A-Af - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
AARON'S...........1
Aaron's breastplate, and the seven The Eve of St. Mark, Line 33
 
ABASH'D...........1
May be confounded and abash'd withal, Lamia, Part II, Line 58
 
ABATE.............1
O'erpowered me - it sank. Then 'gan abate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 674
 
ABBOT.............11
ETHELBERT, an Abbot Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 8
Let not the abbot pass. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Voice, Line 54b
Thou cursed abbot , why Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 57b
Old abbot , stand here forth. Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 111
Sit. And now, abbot , what have you to say? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 112
What more to the purpose, abbot ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 127b
Abbot , speak their names. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 155b
I will confess, O holy abbot !- How! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 99
Prince Gersa's freeing Abbot Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 7
The lady weeping, the old abbot cowl'd. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 12
A kind forbearance, holy abbot . Come, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 6
 
ABBOT'S...........1
Let us be calm, and hear the abbot's plea Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 100
 
ABIDE.............1
And, for my sake, let this young maid abide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 865
 
ABJECT............2
On abject Caesars - not the stoutest band To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 12
What abject things, what mockeries must ye be, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 101
 
ABLAZE............1
Poor skull, thy fingers set ablaze , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 43
 
ABLE..............3
Able to face an owl's, they still are dight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 10
Have I been able to endure that voice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 299
to behold. The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
ABLUTION..........1
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 6
 
ABODE.............1
Cynthia! where art thou now? What far abode Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 72
 
ABODES............1
Among the abodes of mortals here below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 628
 
ABOUND............2
I will tell thee my blisses, which richly abound On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 19
I too have my blisses, which richly abound On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 43
 
ABOVE.............56
So fled thy soul into the realms above , As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 4
Above the ingrate world and human fears. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 12
The little chapel with the cross above Calidore: A Fragment, Line 42
And sports with half his tail above the waves. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 52
Above the ocean-waves. The stalks, and blades, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 125
Above a cloud, and with a gradual swim I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 114
Thee must I praise above all other glories I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 123
The freshness of the space of heaven above , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 85
So all have set my heavier grief above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 527
And once, above the edges of our nest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 670
Old ditties sigh above their father's grave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 788
When all above was faint with mid-day heat. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 878
Why it is thus, one knows in heaven above : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 128
Disparts a dew-lipp'd rose. Above his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 407
Then heighten'd just above the silvery heads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 603
My breath of life, where art thou? High above , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 687
And sing above this gentle pair, like lark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 720
He saw the giant sea above his head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1023
Above , around, and at his feet; save things Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 121
Cruel enchantress! So above the water Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 413
Sitting upon a rock above the spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 646
Written in star-light on the dark above : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1021
Above the crystal circlings white and clear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 340
Above their heads, and follow them untir'd.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 353
Are visible above : the Seasons four,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 421
Can I prize thee, fair maid, all price above , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 473
But when I came to feel how far above Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 741
Beauty, in things on earth and things above ; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 21
Too high above our head, God of the meridian, Line 10
Two witch's eyes above a cherub's mouth, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 6
A white sail shews above the green-head cliff, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 23
Above some giant, pulsing underground. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 40
Red whortle-berries droop above my head, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 298
And she forgot the blue above the trees, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 418
Not above There was a naughty boy, Line 81
Lifted dry above the main, Not Aladdin magian, Line 17
Your honest countenance all things above , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 34
And shaped and tinted her above all peers. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 4
Above tree tops and towers play, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 62
Forest on forest hung above his head Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 6
Of peaceful sway above man's harvesting, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 110
Above her, on a crag's uneasy shelve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 64
More horrid still. Above a sombre cliff Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 86
Above us in their beauty, and must reign Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 227
Lift their eyes above the bubbles, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 36
All breathing human passion far above , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 28
And, do ye mind, above all things, proclaim Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 70
To the wide-spreaded night above her towers. Lamia, Part I, Line 354
Above the lintel of their chamber door, Lamia, Part II, Line 14
And peaceful sway above man's harvesting, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 415
Above , above What can I do to drive away, Line 21
Above, above What can I do to drive away, Line 21
Ah! if you prize my subdued soul above To Fanny, Line 49
"I know a many Berthas!" "Mine's above The Jealousies, Line 372
Above a pearl-built minster, hovering near; The Jealousies, Line 579
Above the plains of Gobi,- desert, bleak; The Jealousies, Line 659
 
ABROACH...........1
When the barrel's set abroach , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 9
 
