Romantic Circles Publications

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October 2010

Romantic Circles is pleased to announce the publication of William Dodd's long poem Thoughts in Prison (1777). Written while he was awaiting execution for forgery in his Newgate prison cell, the poem is unique among prison writings and in the history of English literature: none of the many reflections, stories, essays, ballads, and broadside "Confessions" originating—or purporting to have originated—in a jail cell over the last few hundred years can begin to match it in length, in the irony of its author's notoriety, or in the completeness of its erasure from history after a meteoric career in print that began to wane only at the turn of the nineteenth century.

An appendix presents manuscript versions of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "This Lime-Tree Bower, my Prison," by way of suggesting a reliance, at least metaphorically, on this major work of prison literature by Romantic writers.

September 2010

This volume looks at the profound challenges William Blake poses to both editors and readers. Despite the promises of the current multi-modal environment, the effort to represent Blake's works as he intended them to be read is increasingly being recognized as an editorial fantasy. All editorial work necessitates mediation and misrepresentation. Yet editorial work also illuminates much in Blake's corpus, and more remains to be done. The essays in this volume grapple with past, present, and future attempts at editing Blake's idiosyncratic verbal and visual work for a wide variety of audiences who will read Blake using numerous forms of media. This volume is edited by Wayne C. Ripley and Justin Van Kleeck. It includes an editor's introduction by Wayne C. Ripley, with essays by David Fuller, W. H. Stevenson, Mary Lynn Johnson, Rachel Lee and J. Alexandra McGhee, Justin Van Kleeck, and Wayne C. Ripley.

August 2010

This volume offers a series of essays in which contributors meditate on how the concept of education intersects with sublime theory and Romantic aesthetics more generally. Broadly speaking, this volume produces a set of revisionary readings rooted in the critical philosophy of Immanuel Kant and its place in our ongoing understanding of Romantic aesthetics and sublime theory. An underlying inspiration of this volume is the pedagogical theory of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, who has thought widely about humanities-based training using Romantic-era texts as principal theoretical and literary tools, formative among them the aesthetic philosophy of Kant. This volume is edited and introduced by J. Jennifer Jones, with essays by Christopher Braider, Frances Ferguson, Paul Hamilton, Anne C. McCarthy, Forest Pyle, Deborah Elise White, and an afterword by Ian Balfour.

September 2009

This edition builds upon new scholarship on Romantic rural poet Robert Bloomfield, collecting all his extant letters plus a selection of those written to him by literary correspondents, with the hope that by presenting a properly edited and annotated collected letters we might enable the poet to be a significant figure for all those studying early nineteenth-century literature and culture.

May 2009

This edition of Frankenstein, in gestation for over fifteen years, provides the texts of both the 1818 and 1831 editions, as well as copious annotations that emphasize the novel's strong inter- and intra-textual connections.

March 2009

Robert Southey was one of the best-known, controversial and innovative writers in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. Based upon extensive new archival research, this Collected edition makes available for the first time all his surviving letters, freshly edited, annotated and introduced. Part One covers 1791-1797, turbulent years which saw the forging of Southey's career and reputation, his involvement in radical politics, and the beginning of his friendships with Wordsworth and Coleridge.
Robert Southey was one of the best-known, controversial and innovative writers in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain. Based upon extensive new archival research, this Collected edition makes available for the first time all his surviving letters, freshly edited, annotated and introduced.

December 2008

This volume offers a series of shifting perspectives on the emergence of psychoanalysis and a psychoanalytical consciousness in early and later British and German Romantic poetry, fiction, philosophy, and science. Rather than read psychoanalysis as one of Romanticism's inevitable outcomes, this volume reads for what remains unthought between Romantic thought and contemporary theory and criticism about Romanticism and psychoanalysis. The papers herein map versions of a psychoanalysis avant la lettre, but more crucially these essays imagine how psychoanalysis before Freud thinks itself differently, as well as anticipating and staging its later concerns, theorizations, and institutionalizations. Together they offer what might be called the profoundly psychosomatic matrix within which the specters of modern subjectivity materialize themselves. This volume is edited and introduced by Joel Faflak, with essays by Matt ffytche, Ildiko Csengei, Julie Carlson, Mary Jacobus, Ross Woodman, and Tilottama Rajan.

