Ag-Al - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
AGAINST...........83
And that bright lance, against the fretted wall, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 37
Against all doubtings, and will keep alive Sleep and Poetry, Line 160
Paw up against the light, and do strange deeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 166
That lean against a streamlet's rushy banks, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 62
Patting against the sorrel as she goes. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 98
Fair dewy roses brush against our faces, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 133
Come cool and suddenly against his face, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 6
For Hero's cheek and smiles against her smile. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 11
His early song against yon breezy sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 221
Peona's busy hand against his lips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 444
Thy deathful bow against some deer-herd bent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 511
Its beams against the zodiac-lion cast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 553
Her very cheek against my crowned lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 662
Against the enchased crocodile, or leaps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 714
Of grasshoppers against the sun. She weeps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 715
Than speak against this ardent listlessness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 825
Bear up against it: so farewel, sad sigh; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 974
And when, more near against the marble cold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 265
A rough-voic'd war against the dooming stars. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 864
Against an endless storm. Moreover too, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 883
Against his pallid face: he felt the charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 105
She whisk'd against their eyes the sooty oil. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 521
Naked and sabre-like against my heart. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 557
Toss'd up the silver spume against the clouds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 655
Against that hell-born Circe. The crew had gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 665
My eyes against the heavens, and read again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 683
His wand against the empty air times nine.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 753
This wand against yon lyre on the pedestal." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 765
Presumptuous against love, against the sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 639
Presumptuous against love, against the sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 639
Against all elements, against the tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 640
Against all elements, against the tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 640
Of mortals each to each, against the blooms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 641
Of heroes gone! Against his proper glory Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 643
His hands against his face, and then did rest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 917
His heart beat awfully against his side; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 42
Keeps head against the freshets. Sick and wan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 213
Thy face - I sin against thy native skies. On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 14
Full hard against the moon. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 16
And rub your flinty back against it - budge! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 50
And yet one day, against his oath, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 21
Against his lineage: not one breast affords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 88
Against the window-panes; St. Agnes' moon hath set. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
And slant book full against the glare. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 72
And rubb'd his sides against the mossed bark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 85
He breath'd fierce breath against the sleepy portals, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 266
Of son against his sire. I saw him fall, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 322
Against these plagues he strove in vain; for Fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 96
One against one, or two, or three, or all Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 142
Each several one against the other three, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 143
Drown both, and press them both against earth's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 145
Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 28
Against the Emperor had suborn'd his son,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38
I strove against thee and my hot-blood son, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 21
That they, against the winter of thy sire, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 29
Its threatening edge against a good king's quiet; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
Sullen against the wind! If in two angry brows Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 58
Hard penalties against thee, if't be found Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
Against the spotless nature and clear fame Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 132
Prevail against my fury. Damned priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 170
Of any proof against the honourableness Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 213
More than against a night-mare, which a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 233
Against Erminia. Silent? Be so still; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
Against me, who would sooner crush and grind Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 163
My wrath against thee for the orbed world. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 91
Oh! thou good man, against whose sacred head Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 140
Against his better self, he took delight Lamia, Part II, Line 73
Upon the grass I struggled hard against The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 53
Were shut against the sunrise evermore. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 86
Against rebellion: this old image here, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 224
Loves to beat up against a tyrannous blast, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 30
How dare, against a man disarm'd? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 20b
Shall I, when I have sworn against it, sir? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 27
Dear mistress, let him have no handle against you! The Jealousies, Line 54
Who raked up ev'ry fact against the dead,) The Jealousies, Line 89
Against the vicious manners of the age, The Jealousies, Line 92
Against this highland princess, rating her The Jealousies, Line 105
Nor till fit time against her fame wage battle. The Jealousies, Line 120
"I'll put a mark against some rebel names, The Jealousies, Line 137
Against the Emperor's wedding;- and, sir, this The Jealousies, Line 284
It goes against your conscience - good! Well, don't. The Jealousies, Line 462
Came sudden 'fore my face, and brush'd against my hat. The Jealousies, Line 675
Against that ugly piece of calumny, The Jealousies, Line 746
 
AGAPE.............3
Star'd at the Fool, the Fool was all agape ; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 19
To set the silly sort o' the world agape , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 145
The world is all agape to see dragg'd forth Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 68
 
AGE...............17
Upon the forehead of the age to come; Addressed to the Same, Line 10
And a whole age of lingering moments crept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 915
To nurse the golden age 'mong shepherd clans: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 896
Who had not from mid-life to utmost age Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 228
Disabled age shall seize thee; and even then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 595
O that a week could be an age , and we To J.R., Line 1
Of holy Mark from youth to age ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 90
Cool'd a long age in the deep-delved earth, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 12
When old age shall this generation waste, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 46
O, for an age so shelter'd from annoy, Ode on Indolence, Line 38
And a nice judge in the age and smack of wine. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 11
To these fair children, stars of a new age ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 22
No rheumed eyes, no furrowing of age , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 82
twenty-five years of age , that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
By this last temple, by the golden age , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 285
Against the vicious manners of the age , The Jealousies, Line 92
Sent as a present, while yet under age , The Jealousies, Line 183
 
AGE'S.............1
So saying, this young soul in age's mask Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 310
 