ABROAD............16
With convuls'd clenches waving it abroad , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 231
His eyes abroad , to see how shadows shifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 921
Sit thee there, and send abroad , Fancy, Line 25
Abroad and in the homely room; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 68
Who as they walk abroad make tinkling with their feet. Character of C.B., Line 27
And many else were free to roam abroad , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 31
Then Thea spread abroad her trembling arms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 89
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad Ode to a Nightingale, Line 57
I think I have a better fame abroad . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
For couriers are abroad to seek you out. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 124
I see how far the slander is abroad . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 41
Which, lifting sweet abroad its timid green, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
Yet why do I delay to spread abroad Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 152
But lets it sometimes pace abroad majestical, Lamia, Part II, Line 59
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find To Autumn, Line 13
They are no birds when eagles are abroad . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 192
 
ABRUPT............5
Of abrupt thunder, when Ionian shoals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 310
With all its lines abrupt and angular: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 228
Abrupt in middle air? Yet earthward bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 653
Abrupt , in middle air, his way was lost; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 656
As griev'd to force it on you so abrupt ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 71
 
ABSENCE...........5
And so long absence from thee doth bereave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 775
Of a poor three hours' absence ? but we'll gain Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 205
How her short absence might be unsurmised, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 341
And for your absence may I guess the cause? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 67
For thine imperial absence ? Pho! I can The Jealousies, Line 534
 
ABSENT............1
O pardon me - I'm absent now and then. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 20
 
ABSOLUTION........1
Letting her absolution pass O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 29
 
ABSORB'D..........1
Came the amazement, that, absorb'd in it, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 248
 
ABSORBS...........1
Some hungry spell that loveliness absorbs ; Lamia, Part II, Line 259
 
ABYSM.............2
And down some swart abysm he had gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 376
To watch the abysm -birth of elements. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 28
 
ABYSS.............4
Alone preserved me from the drear abyss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 904
Curves hugely: now, far in the deep abyss , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 232
My strange love came - Felicity's abyss ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 176
A Seraph chosen from the bright abyss Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 317
 
ABYSSINIA.........1
I saw parch'd Abyssinia rouse and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 259
 
ACCENT............5
The soul delighted on each accent dwells,- Ode to Apollo, Line 15
Eas'd in one accent his o'er-burden'd soul, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 229
In human accent : ' Potent goddess! chief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 539
Of accent feminine, so courteous." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 215
And dolorous accent from a tragic harp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 444
 
ACCENTING.........1
Would come in this-like accenting ; how frail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 352
 
ACCENTS...........6
Nor listen to accents that, almost adoring, To Some Ladies, Line 3
Mid-way between our homes:- your accents bland To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 122
Most fondly lipp'd, and then these accents came: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 964
Knelt to receive those accents halcyon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 923
At these voluptuous accents , he arose, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 317
Would come in these like accents ; O how frail Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 50
 
ACCEPT............1
Will't please your Highness enter, and accept Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 77
 
ACCLAIM...........1
When 'mid acclaim , and feasts, and garlands gay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 888
 
ACCOMPLISH'D......2
These things accomplish'd :- If he utterly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 696
Bright eyes, accomplish'd shape, and lang'rous waist! The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 4
 
ACCOMPLISHED......1
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished . The two first books, and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
ACCOMPLISHMENT....1
A full accomplishment ! The thing is done, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 18
 
ACCORD............1
But one, whose gentleness did well accord Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 395
 
ACCORDING.........2
Let me behold, according as thou said'st, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 289
Soon as ( according to his promises) The Jealousies, Line 127
 
ACCORDS...........1
That with its tyrant temper best accords , Ode to Apollo, Line 28
 
ACCOUNT...........2
To their spirit's perch, their being's high account , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 14
"But how shall I account , illustrious fay! The Jealousies, Line 533
 
ACCOUNTED.........1
And they shall be accounted poet kings Sleep and Poetry, Line 267
 
ACCOUNTS..........1
Why were they proud? Because red-lin'd accounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 125
 
ACCURSED..........2
And 'scape at once from Hope's accursed bands; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 230
Accursed , blasted! O, thou golden crown, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 78
 
ACHE..............9
How chang'd, how full of ache , how gone in woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 80
All my thirst for sweet heart- ache ! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 29
It made sad Isabella's eyelids ache , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 327
To think how they may ache in icy hoods and mails. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 18
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 279
And grinn'd as all his ugliness did ache , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 49
Oft made Hyperion ache . His palace bright, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 176
I ache to think on't. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 13b
Make great Hyperion ache . His palace bright, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 24
 
