Praxis Series

A reading of Shelley's interventionist poetry of 1819-20-including his satires The Mask of Anarchy and Swellfoot the Tyrant-as provocations, dialectical interventions, and pretexts for speculation. Edited by Michael Scrivener, with essays by Samuel Gladden, Robert Kaufman, and Mark Kipperman, with responses by Steven E. Jones.
Both "irony" and "clerisy" emerge into peculiar discursive prominence during the Romantic era. This volume shows how these two seemingly heterogeneous strands of Romantic discourse come to be linked, and play upon each other. Edited by Deborah Elise White, with essays by Adam Carter, Charles Mahoney, Linda Brigham, and Forest Pyle.
A study of Romantic legal discourse-especially the evolving concepts of intellectual property, blasphemy, sedition, and treason-as a history of textual hermeneutics, a trajectory of misinterpretation and reinterpretation. Edited by Michael Macovski, with essays by Margaret Russett, Susan Eilenberg, Michael Scrivener, and Kathryn Temple.
A look at book-culture and bibliomania in early 19th-century England, as seen through emerging genres such as the familiar essay, and the formation of private libraries as personal sites of collection and memory. Edited by Ina Ferris, with essays by H. J. Jackson, Ina Ferris and Deidre Lynch.
A retrospective volume looking at how the poems of the Lyrical Ballads continue to be important and relevant, especially with respect to American writers and readers. Edited by Marcy L. Tanter, essays by Joel Pace, Charles Rzepka, and Elizabeth Fay.
An interview of W. J. T. Mitchell with Orrin N. C. Wang. Includes Mitchell's unconventional answers/narrative—his "Romantic Education"—as well as an equally unconventional gloss by Wang, entitled "The Sorrows of Young Wieboldt."
Obi
A volume devoted to the Romantic-era play Obi; or, Three-Finger'd Jack, about escaped slave/rebel Jack Mansong. Includes text of both pantomime and melodrama, and video from a modern production. Edited by Charles Rzepka, with essays by Peter Buckley, Jeffrey N. Cox, Jerrold E. Hogle, Robert Hoskins, Debbie Lee, and Charles Rzepka.
Looks at Romantic women writers' attitudes towards love, particularly as impacted by gender and tradition-inscribed relations, countering the transcendence of love implicit in theories of the sublime. Edited by Elizabeth Fay, essays by Adela Pinch, Jeffrey Robinson, Charles Rzepka, Andrew M. Stauffer, & Nanora Sweet.
The current cretinization of public, political language is often viewed as synonomous with the discourse of patriotism. This volume begins to demonstrate how complex the vocabulary of patriotism actually is, by investigating its diverse use during the Romantic period. Edited by Orrin Wang, essays by Francesco Crocco, Matthew Borushko, Daniel O'Quinn, Andrew Lincoln, Noah Heringman, and Jan Mieszkowski.
A debate on the question of aesthetics and the uses of pleasure in Romanticism, looking at the role of affective experience in aesthetic judgment and the production of meaning, as played out in the interior and social worlds. Edited by Karen Weisman, with essays and responses by Theresa Kelley and Thomas Pfau.
Looks at the influence of Romanticism on poets writing today, presenting three divergent analyses of five contemporary poets. Includes contributions from both Romanticists and critics of modern (and postmodern) poetry. Edited by Lisa M. Steinman, with essays by Charles Altieri, Robert Kaufman, and Ellen Keck Stauder.
This volume offers a series of shifting perspectives on the emergence of psychoanalysis and a psychoanalytical consciousness in early and later British and German Romantic poetry, fiction, philosophy, and science. Rather than read psychoanalysis as one of Romanticism's inevitable outcomes, this volume reads for what remains unthought between Romantic thought and contemporary theory and criticism about Romanticism and psychoanalysis. The papers herein map versions of a psychoanalysis avant la lettre, but more crucially these essays imagine how psychoanalysis before Freud thinks itself differently, as well as anticipating and staging its later concerns, theorizations, and institutionalizations. Together they offer what might be called the profoundly psychosomatic matrix within which the specters of modern subjectivity materialize themselves. This volume is edited and introduced by Joel Faflak, with essays by Matt ffytche, Ildiko Csengei, Julie Carlson, Mary Jacobus, Ross Woodman, and Tilottama Rajan.