AGED..............21
Or rob from aged Lear his bitter teen: Imitation of Spenser, Line 22
From the quaint mossiness of aged roots: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 40
His aged head, crowned with beechen wreath, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 159
And, after lifting up his aged hands, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 195
Where sat Endymion and the aged priest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 357
The disappointment. Time, that aged nurse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 705
Around thine aged top, and thy clear fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 722
A cloak of blue wrapp'd up his aged bones, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 197
He spake, and walking to that aged form, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 281
Thou shalt not go the way of aged men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 596
And many other juts of aged stone Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 47
Resolv'd, she took with her an aged nurse, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 343
How she doth whisper to that aged Dame, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 346
God rest her aged bones somewhere- Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 29
Flatter'd to tears this aged man and poor; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 21
Ah, happy chance! the aged creature came, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 91
Like puzzled urchin on an aged crone The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 129
To follow her; with aged eyes aghast The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 184
She turn'd, and down the aged gossip led The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 195
Nor did he know each aged watchman's beat, Character of C.B., Line 24
Through aged boughs, that yielded like the mist Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 156
 
AGENTS............1
A thousand willing agents to obey, Sleep and Poetry, Line 239
 
AGES..............4
Who have left streaks of light athwart their ages : To George Felton Mathew, Line 60
In other ages - cold and sacred busts Sleep and Poetry, Line 357
Or like one who, in after ages , knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 891
And they are gone: ay, ages long ago The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 370
 
AGHAST............3
He did not rave, he did not stare aghast , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 588
Of tangled wonder, breathless and aghast . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 655
To follow her; with aged eyes aghast The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 184
 
AGNES.............3
Save to St. Agnes and her lambs unshorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 71
"St. Agnes ! Ah! it is St. Agnes' Eve- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 118
In fancy, fair St. Agnes in her bed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 233
 
AGNES'............11
St. Agnes' Eve - Ah, bitter chill it was! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 1
His was harsh penance on St. Agnes' Eve: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 24
On love, and wing'd St. Agnes' saintly care, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 44
They told her how, upon St. Agnes' Eve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 46
She sigh'd for Agnes' dreams, the sweetest of the year. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 63
When they St. Agnes' wool are weaving piously." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 117
"St. Agnes! Ah! it is St. Agnes' Eve- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 118
To see thee, Porphyro!- St. Agnes' Eve! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 123
When Madeline, St. Agnes' charmed maid, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 192
Open thine eyes, for meek St. Agnes' sake, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
Against the window-panes; St. Agnes' moon hath set. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 324
 
AGO...............9
Where long ago a giant battle was; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 792
Not of these days, but long ago 'twas told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 830
Aye, thus it was one thousand years ago . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 326
I dreamed long ago . Now new begun, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 4
Toward the castle or the cot where long ago was born There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 11
And they are gone: ay, ages long ago The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 370
As one I knew some passed weeks ago , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 41
Aye, an hour ago , my brilliant queen! What can I do to drive away, Line 3
As he retired, an hour ago I wis, The Jealousies, Line 286
 
AGONE.............2
O Tartarus! but some few days agone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 269
She died full long agone ! Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 30
 
AGONIES...........4
Where I may find the agonies , the strife Sleep and Poetry, Line 124
It is no reason why such agonies And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 13
Writhe at defeat, and nurse your agonies ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 174
Majesties, sovran voices, agonies , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 115
 
AGONIZE...........1
Could agonize me more than baby-words Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 314
 
AGONY.............7
Tortures hot breath, and speech of agony , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 257
Until 'twas too fierce agony to bear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 410
And in that agony , across my grief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 411
A sound of moan, an agony of sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 485
At this, through all his bulk an agony Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 259
Who feel the giant agony of the world; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 157
Shook with her agony , till fair were seen The Jealousies, Line 395
 
AGREE.............1
This learned doctor will agree with me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 29
 
AGREED............1
As hard as lips can make it: till agreed , Sleep and Poetry, Line 109
 
AGREEING..........1
Who joys to see us with his gifts agreeing , Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 33
 
AGUE..............1
From winter's ague , for one hour's gleam; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 6
 
AGUES.............1
His poor guide hurried back with agues in her brain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 189
 
AGUISH............3
The storm, and through chill aguish gloom outburst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 675
And daisies on the aguish hills. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 12
Out, ye aguish fairies, out! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER,
 
AID...............6
Yet this is vain - O Mathew, lend thy aid To George Felton Mathew, Line 53
So once more days and nights aid me along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 42
Fearless for power of thought, without thine aid ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 361
And thou shalt aid - hast thou not aided me? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 775
In aid soft warble from the Dorian flute; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 12
Without the aid of love; yet in content Lamia, Part I, Line 314
 
AIDED.............1
And thou shalt aid - hast thou not aided me? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 775
 
AIDS..............1
I turn full hearted to the friendly aids Sleep and Poetry, Line 316
 
AIL...............2
O what can ail thee, knight at arms, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 1
O what can ail thee, knight at arms, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 5
 
AILMENT...........1
Tell me thine ailment : tell me all amiss!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 519
 
AILS..............3
What ails thee?" He could bear no more, and so Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 846
Such beauty once again.- What ails you, lady? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 13
Well? What ails thee, child? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 115a
 