ACHED.............2
And ached for wings, because I knew the three: Ode on Indolence, Line 24
I ached to see what things the hollow brain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 276
 
ACHES.............2
It aches in loneliness - is ill at peace Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 220
My heart aches , and a drowsy numbness pains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 1
 
ACHIEVE...........1
His name upon the harp-string, should achieve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 725
 
ACHIEVEMENT.......1
Say, I intreat thee, what achievement high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 714
 
ACHILLES..........1
Achilles by the hair and bent his neck; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 29
 
ACHING............13
While I kiss to the melody, aching all through. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 24
With aching neck and swimming eyes, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 55
One hand she press'd upon that aching spot Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 42
O aching time! O moments big as years! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 64
In fearless yet in aching ignorance? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 107
Bidding adieu; and aching Pleasure nigh, Ode on Melancholy, Line 23
With such an aching heart, such swooning throbs Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
With pleasant weight, the amorous- aching earth, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
Upon her aching forehead be there hung Lamia, Part II, Line 223
He sank supine beside the aching ghost. Lamia, Part II, Line 294
One hand she press'd upon that aching spot The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 344
Let once again these aching arms be placed, What can I do to drive away, Line 50
As when with ravished, aching , vassal eyes, To Fanny, Line 14
 
ACORNS............1
Acorns ripe down-pattering, Fancy, Line 65
 
ACQUAINT..........1
And long he travers'd to and fro, to acquaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 269
 
ACQUIESCENCE......1
So smile acquiescence , and give me thy hand, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 19
 
ACROSS............19
Like to streaks across the sky, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 10
Across the lake; sequester'd leafy glades, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 47
Like silver streaks across a dolphin's fin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 50
Across the lawny fields, and pebbly water; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 88
Slowly across the chequer'd shadows pass. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 68
A little cloud would move across the blue. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 88
Stretching across a void, then guiding o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 600
From eve to morn across the firmament. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 146
And in that agony, across my grief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 411
His fingers went across it - All were mute Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1003
Across the gold autumn's whole kingdoms of corn? Apollo to the Graces, Line 6
There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 1
Ring-doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
A cloud across the moon,- the lights bring in! Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 46
She linger'd still. Meantime, across the moors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 74
A pallid gleam across his features stern: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 349
Across the teaboard draws a long wet mark. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 13
Steady thy laden head across a brook; To Autumn, Line 20
She frown'd; a monstrous owl across us flies The Jealousies, Line 655
 
ACT...............6
women." Terence's Eunuch. Act 2. Sc. 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
For a mere act of duty. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 181a
So act the lion with this silly gnat? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 223
Apollo's presence when in act to strike Lamia, Part II, Line 79
Cried I, with act adorant at her feet, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 283
And ears act with that pleasant unison of sense The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 442
 
ACTING............1
Was acting , that could give so dread a stress The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 279
 
ACTION............3
Or word, or look, or action of despair. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 40
In will, in action free, companionship, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 210
With hope that gloss of words, or suppliant action , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 128
 
ACTIONS...........2
Actions of rage and passion; even as Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 333
Not trenching on our actions personal. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 13
 
ACTS..............3
And all those acts which Deity supreme Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 111
A Tragedy in Five Acts Otho the Great, Subtitle
And all those acts which deity supreme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 416
 
ACUTEST...........1
Revolve these facts in your acutest mood, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 35
 
ADAM'S............1
From Pyrrha's pebbles or old Adam's seed. Lamia, Part I, Line 333
 
ADAMANTINE........1
With fervour seize their adamantine lyres, Ode to Apollo, Line 5
 
ADD...............1
Through sunny air. Add too, the sweetness Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 23
 
ADDER.............1
Adder -eyed Dusketha, speak, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 67
 
ADDER'S...........1
The leaves of willow and of adder's tongue; Lamia, Part II, Line 224
 
ADDING............1
Into his mantle, adding wings to haste, Lamia, Part I, Line 367
 