The essays in Romantic Frictions find in Romanticism what philosophical modernity has often found there: a disposition to recognize oppositions that cannot be squared or resolved precisely because they constitute the ongoing work of culture and writing. Such frictions are embedded in a shifting temporal moment whose inner complexity is similarly textured such that neither history nor philosophy assumes a master (and fictional) disguise. Both are instead crosscut and assembled in ways that sustain an inner friction that invites being read. Rather than reify the critical tendency, stubbornly at issue since the 1980s, to suppose that Romanticism belongs either to deconstructive philosophy or to new historicism, the essays in this volume understand romanticism as a cultural and literary terrain where these and other disciplinary affiliations exist together, not as easy companions but as productive antagonists. This volume is edited and introduced by Theresa M. Kelley, with essays by Ian Duncan, Mary A. Favret, Daniel O'Quinn, Matthew Rowlinson, Colin Jager, and Jacques Khalip.
This Romantic Circles Praxis Volume moves the perspective of critical inquiry into British Romanticism from the Island (England) to the Islands (West Indies), considering the particular significance of the Atlantic—watery vortex of myriad economic and cultural exchanges, roaring multiplicity of agencies, and vast whirlpool of creative powers. Black Romanticism remembers a forgotten ancestry of British culture, recovering the vital agencies of diasporic Africans and creole cultures of the West Indies. It does so by practicing counter-literacy, reading the works of nation, empire, and colony against themselves to liberate the common cultures they occlude. The five essays presented here examine texts by or about Jean Jacque Dessalines, Juan Manzano, Jack Mansong, Mary Prince, and John Gabriel Stedman, following a circuitous route that begins in Africa and travels from Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, Suriname, Bermuda, and Antigua to corresponding points in England, America, and the continent. The circulation of radically different adaptations of the “same” material provides new ways to understand the colonial Caribbean. This volume is edited and introduced by Paul Youngquist and Frances Botkin, with essays by Lindsay J. Twa, Lissette Lopez Szwydky, Joselyn Almeida, Dustin Kennedy, and Michele Speitz.
This volume looks at the profound challenges William Blake poses to both editors and readers. Despite the promises of the current multi-modal environment, the effort to represent Blake's works as he intended them to be read is increasingly being recognized as an editorial fantasy. All editorial work necessitates mediation and misrepresentation. Yet editorial work also illuminates much in Blake's corpus, and more remains to be done. The essays in this volume grapple with past, present, and future attempts at editing Blake's idiosyncratic verbal and visual work for a wide variety of audiences who will read Blake using numerous forms of media. This volume is edited by Wayne C. Ripley and Justin Van Kleeck. It includes an editor's introduction by Wayne C. Ripley, with essays by David Fuller, W. H. Stevenson, Mary Lynn Johnson, Rachel Lee and J. Alexandra McGhee, Justin Van Kleeck, and Wayne C. Ripley.
Capitalizing on the conjunction of renewed scholarly interest in Thelwall and new archival finds, this collection of essays addresses the central question of the coherence and continuity of Thelwall's diverse pursuits—literary, political, scientific, therapeutic, elocutionary, and journalistic—across the four decades of his career (c. 1790-1830), and provides new insight into Thelwall's eclipse and persistence in the nineteenth century. The volume includes an introduction by Yasmin Solomonescu and essays by Nicholas Roe, Mary Fairclough, Molly Desjardins, Emily Stanback, Steve Poole, Angela Esterhammer, and Patty O'Boyle.
The essays in this volume explore the relationship between Romantic Gothicism and the rise of the visual technologies centred on commercial exploitation of the magic lantern. Edited and introduced by Robert Miles , with essays by Fred Botting, Diane Long Hoeveler, Sophie Thomas, Dale Townshend, and Angela Wright.
Essays that examine teaching Romanticism in the context of popular culture, and a debate entitled "Presentism versus Archivalism." Edited by Laura Mandell and Michael Eberle-Sinatra, essays by Phillip Barrish, Ron Broglio, Jay Clayton, Jon Klancher, Jerome McGann, David Simpson, Atara Stein, Gregory Tomso, Ted Underwood.
Romantic-era fans collected autographs, souvenirs, portraits and relics of celebrity writers, artists, performers and athletes; pored over gossip-filled periodicals and newspaper notices; imitated celebrities' fashion statements; fantasized about becoming friends or lovers with celebrities; got caught up in "crazes" for persons and texts; created fan fiction, wrote fan mail and formed communities of like-minded devotees. Analyzing fan practices across a range of cultural contexts, the essays in this volume will explore how the concept of "fandom" can help us make sense of the role of various audiences in the cultural activity and cultural productions of the Romantic period. The volume includes an introduction by Eric Eisner and essays by Nicola J. Watson, Clara Tuite, Mark Schoenfield, and David A. Brewer.
