Joseph Byrne, Adam Komisaruk, Steven Guynup, and Fred Yee.
Re-assesses Shelley's early verse, showing that, far from being mere juvenilia, it offers an aesthetics of excess and a politics of resistance that provides access to the early Regency culture, as well as to Shelley's art and thought in general. Edited by Neil Fraistat, with essays by Linda Brigham, William Keach, Timothy Morton, and Donald H. Reiman.
A look at the role of the natural world in the works of Romantic writers in the wake of the French Revolution, positing the proto-ecological argument that all living beings are full participants in the progress of liberty. Edited by James McKusick, essays by Kurt Fosso, Timothy Fulford, Kevin Hutchings, Timothy Morton, Ashton Nichols, and William Stroup.
Essays focusing in on two pivotal dreams of Mary Shelley's protagonist, Victor Frankenstein, in her novel Frankenstein, offering various interpretations, found in the book and its many adaptations, including film. Edited by Jerrold E. Hogle, with essays by Anne Williams, Matthew VanWinkle, John Rieder and Marc Redfield.
This volume suggests the myriad ways in which the surprisingly neglected (and critically undigested) Romantic culture of gastronomy influenced artistic production of nineteenth-century Britain and France-at the same time as it raised new philosophical challenges. Edited and introduction by Denise Gigante, this volume includes essays by Carolyn Korsmeyer, Joshua Wilner, and Michael Garval.

Pages

Subscribe to Praxis Series