ADIEU.............33
Adieu , valiant Eric! with joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 41
Be lull'd with songs of mine. Fair world, adieu ! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 103
Why westward turn? 'Twas but to say adieu ! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 141
And weep? Or did ye wholly bid adieu Sleep and Poetry, Line 215
Thou shouldst mount up to with me. Now adieu ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 578
Adieu , sweet love, adieu!' - As shot stars fall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 600
Adieu, sweet love, adieu !' - As shot stars fall, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 600
Adieu to Ganges and their pleasant fields! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 33
No more delight - I bid adieu to all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 141
Adieu , my daintiest Dream! although so vast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 656
And bid a long adieu ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 763a
Why stand we here? Adieu , ye tender pair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 902
Adieu !" Whereat those maidens, with wild stare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 903
But at the setting I must bid adieu Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 932
Adieu ! for, once again, the fierce dispute On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 5
The Spirit mourn'd " Adieu !"- dissolv'd, and left Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 321
Their lips touch'd not, but had not bade adieu , Ode to Psyche, Line 17
Make your best bow to her and bid adieu ; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 13
Adieu ! the fancy cannot cheat so well Ode to a Nightingale, Line 73
Adieu ! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Ode to a Nightingale, Line 75
Adieu! adieu ! thy plaintive anthem fades Ode to a Nightingale, Line 75
Your leaves, nor ever bid the spring adieu ; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 22
Bidding adieu ; and aching Pleasure nigh, Ode on Melancholy, Line 23
So, ye three ghosts, adieu ! Ye cannot raise Ode on Indolence, Line 51
Adieu - adieu - I fly, adieu! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 17
Adieu - adieu - I fly, adieu! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 17
Adieu - adieu - I fly, adieu ! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 17
Adieu , adieu! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 19
Adieu, adieu ! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 19
Now - one adieu for Albert!- Come away! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 60
It cannot be - adieu !" So said, she rose Lamia, Part I, Line 286
Adieu ! adieu! I'm off for Angle-land! The Jealousies, Line 599
Adieu! adieu ! I'm off for Angle-land! The Jealousies, Line 599
 
ADIEUS............3
Faint fare-thee-wells, and sigh-shrilled adieus !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 690
'Mong which it gurgled blythe adieus , to mock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 938
Let me sob over thee my last adieus , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 587
 
ADIEUX............1
When adieux have grown old and goodbyes Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 3
 
ADMINISTER........1
Fit time be chosen to administer . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 5
 
ADMIRAL...........2
On the admiral staff - and to philosophize Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 73
That since belong'd to Admiral De Witt, The Jealousies, Line 416
 
ADMIRAL'S.........1
About the great Athenian admiral's mast? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 23
 
ADMIRATION........3
To turn my admiration , though unpossess'd Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 20
To admiration . But to be a favorite- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 46
They hold the Emperor in admiration . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Second Lady, Line 16
 
ADMIRE............2
To admire the visor arched so gracefully Calidore: A Fragment, Line 130
Can I admire how crystal-smooth it felt, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 383
 
ADMIRED...........1
Admired it with a connoisseuring look, The Jealousies, Line 417
 
ADMIRING..........1
Of all the realm, admiring of his deeds. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 56
 
ADMITTED..........1
Such things as thou art are admitted oft The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 178
 
ADMONITIONS.......1
Of admonitions to the winds and seas, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 109
 
ADO...............2
So, without more ado , Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 16
"Do put them out, and, without more ado , The Jealousies, Line 483
 
ADON'.............1
The endless sleep of this new-born Adon' , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 554
 
ADONIAN...........1
The Adonian feast; whereof she saw no more, Lamia, Part I, Line 320
 
ADONIS............3
That same Adonis , safe in the privacy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 479
Pigeons and doves: Adonis something mutter'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 497
Cupid well-natured, my Adonis kind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 919
 
ADONIS'...........1
On soft Adonis' shoulders, made him still Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 521
 
ADORANT...........1
Cried I, with act adorant at her feet, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 283
 
ADORATION.........3
My sudden adoration , my great love! Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 7
From adoration , and my foolish tongue Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
Due adoration , thus began to adore; Lamia, Part I, Line 255
 
ADORE.............7
Heavens! how desperately do I adore Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 10
We sing, and we adore ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 967
I cannot choose but kneel here and adore . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 302
He could not help but kiss her and adore . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 455
Due adoration, thus began to adore ; Lamia, Part I, Line 255
But wept alone those days, for why should she adore ? Lamia, Part I, Line 321
In the clear panel, more he could adore ,- The Jealousies, Line 277
 
ADORED............1
Pearls, while on land they wither'd and adored . Lamia, Part I, Line 16
 
ADORING...........2
Nor listen to accents that, almost adoring , To Some Ladies, Line 3
Full of adoring tears and blandishment, Lamia, Part I, Line 135
 