AIM...............5
Oft may be found a "singleness of aim ," Addressed to Haydon, Line 6
The end and aim of Poesy. 'Tis clear Sleep and Poetry, Line 293
Then there were fauns and satyrs taking aim Sleep and Poetry, Line 360
To one, who keeps within his steadfast aim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 848
Her wild and timid nature to his aim : Lamia, Part II, Line 71
 
AIR...............124
Of the omnipotent Father, cleavest the air , As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 12
With daring Milton through the fields of air : Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 11
When, like a cloud, he sits upon the air , To Hope, Line 15
To sigh out sonnets to the midnight air ! To Hope, Line 28
Float along the pleased air , Ode to Apollo, Line 37
The dying tones that fill the air , Ode to Apollo, Line 45
Responsive to sylphs, in the moon beamy air . To Some Ladies, Line 12
The air is all softness, and chrystal the streams, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 3
Through sunny air . Add too, the sweetness Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 23
Athwart the morning air : some lady sweet, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 13
That float about the air on azure wings, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 74
In water, earth, or air , but poesy. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 22
In air he sees white coursers paw, and prance, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 26
Full joy I feel, while thus I cleave the air , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 107
To feel the air that plays about the hills, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 90
The air that floated by me seem'd to say To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 99
Yet feel I little of the cool bleak air , Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 5
That breathes about us in the vacant air ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 31
Yield from thy sanctuary some clear air , Sleep and Poetry, Line 56
A pigeon tumbling in clear summer air ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 93
May fan the cool air gently o'er my rest; Sleep and Poetry, Line 112
Lifts its sweet head into the air , and feeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 250
The air was cooling, and so very still, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 2
Far round the horizon's crystal air to skim, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 17
From out the middle air , from flowery nests, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 187
Queen of the wide air ; thou most lovely queen I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 205
Watching the silent air ; God of the golden bow, Line 26
Or from your swelling downs, where sweet air stirs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 201
The scrip, with needments, for the mountain air ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 208
That lingered in the air like dying rolls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 309
Uplifting his strong bow into the air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 345
And nothing since has floated in the air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 496
Into a warmer air : a moment more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 664
Unto the temperate air : then high it soar'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 86
That they are still the air , the subtle food, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 157
From thy blue throne, now filling the air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 171
Dear goddess, help! or the wide-gaping air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 194
Cool grass, nor tasted the fresh slumberous air ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 290
What smoothest air thy smoother forehead woos? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 306
So from the arbour roof down swell'd an air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 513
Blue heaven, and a silver car, air -borne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 518
Abrupt in middle air ? Yet earthward bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 653
Abrupt, in middle air , his way was lost; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 656
He threw himself, and just into the air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 711
He sang the story up into the air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 838
Into sweet air ; and sober'd morning came Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 115
Left sudden by a dallying breath of air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 117
Went through the dismal air like one huge Python Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 530
Or give me to the air , or let me die! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 542
And merely given to the cold bleak air . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 553
To search the book, and in the warming air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 677
His wand against the empty air times nine.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 753
Of gladness in the air - while many, who Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 792
Disclos'd the thunder-gloomings in Jove's air ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 872
The delicatest air : air verily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 882
The delicatest air: air verily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 882
This palace floor breath- air ,- but for the amaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 884
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 3
Of native air - let me but die at home." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 37
Into a whirlpool. Vanish into air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 53
Will mingle kindly with the meadow air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 83
The other's fierceness. Through the air they flew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 347
This is the giddy air , and I must spread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 355
And on those pinions, level in mid air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 403
And air , and pains, and care, and suffering; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 432
Their wings chivalrous into the clear air , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 482
Dissolve the frozen purity of air ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 586
And air of visions, and the monstrous swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 652
To the void air , bidding them find out love: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 740
Fly in the air where his had never been- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 796
Good visions in the air ,- whence will befal, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 830
And let me breathe into the happy air , Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 4
Parting they seem'd to tread upon the air , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 73
Spreading her perfect arms upon the air , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 239
The last in air , the former in the deep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 11
Eagles may seem to sleep wing-wide upon the air ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 19
Filling the air , as on we move, with portraiture intense, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 35
To spirits of the air , and visions wide: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 202
And moving with demurest air The Eve of St. Mark, Line 17
Its light balloons into the summer air ; Character of C.B., Line 5
Panted, and all his food was woodland air , Character of C.B., Line 17
Like cloud on cloud. No stir of air was there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 7
Has from thy sceptre pass'd; and all the air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 58
As if the ebbing air had but one wave; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 78
Space region'd with life- air ; and barren void; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 119
And made his hands to struggle in the air , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 136
Hyperion slid into the rustled air , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 2
For when the Muse's wings are air -ward spread, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 82
Leave the dinn'd air vibrating silverly. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 128
Of element, earth, water, air , and fire,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 140
As fire with air loud warring when rain-floods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 144
Let the rose glow intense and warm the air , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 15
Feel curs'd and thwarted, when the liegeless air Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 92
Fragrant air ! Delicious light! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 2
Of chilly rain, and shivering air . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 22
Holy the air , the water, and the fire; Ode to Psyche, Line 39
To take into the air my quiet breath; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 54
This Conrad's gates, to the wide air again. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 84
Thee to melt in the visionary air , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 85
Or through the air thou pioneerest me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 27
Through the dark ways they chose to the open air ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 125
Escap'd?- fled?- vanish'd? melted into air ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 24
You have escap'd me, free as the dusk air , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
Upon the terrace; the refreshing air Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 60
Where is your hand, father?- what sultry air ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 193
As Proserpine still weeps for her Sicilian air . Lamia, Part I, Line 63
Free as the air , invisibly, she strays Lamia, Part I, Line 94
And in the air , her new voice luting soft, Lamia, Part I, Line 167
What taste of purer air hast thou to soothe Lamia, Part I, Line 282
Soft went the music the soft air along, Lamia, Part II, Line 199
Empty the haunted air , and gnomed mine- Lamia, Part II, Line 236
Like floral-censers swinging light in air ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 27
And fills the air with so much pleasant health The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 100
Was in this shrouded vale, not so much air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 311
Has from thy sceptre pass'd, and all the air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 360
As if the ebbing air had but one wave; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 377
Fills forest dells with a pervading air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 405
Beckon me out into the wintry air . To Fanny, Line 8
Voluptuous visions into the warm air , To Fanny, Line 26
And take the flattering freshness of the air , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 2
There stood, or hover'd, tremulous in the air , The Jealousies, Line 2
Save when, for healthful exercise and air , The Jealousies, Line 43
Through the wide air to Kent this morn I glide!" The Jealousies, Line 527
Sweet in the air a mild-toned music plays, The Jealousies, Line 725
 