Romanticism and Disaster considers and responds to the timely concept of devastated life by thinking about how the capacity to read, interpret, and absorb disaster necessitates significant changes in theory, ethics, and common life. What if the consequences or "experience" of a disaster were less about psychic survival than an unblinking desire to face down the disaster as a challenge to normative structures? The essays in this volume attend to the rhetorical, epistemological, political, and social effects of romantic critique, and reflect on how processes of destruction and reconstitution, ruination and survival, are part and parcel of romanticism's grappling with a negativity that haunts its corners. Put in this way, "disaster" does not signal a referential event, but rather an undoing of certain apparently prior categories of dwelling, and forces us to contemplate living otherwise. In confronting the end of things, what are the conditions or possibilities of existence amidst catastrophe? What is a crisis, and what kinds of challenges does it occasion? What can be philosophically gained or lost by analyzing disaster in its multiple sites, contexts, and instances? This volume is edited and introduced by Jacques Khalip and David Collings, with essays by Scott J. Juengel, William Keach, Timothy Morton, and Rei Terada.
Robert Bloomfield's letters document one artist’s struggles (and sometimes his victories) to share his unique voice and vision; the online publication of his extant letters (a companion to this collection of essays) reveals new and exciting insights into Bloomfield the artist and the man. The essays included in this collection highlight and draw attention to aspects of Bloomfield's literary production that would likely not be possible without the full access to his letters that the edition provides, and make a strong case for why Bloomfield continues to be worthy of study. They suggest how much more remains to be said about this prolific poet. This volume is edited and introduced by John Goodridge and Bridget Keegan, with essays by Tim Fulford, Peter Denney, Ian Haywood, and Bridget Keegan.
The aim of this volume is to explore the Romantic credit crisis of 1797-1821. The decision to end cash payments and flood the economy with low denominational banknotes led to a spectacular increase in executions for banknote forgery. Many Romantic writers saw this bloody debacle as a sensational illustration of the dangers of an economic system based on mere "paper" value. While some critical attention has been given to the cultural history of credit (Brantlinger, Poovey), the issue of forgery has been overlooked. Yet, as the essays in this volume show, the impact of the credit crisis and its thousands of victims affected literature, journalism and art in often profound ways. Ian Haywood edits and contributes to the volume, along with Robert Miles, Alex Benchimol, Alex J. Dick, and Nick Groom.
The six essays in this volume offer a range of mediations prompted by the volume’s title. This volume explores older and newer logics of “matching” and “counting” and “measuring” (whether statistical, geometric, or otherwise un/calculable); they register as well an upsurge in interest in formal-language, neurocognitive and medial-historical approaches. These essays invite us to think “bodies,” “multitudes,” and “subjectivity” along different axes. They ask us to think about the (romantic) one, the (romantic) proper name, quantity, and quality; they invite us to reflect on the status of poetry and measure, about the work of the novel as totalization, about models of mind, about calculuses of populations and food. Ranging through Wordsworth, Scott, Malthus, Babbage, and Galt (among others), this volume points to new directions in romanticist thinking while reconstructing the complexity of romantic-period thought. Edited and introduced by Maureen N. McLane, with essays by Matthew F. Wickman, Marjorie Levinson, James Brooke-Smith, John Savarese, Bo Earle, and Ron Broglio, along with two responses by Maureen N. McLane: Response #1, Response #2.
This collection of articles is intended to initiate a conversation about and between biopolitics and romanticism. Its broad contention is that the study of biopolitics reanimates the question of romanticism in two senses. First, the set of conceptual resources provided in recent work on biopolitics opens up inventive lines of inquiry that enable scholars to re-think the already established awareness that the literature, philosophy, and culture of romanticism displays an obsession with life. In another sense biopolitics reanimates romanticism insofar as the current scholarly concern with life as an object of power marks the radical survival of romanticism. If romanticism responds well when examined in the light of contemporary biopolitical theory, then a constitutive part of this response is a certain resistance to biopolitical theory. The contributors to this volume demonstrate that the biopolitical intervention on life engages paradoxes, predicaments, and aporias that have been widely or fully appreciated neither by theorists of biopolitics nor by critics who take up their work. Romanticism, we suggest, is a privileged locus for the awareness that even the most assured representation of life turns upon an irreducible “literariness.” Edited and introduced by Alastair Hunt and Matthias Rudolf, with essays by Marc Redfield, Emily Sun, and Sara Guyer, along with a response by Eva Geulen.

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