ADORINGS..........1
And soft adorings from their loves receive The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 48
 
ADORN.............2
Roses, and pinks, and violets, to adorn To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 7
That time thou didst adorn , with amber studs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 924
 
ADORNED...........1
Or, for such trifles, rob th' adorned world Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 88
 
ADORNING..........1
Adorning bondage with the pleasant gloss King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 51
 
ADORNMENT.........1
For meet adornment a full thousand years; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 2
 
ADOWN.............6
He sinks adown a solitary glen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 77
Those two sad streams adown a fearful dell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1009
"I saw Osirian Egypt kneel adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 257
Her brother kiss'd her too, and knelt adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 998
And Peggy too - adown the glen Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 23
No sooner thought of than adown he lay, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 92
 
ADVANCE...........1
I will advance a terrible right arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 248
 
ADVANCING.........1
( advancing from the back of the stage, whither he had Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
 
ADVANTAGE.........1
Advantage of your chance discoveries Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 116
 
ADVENTURE.........1
Great Emperor! to adventure , like a lover true." The Jealousies, Line 486
 
ADVENTURESOME.....1
And now at once, adventuresome , I send Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 58
 
ADVENTUROUS.......1
Adventurous knights take up their dinted shields: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 4
 
ADVERSE...........1
Where lions tug adverse , if love grow not Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 100
 
ADVERTISE.........1
He dies! 'Tis well she do not advertise Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 14
 
ADVICE............1
Sage advice ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 24b
 
ADVICES...........2
No more advices , no more cautioning; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 1
With good advices ; and I here remain, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 10
 
ADVISE............1
Yet you were about to advise more,- I listen. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 28
 
ADVISED...........1
Advised , not school'd, I would be, and henceforth King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 14
 
ADVISERS..........1
To sage advisers let me ever bend King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 10
 
AEAEA'S...........1
Aeaea's isle was wondering at the moon:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 415
 
AEOLIAN...........3
'Tis still! - Wild warblings from the AEolian lyre Ode to Apollo, Line 34
And young AEolian harps personified, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 18
Could e'er have touch'd there. Sounds AEolian Lamia, Part I, Line 386
 
AERIAL............3
In elegant, pure, and aerial minds. To Some Ladies, Line 28
Perhaps to see shapes of light, aerial lymning, Sleep and Poetry, Line 33
So happy was he, not the aerial blowing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 552
 
AERIE.............1
In gulf or aerie , mountains or deep dells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 94
 
AETHON............1
Heaven's gates, and Aethon snort his morning gold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 364
 
AETNA'S...........1
Or of old AEtna's pulpy wine-presses, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 123
 
AFAR..............7
Brightening the half veil'd face of heaven afar : To Hope, Line 45
While the trumpets sound afar ; Ode to Apollo, Line 10
Of human hearts: for lo! I see afar , Sleep and Poetry, Line 125
Up went the hum celestial. High afar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 581
Leading afar past wild magnificence, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 598
Let my foes choke, and my friends shout afar , Lamia, Part II, Line 62
Beheld afar off, in the hooded shade The Jealousies, Line 660
 
AFFAIR............2
You far outstrip my spleen in this affair . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 99
"Monstrous affair ! Pshaw! pah! what ugly minx The Jealousies, Line 163
 
AFFAIRS...........1
In their affairs , requiring trusty hands. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 228
 
AFFECT............2
Here's a true churchman! he'd affect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 37
Do not affect amazement, hypocrite, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 160
 
AFFECTION.........3
While whisperings of affection Calidore: A Fragment, Line 84
How glorious this affection for the cause Addressed to Haydon, Line 9
Of sisterly affection . Can I want Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 473
 
AFFECTIONATE......1
And that affectionate light, those diamond things, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 717
 
AFFLICT...........1
Iced in the great lakes, to afflict mankind; What can I do to drive away, Line 38
 
AFFLICTED.........2
Knows thee not, thus afflicted , for a God; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 56
Knows thee not, so afflicted , for a God; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 358
 
AFFORDS...........1
Against his lineage: not one breast affords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 88
 
AFFRAY............1
Affray his ears, though but in dying tone:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 260
 
AFFRAYED..........1
Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 296
 
AFFRIGHT..........6
Affright - Spenser. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Keats's note to Line 6
Affright you? Did our old lamenting Thames Sleep and Poetry, Line 212
Affright this lethargy! I cannot quell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 769
More wildering than all that hoarse affright ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 528
"Ah! why wilt thou affright a feeble soul? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 154
It might affright him, fill him with suspicion Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 54
 