AIRILY............1
And virgin's bower, trailing airily ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 417
 
AIRS..............6
Beckon me sternly from soft "Lydian airs ," To George Felton Mathew, Line 18
Scarce can I scribble on; for lovely airs Sleep and Poetry, Line 327
And with these airs come forms of elegance Sleep and Poetry, Line 331
Himself from fireside joys, and Lydian airs , Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 7
With airs delicious. In the greenest nook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 668
And see what hoity-toity airs she took:) The Jealousies, Line 707
 
AIRY..............22
When bright processions took their airy march To George Felton Mathew, Line 29
Gladdening in the free, and airy feel Calidore: A Fragment, Line 139
Its airy swellings, with a gentle wave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 118
So kept me stedfast in that airy trance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 585
Dream within dream!" - "She took an airy range, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 633
Into its airy channels with so subtle, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 750
And soothe thy lips: hist, when the airy stress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 783
Its airy goal, haply some bower veils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 192
Where airy voices lead: so through the hollow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 213
He caught her airy form, thus did he plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 301
And airy cradle, lowly bow'd his face Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 337
In water, fiery realm, and airy bourne; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 31
The while they feel thine airy fellowship. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 55
Pardon me, airy planet, that I prize Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 185
The shepherd's pipe come clear from airy steep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 359
Delicious symphonies, like airy flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 798
Endymion to heaven's airy dome Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 38
Shall airy voices cheat me to the shore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 654
After its airy maze- God of the meridian, Line 12
Thee heave to airy sleep from fathom dreams- To Ailsa Rock, Line 6
Forward he stoop'd over the airy shore, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 356
Whose airy texture, from a golden string, Lamia, Part II, Line 19
 
AISLE.............3
Along the chapel aisle by slow degrees: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 13
While far within each aisle and deep recess, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 196
While, far within each aisle and deep recess, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 40
 
AISLED............2
Golden aisled , built up in heaven, Not Aladdin magian, Line 8
All down the aisled place; and beneath all Lamia, Part II, Line 130
 
AISLES............2
Down sidelong aisles , and into niches old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 264
Through the dark pillars of those sylvan aisles . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 968
 
AJAR..............1
Stands with the door ajar to let him in? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 15
 
AKIN..............2
Its tempering coolness, to my life akin , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 609
She clos'd the door, she panted, all akin The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 201
 
ALABASTER.........1
Comes thine alabaster steed; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 57
 
ALADDIN...........1
Not Aladdin magian Not Aladdin magian, Line 1
 
ALARM.............13
Kept off dismay, and terror, and alarm Calidore: A Fragment, Line 145
As Venus looking sideways in alarm . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 220
Of which the throbs were born. This still alarm , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 357
With the tinge of love, panting in safe alarm .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 314
They stung the feather'd horse: with fierce alarm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 555
Again thou stranger gav'st me fresh alarm - Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 12
See they glisten in alarm , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 7
Then the hurry and alarm Fancy, Line 63
What means this, fair one? Why in such alarm ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 82
Amid the hoarse alarm of Corinth's voice. Lamia, Part II, Line 61
When the time comes, don't feel the least alarm ; The Jealousies, Line 520
While here and there clear trumpets blew a keen alarm . The Jealousies, Line 576
Created an alarm among our troop, The Jealousies, Line 668
 
ALARMED...........1
Full on the alarmed beauty of the bride, Lamia, Part II, Line 247
 
ALARMING..........1
Which never should be used but in alarming cases." The Jealousies, Line 540
 
