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Keats Concordance
 
AMAIN.............4
Yet, in our very souls, we feel amain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 12
Where Porphyro took covert, pleas'd amain . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 188
Arriving at the portal, gaz'd amain , Lamia, Part II, Line 151
Therefore he call'd a coach, and bade it drive amain . The Jealousies, Line 225
 
AMALTHEA..........1
Sweeter than that nurse Amalthea skimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 448
 
AMARANTH..........1
Unfaded amaranth , when wild it strays Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 783
 
AMATE.............1
A half-blown flower, which cold blasts amate . Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 8
 
AMAZ'D............4
With hands held back, and motionless, amaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 232
To some wight, amaz'd to hear Robin Hood, Line 17
Amaz'd and full of fear; like anxious men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 198
Amaz'd , and full of fear; like anxious men The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 42
 
AMAZE.............16
After the Argonauts, in blind amaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 347
Who brooded o'er the water in amaze : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 132
Of blank amazements that amaze no more? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 903
This palace floor breath-air,- but for the amaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 884
To Endymion's amaze : "By Cupid's dove, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 979
Amaze , amaze! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 41
Amaze, amaze ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 41
To venture so: it fills me with amaze The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 122
Amaze ! Amaze! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 94b
Amaze! Amaze ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 94b
Amaze ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 165b
Lycius from death awoke into amaze , Lamia, Part I, Line 322
Then from amaze into delight he fell Lamia, Part I, Line 324
Lost in a soft amaze , To Fanny, Line 15
It would amaze your Highness now to mark King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 36
With mad-cap pleasure, or hand-clasp'd amaze : The Jealousies, Line 724
 
AMAZED............2
Had time to keep him in amazed ken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 216
Amazed were those Titans utterly. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 2
 
AMAZEMENT.........3
Such tales as needs must with amazement spell you. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 66
Came the amazement , that, absorb'd in it, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 248
Do not affect amazement , hypocrite, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 160
 
AMAZEMENTS........1
Of blank amazements that amaze no more? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 903
 
AMAZEST...........1
Hungarian! Thou amazest me beyond Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
 
AMAZON............2
And tall as Amazon : Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 26
By her in stature the tall Amazon Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 27
 
AMBASSADOR........1
To cry himself up an ambassador Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 109
 
AMBASSADOR'S......1
Th' Ambassador's return'd from Pigmio! The Jealousies, Line 551
 
AMBER.............10
Crowning its lawny crest with amber flame, Imitation of Spenser, Line 3
Through the dark robe oft amber rays prevail, To Lord Byron, Line 11
To show their purple stars, and bells of amber . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 137
Its delicate amber ; and the dairy pails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 44
And paces leisurely down amber plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 551
Islands, and creeks, and amber -fretted strands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 743
That time thou didst adorn, with amber studs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 924
Of amber 'gainst their faces levelling. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 838
Its bottom will I strew with amber shells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 695
Along the forest side! Now amber lines The Jealousies, Line 557
 
AMBIGUOUS.........1
Its most ambiguous atoms with sure art; Lamia, Part I, Line 196
 
AMBITION..........8
Could I, at once, my mad ambition smother, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 110
the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Ambition is no sluggard: 'tis no prize, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 523
Ambition from their memories, and brim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 845
The second was Ambition , pale of cheek, Ode on Indolence, Line 26
And for that poor Ambition - it springs Ode on Indolence, Line 33
Losing its gust, and my ambition blind. I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 14
The ambition is a noble one. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 33a
 
AMBITION'S........1
Fresh hatch'd in my ambition's eagle-nest; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 41
 
AMBITIOUS.........6
The large-eyed wonder, and ambitious heat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 127
Upon my ambitious head a glorious gain- On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 6
Ambitious for the hallowing of thine eyes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 60
Of ambitious magic: every ocean-form Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 199
Is in the heady, proud, ambitious vein; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 149
You, an ambitious soldier! I, a queen, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 151
 
AMBROSIA..........1
She did so breathe ambrosia ; so immerse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 454
 
AMBROSIAL.........1
Of heaven ambrosial ; and we will shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 810
 
AMEN..............1
Or wait the Amen ere thy poppy throws Sonnet to Sleep, Line 7
 
AMENITY...........1
With brighter eyes and slow amenity , Lamia, Part I, Line 293
 
AMETHYST..........4
And towers of amethyst ,- would I so tease Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 745
Diversely ting'd with rose and amethyst , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 386
And on her silver cross soft amethyst , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 221
Of all her sapphires, greens, and amethyst , Lamia, Part I, Line 162
 
AMID..............27
Amid the gloom of grief and tears. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 24
Amid the pages, and the torches' glare, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 109
Fondles the flower amid the sobbing rain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 331
Of careless butterflies: amid his pains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 765
Amid her window-flowers,- sighing,- weaning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 28
And purblind amid foggy, midnight wolds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 636
Amid the thrush's song. Away! Avaunt! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 974
Amid the fierce intoxicating tones Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 16
Amid his toil thou gav'st Leander breath; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 97
I heard their cries amid loud thunder-rolls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 660
Long didst thou sit amid our regions wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 8
And hear a merry laugh amid the thunder; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 6
An hour glass on the turn, amid the trails Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 44
Amid the timbrels, and the throng'd resort The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 67
Exalt amid the tapers' shine The Eve of St. Mark, Line 118
Amid the woods they were, so lone and wild, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 5
Stood bright, amid the sorrow of his peers? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 30
She stood in tears amid the alien corn; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 67
Amid the wreck of thousands I am whole; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 2
Still weep amid the wild Hungarian camp, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 196
Amid a camp, whose steeled swarms I dar'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 67
Suck'd to my grave amid a dreary calm! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 27
Amid the hoarse alarm of Corinth's voice. Lamia, Part II, Line 61
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store? To Autumn, Line 12
Trembled amid the white curls of his beard. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 451
Keeps elbow room amid our eager swords, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 36
Rested amid the desert's dreariment, The Jealousies, Line 394
 