AFFRIGHTED........4
Indeed I am - thwarted, affrighted , chidden, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 753
Affrighted do we gaze God of the meridian, Line 11
By her affrighted servants. Next day, hous'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 72
Affrighted , kept her still, and let him pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 99
 
AFLOAT............1
Afloat , and pillowing up the majesty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 999
 
AFRAID............8
Came blushing, waning, willing, and afraid , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 635
My foolish tongue, and listening, half afraid , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 960
Most delicate, as though afraid to smutch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 90
Stifle thine heart no more;- nor be afraid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 979
As dancingly as thine. Be not afraid , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 307
Nor afraid There was a naughty boy, Line 66
And where the very brooks as if afraid When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 7
And still the cup was full,- while he, afraid Lamia, Part I, Line 253
 
AFRESH............2
Open afresh your round of starry folds, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 47
Put her new lips to his, and gave afresh Lamia, Part I, Line 294
 
AFRIC'S...........1
Beneath the waves like Afric's ebony, Imitation of Spenser, Line 17
 
AFRICAN...........1
Son of the old moon-mountains African ! To the Nile, Line 1
 
AFTER.............66
And after parting beds of simple flowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 6
After a night of some quaint jubilee To George Felton Mathew, Line 27
With after times.- The patriot shall feel To My Brother George (epistle), Line 73
No, nor when supper came, nor after that,- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 119
Yeaned in after times, when we are flown, Sleep and Poetry, Line 257
Thought after thought to nourish up the flame Sleep and Poetry, Line 398
After dark vapours have oppressed our plains After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 1
For thee in after years. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 12
With ebon-tipped flutes: close after these, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 147
And after him his sacred vestments swept. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 152
Their share of the ditty. After them appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 163
And, after lifting up his aged hands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 195
Many might after brighter visions stare: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 346
After the Argonauts, in blind amaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 347
And, ever after , through those regions be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 383
Seems all this poor endeavour after fame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 847
Hour after hour, to each lush-leav'd rill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 52
After long toil and travelling, to miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 145
After a thousand mazes overgone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 387
And after , straight in that inspired place Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 837
Swifter than centaurs after rapine bent.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 536
My soul page after page, till well-nigh won Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 680
After some warm delight, that seems to perch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 64
Didst thou not after other climates call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 142
Night after night, and day by day, until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 856
So after my own heart! I knew, I knew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 881
Or like one who, in after ages, knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 891
After a little sleep: or when in mine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 893
His eyes went after them, until they got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 905
Leave to an after time Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 25
After its airy maze- God of the meridian, Line 12
Night after night, when Phoebus was away, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 7
O fret not after knowledge - I have none, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 9
O fret not after knowledge - I have none, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 11
After some beauty veiled far-away, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 4
Too much of pity after they are dead, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 92
Time after time, to quiet her. Their crimes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 261
And, after looking round the champaign wide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 347
After the pilgrim in his wanderings, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 493
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
After so many hours of toil and quest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 338
The Beadsman, after thousand aves told, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 377
But after water-brooks this pilgrim's soul Character of C.B., Line 16
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 24
After the full completion of fair day,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 191
That fell, one after one, yet all at once, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 283
That, after such a merry battle fought, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 14
After whose spurring heels he sent me forth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 13
His crowded state after the victory. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 93
After that, say and do whate'er you please. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 111
And be no more remember'd after death, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 267
After my health, intreating, if I please, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 37
After the page's story of the death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 4
And, after not long, thirsted, for thereby The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 41
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 329
Of change, hour after hour I curs'd myself: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 399
After the full completion of fair day, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 35
Is't madness or a hunger after death King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 14
Where, after a long hypercritic howl The Jealousies, Line 91
That after marriage too, she never joy'd The Jealousies, Line 112
Or kiss thine eyes, or count thy locks, tress after tress?" The Jealousies, Line 171
And the next after that shall see him neck'd, The Jealousies, Line 196
The monster's always after something new," The Jealousies, Line 545
Gentlemen pensioners next; and after them, The Jealousies, Line 586
"Five minutes thirteen seconds after three, The Jealousies, Line 676
In after time a sage of mickle lore, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 1
 
AFTERWARDS........2
The enchantment that afterwards befel? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 573
For truth's sake, what woe afterwards befel, Lamia, Part I, Line 395


Published @ RC

March 2005