ALARUM............4
My stern alarum , and unsheath his steel; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 74
Like Love's alarum pattering the sharp sleet The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 323
Makes this alarum in the elements, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 105
Alarum . Enter KING STEPHEN, Knights, and Soldiers. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
 
ALARUMS...........1
[Exeunt. Alarums . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 36
 
ALAS..............43
Alas ! thou this wilt never do: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 65
And that, alas ! is death. No, I can trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 514
This all? Yet it is strange, and sad, alas ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 722
With sighs, and an alas !- Endymion! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 736
Alas ! 'tis his old grief. For many days, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 47
Too long, alas , hast thou starv'd on the ruth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 104
Alas , he finds them dry; and then he foams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 151
With love - he - but alas ! too well I see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 550
Of sudden exaltation: but, " Alas !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 680
And be a criminal. Alas , I burn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 963
And call it love? Alas , 'twas cruelty. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 972
Such utmost beauty? Alas , thou dost pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 74
To more immediate matter. Woe, alas ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 398
Alas , 'tis not for me! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 276
Alas , I must not think - by Phoebe, no! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 303
He flapp'd towards the sound. Alas , no charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 556
" Alas !" said he, "were I but always borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 615
So spake they to their pillows; but, alas , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 31
Alas ! when passion is both meek and wild! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 48
"I am a shadow now, alas ! alas! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 305
"I am a shadow now, alas! alas ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 305
Alas ! I could not choose. Ah! my poor heart, Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 13
Alas , 'tis so with all, when our intent Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 6
Alas ! poor queen! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 19
More tame for his gray hairs - Alas me! flit! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 104
"No dream, alas ! alas! and woe is mine! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 328
"No dream, alas! alas ! and woe is mine! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 328
The first, alas ! poor Dwarf, I understand- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 25
A third time came they by;- alas ! wherefore? Ode on Indolence, Line 41
Alas , poor me! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 99b
Alas ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 74a
Alas ! he must not die! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 57b
You look not so, alas ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 110b
I thought I did. Alas ! I am deceiv'd. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 135
Alas ! poor Prince, I would you knew my heart! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
Do this to the utmost,- though alas ! with me Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 19
Alas ! Alas! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Erminia, Line 167b
Alas! Alas ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Erminia, Line 167b
Alas ! My lord, my lord! they cannot move her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 187
In human climes, and live: Alas ! poor youth, Lamia, Part I, Line 281
" Alas , my friend! your coat sits very well: Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 18
But not for this cause;- alas ! she had more The Jealousies, Line 84
Alas ! my wearied heart within me sinks, The Jealousies, Line 165
 
ALBERT............49
ALBERT , a Knight, favoured by Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 4
What tidings of the battle? Albert ? Ludolph? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 19
Albert ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 61a
You'll not be perjured! Go to Albert then, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 79
You give up Albert to me? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 108a
I would not Albert suffer any wrong. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 110
Look, woman, look, your Albert is quite safe! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 120
Enter ALBERT . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 124
Noble Albert ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 128b
Servants. ALBERT following. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
Well said, Sir Albert . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 93a
Albert , go thou and bear him company. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 156
[Exeunt GERSA and ALBERT , with others. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 160
Yes - it is Albert ; a brave German knight, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 16
Frank, open, generous; Albert I may trust. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 23
Enter ALBERT . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 26b
Albert , will you swear? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 33b
Albert , you have fame to lose. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 34b
Enter ALBERT . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
I marvel, Albert , you delay so long Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 52
Is this clear-headed Albert ? He brain-turn'd! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 64
Albert has surely fail'd me! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 61c
That your knight Albert be brought here before you. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 189
Let Albert straight be summon'd. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 192a
[Enter ALBERT , and the Nobleman. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 207
Here, Albert , this old phantom wants a proof! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 207
Albert , I speak to you as to a man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 209
Albert , I must suspect thee of a crime Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 236
[Exeunt OTHO and Nobles; ALBERT following. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 245a
Albert , wilt thou follow there? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 245b
Albert , thou art the minion! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 260a
[Exeunt all but ALBERT . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 264
Well, suppose this Albert here; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38b
Conrad! Albert ! help! help! What can I do? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 76
How shall I bear my life till Albert comes? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
Albert ! he cannot stickle, chew the cud Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 103
[Goes to the door, listens, and opens it. Enter ALBERT . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 106
Albert , I have been waiting for you here Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 106
Thee pale, my Albert . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 118a
Something has vext you, Albert . There are times Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 122
Albert , you jest; I'm sure you must. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 150b
Remorseless Albert ! Cruel, cruel wretch! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 177
And Albert too has disappear'd; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130b
Enter ALBERT (wounded). Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Albert ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 8a
Albert , you do insult my bride - your mistress- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
[ ALBERT dies. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 48b
Now - one adieu for Albert !- Come away! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 60
Of Albert and Duke Conrad? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 5a
 
ALBERT'S..........2
O proof! proof! proof! Albert's an honest man; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 24
You cannot doubt but 'tis in Albert's power Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 6
 
ALBERTS...........1
For there shall be no "gentle Alberts " now, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 143
 
ALBION............1
Chief Poet! and ye clouds of Albion , On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 9
 
ALCHEMIZ'D........1
Full alchemiz'd , and free of space. Behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 780
 