August 2008

This volume begins to unpack the relationships among the three terms of its title. Despite its air of neutrality, "secularism" is increasingly understood to have its own interests, particularly when it comes to defining and managing the "religious." And, thanks to its constitutive relationship to modernity, romanticism is invested in secularism, not least in those moments typically coded as "spiritual" or "religious." Cosmopolitanism, too, bears a vexed relationship to a period typically associated with nationalism. Finally, secularism and cosmopolitanism are themselves related in surprising ways, both historically and conceptually. Do they pursue the same project? Do they diverge? How and when? And how does romantic writing figure such alignments? These are the questions motivating the three essays in this volume. This volume is edited and introduced by Colin Jager, with essays by Mark Canuel, Colin Jager, Paul Hamilton, and an afterword by Bruce Robbins.

August 2008

This collection explores the challenges of teaching narrative fiction published between 1789 and 1830. These essays engage with the ways in which Romantic-era fiction challenges not just period conventions, but pedagogical practices and undergraduate scholarship. Topics examined include issues raised by teaching "historical" novels to modern students, reading Jane Austen in a time of war, depictions of racialized bodies in reformist fictions, and situating Romantic fictions in place and social contexts. Emphasizing new possibilities for classroom teaching and demonstrating that scholarly pursuits and teaching need not exist in separate spheres, the essays also offer practical approaches to "folding" Romantic-era fiction into existing course projects at the same time that they examine the questions raised by including texts and writers that, until recently, have been largely ignored.

July 2008

This volume contextualizes work by and work about Joanna Baillie with respect to revisionist thinking about utopianism. Since utopianism has become a positively valued concept within sociological, legal, and other fields, its implications for an understanding of Baillie's approach to social change/social problems, as well as for an understanding of scholarship recovering Baillie for contemporary purposes, deserve to be explored. This volume is edited and introduced by Regina Hewitt, with essays by Thomas McLean, Robert C. Hale, William D. Brewer, Marjean D. Purinton, and Regina Hewitt.

July 2008

This chronology orders all known Baillie letters and provides more accurate dates and identifications for many of the previously published letters. By providing watermarks, the place of writing, and the correspondents' names, the chronology also gives a new vantage point from which to view Baillie's life and times. It is published in conjunction with the Romantic Circles Praxis volume Utopianism and Joanna Baillie, edited by Regina Hewitt, to which Thomas McLean contributed an essay explaining this chronological listing.

June 2008

This volume addresses a perceived opposition between philosophy and critical theory on the one hand, and culture or cultural studies on the other. It seeks to revalidate critical work that develops a philosophy of culture and a culturally historical philosophy. This volume is edited and introduced by Rei Terada, with essays by Manu Chander, Ted Underwood, Thomas Pfau, J. Hillis Miller, and Daniel Tiffany.

April 2008

Intended to help Romanticists keep informed about recent publications in the field, this resource offers the Tables of Contents to recent editions of selected Romantics journals, and offers an annual listing of books that are likely to be of interest to students of Romanticism.

April 2008

This forum attends to the sounding sense of Romantic poetry, both thematically (a poetics of sound) and sensually/phonically (the poetry of sound and the sound of poetry). This volume is edited and introduced by Susan J. Wolfson, with essays by Susan J. Wolfson, James Chandler, Garrett Stewart, and Adam Potkay.

March 2008

This edition provides an annotated text of the play, supplemented by a wide range of literary and journalistic materials that offer contexts in which to understand the work's place in relation to the authors' politics, the transmission and reception of news, and the role of Robespierre within English political culture.

January 2008

This volume summarizes and utilizes the arc of Gilles Deleuze's work while turning it towards Romantic writers, providing a thoughtful intervention in Romantic criticism, opening up new terrain on travel, the sublime, and the revolutionary. This volume is edited by Ron Broglio, with an introduction by Robert Mitchell and Ron Broglio, and essays by Robert Mitchell, Ron Broglio, David Baulch, and David Collings.

December 2007

A collection of 46 letters published in full for the first time, shedding new light on the life and character of Charles Brown and the most important friendship in the Keats Circle, as well as Keats’s complex legacy to his friends.

August 2007

This edition presents both the full text and relevant contexts of the play, including a comprehensive introduction and extensive notes by the editor, two of the sources of the play, and four contemporary reviews.
This is a critical biography of William Taylor of Norwich (1765-1836), translated from the German of Georg Herzfeld (1897), with additional introduction and notes. Translated by Astrid Wind, edited with an introduction by David Chandler.

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