ALDEBRIM..........1
Was built by Cuthbert de Saint Aldebrim ; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 44
 
ALDER.............1
Of moulted feathers, touchwood, alder chips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 882
 
ALDERS............1
Her naked limbs among the alders green; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 513
 
ALE...............1
Messenger for spicy ale . Robin Hood, Line 32
 
ALECTO'S..........1
Alecto's serpents; ravishments more keen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 875
 
ALERT.............3
Said the good man to Calidore alert ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 123
His destiny, alert he stood: but when Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 334
From your alert eyes and high-lifted brows. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 18
 
ALEXANDER.........3
What care, though striding Alexander past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 24
And Alexander with his night-cap on- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 8
To play the Alexander with Darius. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 34
 
ALFRED............2
Of our own Alfred , of Helvetian Tell; To George Felton Mathew, Line 67
The might of Alfred , and the shaft of Tell; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 70
 
ALFRED'S..........2
Thy name with Alfred's and the great of yore To Kosciusko, Line 11
Great Alfred's too, with anxious, pitying eyes, Sleep and Poetry, Line 385
 
ALIEN.............1
She stood in tears amid the alien corn; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 67
 
ALIENATE..........1
To alienate him from your scheming brain, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 70
 
ALIGHT............1
I became loth and fearful to alight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 583
 
ALIKE.............1
Blinded alike from sunshine and from rain, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 242
 
ALIVE.............13
Against all doubtings, and will keep alive Sleep and Poetry, Line 160
Alive with sparkles - never, I aver, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 442
In backward yawns. But all were soon alive : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 510
Alive , and dazzling cool, and with a sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 609
Shut softly up alive . To speak he tries. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 104
When in an eye thou art, alive with fate! Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 14
Here do they look alive to love and hate, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 38
That did both drown and keep alive my ears. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 277
He is alive ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 69a
And dumb enchantment. Who alive can say The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 11
Being a king, I will not yield alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 24
To whisper, there's the man who took alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 31
The little birds I hear are all alive ; The Jealousies, Line 480
 
ALL'S.............1
On the river - all's still, and the night's sleepy eye Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 10
 
ALLEGIANCE........2
Groan'd for the old allegiance once more, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 162
Groan for the old allegiance once more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 11
 
ALLEY.............4
In noisome alley , and in pathless wood: Addressed to Haydon, Line 4
Of a fresh woodland alley , never ending; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 20
Into the widest alley they all past, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 126
And to old Hum through street and alley hied; The Jealousies, Line 205
 
ALLEYS............3
To alleys where the fir-tree drops its cone, On The Story of Rimini, Line 13
Young mountaineer! descend where alleys bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 203
Through winding alleys ; and lo, wonderment! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 384
 
ALLIED............1
To think that I must be so near allied The Jealousies, Line 166
 
ALLIES............1
His smelling-bottle ready for the allies ; The Jealousies, Line 221
 
ALLIGATORS........2
Web-footed alligators , crocodiles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 245
Poor alligators , poor things of one span, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 62
 
ALLURE............1
Nor to such downy rest can he allure them; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 12
 
ALMANACK..........1
Look in the Almanack - Moore never lies- The Jealousies, Line 500
 
ALMOND............2
Through almond blossoms and rich cinnamon; Sleep and Poetry, Line 118
Sweeping, eye-earnestly, through almond vales: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 380
 
ALMOST............14
Nor listen to accents that, almost adoring, To Some Ladies, Line 3
Almost the highest bliss of human-kind, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 13
'Tis almost death to hear: O let me pour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 982
And almost put a price upon my head? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 53
We should be almost equal. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 60a
Now, when my foot is almost on thy neck, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 197
Almost a dream! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 220a
Almost with pleasure. Let them be set free Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 231
Almost before the recent ink is dry, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 266
Aye, I could almost curse him now myself. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 11
Thy father,- almost mine. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 113a
Was almost murder'd; I am penitent, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 170
That they might see each other while they almost slept; Lamia, Part II, Line 25
Into the noisy world almost forsworn. Lamia, Part II, Line 33
 
ALMSMEN...........1
Even bees, the little almsmen of spring-bowers, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 103
 
ALOE..............1
Like spiked aloe . If an innocent bird Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 698
 
ALOFT.............12
My spear aloft , as signal for the chace- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 532
Lightly this little herald flew aloft , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 64
When a dread waterspout had rear'd aloft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 346
"Within his car, aloft , young Bacchus stood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 209
He heard a laugh full musical aloft ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 198
From hurry to and fro. Soon, up aloft , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 30
Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 2
Of incense, breath'd aloft from sacred hills, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 187
Cried, "Lycius! gentle Lycius!"- Borne aloft Lamia, Part I, Line 168
Each by a sacred tripod held aloft , Lamia, Part II, Line 177
Among the river sallows, borne aloft To Autumn, Line 28
Of incense breath'd aloft from sacred hills, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 31
 
ALONE.............68
Lovely the moon in ether, all alone : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 157
'Tis not content so soon to be alone . On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 14
Good Kosciusko, thy great name alone To Kosciusko, Line 1
But strength alone though of the Muses born Sleep and Poetry, Line 241
From off her brow, and left her all alone . Sleep and Poetry, Line 384
alone , with Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Alone and sad. No, I will once more raise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 477
Immortal, starry; such alone could thus Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 507
Felt too, I was not fearful, nor alone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 645
Singing alone , and fearfully,- how the blood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 727
Alone preserved me from the drear abyss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 904
Alone ? No, no; and by the Orphean lute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 164
Nor in one spot alone ; the floral pride Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 345
Came mother Cybele! alone - alone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 640
Came mother Cybele! alone - alone - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 640
Was quite forgotten, save of us alone ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 786
O I do think that I have been alone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 801
And there she sits most meek and most alone ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 46
And then to die alone . Who can devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 692
Of emerald deep: yet not exalt alone ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 863
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 4
A woman's sigh alone and in distress? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 55
Alone , without a peer: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 271
Far from the earth away - unseen, alone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 350
Alone about the dark - Forgive me, sweet: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 480
And horror! kiss'd his own - he was alone . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 510
Where thou alone shalt come to me, and lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 861
With thee as a dear sister. Thou alone , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 866
Of the wide world I stand alone , and think When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 13
Lay full of darts; for them alone did seethe Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 117
And many times they bit their lips alone , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 170
She weeps alone for pleasures not to be; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 233
She brooded o'er the luxury alone : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 236
Alone : I chant alone the holy mass, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 307
Alone: I chant alone the holy mass, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 307
Alone with her great family Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 11
Where thou didst dream alone on budded bays, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 3
Forgotten is the worldly heart - alone , it beats in vain. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 24
To see what else the moon alone can shew; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 32
You liv'd alone on the forest tree, I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 7
Alone with her good angels, far apart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 142
Heart! thou and I are here sad and alone ; Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 5
The Mule no sooner saw himself alone When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 75
The fallen leaves, when I have sat alone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 54
Alone and palely loitering? La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 2
Alone and palely loitering, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 46
Not to thine ear alone I make confession, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 173
Though I alone were taken in these toils, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 61
You live alone in my security: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
And, thoughtless! suffer'd thee to pass alone Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
What I alone will execute! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 151a
Nor even Apollo when he sang alone , Lamia, Part I, Line 74
Thou shalt behold her, Hermes, thou alone , Lamia, Part I, Line 110
And will you leave me on the hills alone ? Lamia, Part I, Line 245
"Leave thee alone ! Look back! Ah, Goddess, see Lamia, Part I, Line 257
Alone they can drink up the morning rain: Lamia, Part I, Line 264
As those who, safe together met alone Lamia, Part I, Line 302
But wept alone those days, for why should she adore? Lamia, Part I, Line 321
Companion'd or alone ; while many a light Lamia, Part I, Line 357
Some time to any, but those two alone , Lamia, Part I, Line 389
Had not a friend. So being left alone , Lamia, Part II, Line 111
For Poesy alone can tell her dreams, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 8
With the fine spell of words alone can save The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 9
Other men here: but I am here alone ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 160
The pain alone ; the joy alone; distinct: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 174
The pain alone; the joy alone ; distinct: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 174
Love, love alone , has pains severe and many; To Fanny, Line 46
For on that eve alone can you the maid convey." The Jealousies, Line 504
 
ALONG.............47
And oar'd himself along with majesty; Imitation of Spenser, Line 15
Float along the pleased air, Ode to Apollo, Line 37
And soon upon the lake he skims along , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 60
Anon he leaps along the oaken floors Calidore: A Fragment, Line 71
Though feathery clouds were floating all along To My Brother George (epistle), Line 10
And float along like birds o'er summer seas; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 57
Along a huge cloud's ridge; and now with sprightly Sleep and Poetry, Line 130
Passing along before a dusky space Sleep and Poetry, Line 139
And, like a muddy stream, would bear along Sleep and Poetry, Line 158
Along the reedy stream; a half heard strain, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 161
Leading the way, young damsels danced along , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 135
Along a path between two little streams,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 415
But lapp'd and lull'd along the dangerous sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 646
Tracing along , it brought me to a cave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 935
Along the pebbled shore of memory! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 17
So once more days and nights aid me along , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 42
Himself along the grass. What gentle tongue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 96
Along whose track the prince quick footsteps told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 227
Along the ground they took a winding course. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 926
And pour to death along some hungry sands."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1004
Along his fated way. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 119a
My skiff along green shelving coasts, to hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 358
The Latmian persever'd along , and thus Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 789
Gulphs in the morning light, and scuds along Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 956
O young Apollo, let me fly along with thee; Apollo to the Graces, Line 8
Thou bearest me along God of the meridian, Line 18
Along the flat brown sand. I was at home, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 92
And as he to the court-yard pass'd along , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 193
See, as they creep along the river side, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 345
Along the chapel aisle by slow degrees: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 13
She danc'd along with vague, regardless eyes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 64
Shuffling along with ivory-headed wand, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 92
And the long carpets rose along the gusty floor. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 360
Hurry along to some less magic shade. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 8
Along the margin-sand large foot-marks went, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 15
And all along a dismal rack of clouds, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 302
Have ye beheld his chariot, foam'd along Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 234
That, lingering along a pebbled coast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 301
I have news precious as we pass along . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 148
Orbing along the serene firmament Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 79
Howling in vain along the hollow night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 49
Veil'd, in a chariot, heralded along Lamia, Part II, Line 108
Along the mirror'd walls by twin-clouds odorous. Lamia, Part II, Line 182
Soft went the music the soft air along , Lamia, Part II, Line 199
Along the margin sand large footmarks went The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 319
Winging along where the great water throes? What can I do to drive away, Line 17
Along the forest side! Now amber lines The Jealousies, Line 557
 
ALOOF.............14
And keep that fiend Despondence far aloof . To Hope, Line 12
In leafy quiet: where to pry, aloof , To George Felton Mathew, Line 47
Keep Sleep aloof : but more than that there came Sleep and Poetry, Line 397
Of those dusk places in times far aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 625
Aw'd from the throne aloof ;- and when storm-rent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 871
He felt aloof the day and morning's prime- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 374
In such wise, in such temper, so aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 490
With love, and kept all phantom fear aloof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 290
Standing aloof in giant ignorance, To Homer, Line 1
Arched every way aloof ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 18
The Emperor's pardon, Ludolph kept aloof , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 101
Kept danger all aloof from Otho's head, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 22
Keep fearful and aloof from his last gaze, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13
And holds our bladed falchions all aloof . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 37
 
ALOUD.............7
Of shepherds, lifting in due time aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 162
Before the fierce witch, speaking thus aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 538
To his inward senses these words spake aloud ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1020
Has wept for thee, calling to Jove aloud . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 607
Why were they proud? again we ask aloud , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 127
And every night in dreams they groan'd aloud , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 263
Speak aloud ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 164b
 
ALP...............2
To sit upon an Alp as on a throne, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 7
Of newest joys upon that alp . Sometimes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 666
 
ALPHEUS...........3
Kindest Alpheus , for should I obey Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 959
Alpheus ! thou enchanter! every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 965
"What can I do, Alpheus ? Dian stands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1005
 
ALPS..............1
What are the cities 'yond the Alps to me, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 18
 
ALREADY...........6
The sweet-lipp'd ladies have already greeted Calidore: A Fragment, Line 135
Already , a more healthy countenance? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 987
Had done't already ; that the dreadful smiles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 782
But no - already had his deathbell rung; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 22
Already with thee! tender is the night, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 35
Not done already a sheer judgment on thee? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 95
 
ALS...............1
-" Als writith he of swevenis The Eve of St. Mark, Line 99
 
ALSO..............6
It came. Also imaginings will hover Sleep and Poetry, Line 71
Fright and perplex, so also shuddered he- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 170
Also , when he would taste the spicy wreaths Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 186
Some started on their feet; some also shouted; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 111
Still shone her crown; that vanish'd, also she Lamia, Part I, Line 165
Fright and perplex, so also shudders he: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 19
 
ALTAR.............12
Of April meadows? Here her altar shone, Sleep and Poetry, Line 171
Who gathering round the altar , seemed to pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 111
Making directly for the woodland altar . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 127
Thy mossy footstool shall the altar be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 711
Nor altar heap'd with flowers; Ode to Psyche, Line 29
To what green altar , O mysterious priest, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 32
Upon the altar of wrath! She stings me through!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 157
At level of whose feet an altar slept, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 89
Towards the altar sober-pac'd I went, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 93
And clouded all the altar with soft smoke, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 105
Whose altar this; for whom this incense curls: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 212
I look'd upon the altar and its horns The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 237
 
ALTAR'S...........1
There was a silence while the altar's blaze The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 232
 
ALTER.............2
There stood a marble alter , with a tress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 90
Can alter my resolve. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 130a
 
ALTER'D...........1
Alter'd her mind, and thought it very nice: The Jealousies, Line 653
 
ALTERATION........1
One moon, with alteration slow, had shed Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 83
 
ALTERNATE.........1
Thus in alternate uproar and sad peace, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 1
 
ALTHOUGH..........10
That never tongue, although it overteem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 575
That needs must die, although its little beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 676
Although , before the crystal heavens darken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 739
Just so may love, although 'tis understood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 832
Although the sun of poesy is set, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 729
Aye, his lull'd soul was there, although upborne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 549
Adieu, my daintiest Dream! although so vast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 656
Would hide us up, although spring leaves were none; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 672
New to the feet, although the tale a hundred times be told: There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 6
Although her story sounds at first a little queer." The Jealousies, Line 405
 
ALWAY.............3
They alway must be with us, or we die. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 33
Begirt with ministring looks: alway his eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 150
Shaded hyacinth, alway Fancy, Line 51
 
ALWAYS............12
'Mong which the nightingales have always sung To George Felton Mathew, Line 46
And always does my heart with pleasure dance, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 51
As if he always listened to the sighs Sleep and Poetry, Line 386
As much as here is penn'd doth always find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 847
And always , at the rising of the sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 254
"Alas!" said he, "were I but always borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 615
That thou mayst always know whither I roam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 687
My shoemaker was always Mr. Bates. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 18
Auranthe - heaven preserve her always fair!- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 148
"He always comes down backward, with one shoe"- The Jealousies, Line 304
He's always in my way upon the mat!" The Jealousies, Line 312
The monster's always after something new," The Jealousies, Line 545


Published @ RC

March 2005