AMISS.............1
Tell me thine ailment: tell me all amiss !- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 519
 
AMITY.............2
Which, as it were in gentle amity , Imitation of Spenser, Line 30
This ring as pledge of dearest amity ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 136
 
AMONG.............78
But this is past. Thou art among the stars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 9
Let it not be among the jumbled heap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 2
In dark green ivy, and among wild larches? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 34
And peers among the cloudlet's jet and white, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 94
When at night-fall among your books we got: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 118
Among the bushes half leafless, and dry; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 2
In breezy rest among the nodding stalks. Sleep and Poetry, Line 135
Of a swan's neck unseen among the rushes: Sleep and Poetry, Line 341
A little noiseless noise among the leaves, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 11
And cool themselves among the em'rald tresses; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 82
The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 14
Among the shepherds, 'twas believed ever, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 73
Among the throng. His youth was fully blown, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 169
Among his brothers of the mountain chase. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 192
His quick gone love, among fair blossom'd boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 375
Among sere leaves and twigs, might all be heard. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 452
Her naked limbs among the alders green; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 513
Among the stars in virgin splendour pours; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 580
Among the winds at large - that all may hearken! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 738
And cloister'd among cool and bunched leaves- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 829
And, plashing among bedded pebbles, stuck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 932
And breathe them sighingly among the boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 952
O let me cool it the zephyr-boughs among ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 318
One moment with his hand among the sweets: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 354
Or keeping watch among those starry seven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 689
Among the conchs and shells of the lofty grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 921
Her voice I hung like fruit among green leaves: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 271
Ere from among some rocks of glittering spar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 819
That thou mayst listen the cold dews among ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 163
Among cool clouds and winds, but that the free, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 351
So timidly among the stars: come hither! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 603
Among the abodes of mortals here below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 628
Us live in peace, in love and peace among Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 635
Warm as a dove's nest among summer trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 666
Among the breakers.- 'Twas a quiet eve; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 89
Of death among the bushes and the leaves, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 253
Like hoarse night-gusts sepulchral briars among . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 288
Among the dead: She withers, like a palm Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 447
Among her kindred, wonder'd that such dower Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 454
She met among the bushes. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 24
O smile among the shades, for this is fame! This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 14
Another way he went, and soon among The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 25
Or may I never leave my grave among the dead." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 180
For aye unsought for slept among his ashes cold. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 378
Among its golden broideries; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 28
For as among us mortals omens drear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 169
There is sad feud among ye, and rebellion Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 321
Sobb'd Clymene among her tangled hair. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 76
First onwards in, among the fallen tribe. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 100
Felt faint, and would have sunk among the rest, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 106
Among immortals when a God gives sign, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 118
Among these fallen, Saturn's voice therefrom Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 125
Thus wording timidly among the fierce: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 251
And this thing woe crept in among our hearts, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 254
Among the brotherhood; and, at their glare, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 383
Fluttering among the faint Olympians, Ode to Psyche, Line 42
What thou among the leaves hast never known, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 22
And be among her cloudy trophies hung. Ode on Melancholy, Line 30
Among the midnight rumours from the camp. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
Among his fallen captains on yon plains. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 92
Bloody Taraxa, is among the dead. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 136
I would you had appear'd among those lords, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 61
Among the new-plum'd minions of the war. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 111
I found it in the tent, among some spoils Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 66
For slaves among these Huns. Away! Away! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 77
Sits in the banquet-room among his chiefs; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 62
Among the gods!- and silence is as natural. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 30
Among the Gods, upon Olympus old, Lamia, Part I, Line 71
Light flew his earnest words, among the blossoms blown. Lamia, Part I, Line 91
And once, while among mortals dreaming thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 215
There is not such a treat among them all, Lamia, Part I, Line 330
Kept up among the guests, discoursing low Lamia, Part II, Line 201
Among the river sallows, borne aloft To Autumn, Line 28
Among the fragrant husks and berries crush'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 52
In Council, dreams too much among his books. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 32
Among the fresh arrivals in our empery. The Jealousies, Line 189
Created an alarm among our troop, The Jealousies, Line 668
From square to square, among the buildings raved, The Jealousies, Line 736
 
AMONGST...........3
A spoil amongst them. I prepar'd to flee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 564
Amongst them? Feelest not a kindred pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 62
her, to whose wedding, amongst other guests, came Apollonius; who, by some Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
AMOROUS...........18
Thou wilt think that some amorous zephyr is nigh; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 14
First touch'd; what amorous , and fondling nips I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 144
He's gone - up bubbles all his amorous breath. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 14
He was content to let her amorous plea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 462
In amorous rillets down her shrinking form! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 945
The curly foam with amorous influence. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 85
And fought in an amorous nipping. O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 12
And of thy roses amorous of the moon, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 148
Out of the amorous dark what day doth borrow. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 206
Came many a tiptoe, amorous cavalier, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 60
Or Vesper, amorous glow-worm of the sky; Ode to Psyche, Line 27
With pleasant weight, the amorous -aching earth, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
His golden throne, bent warm on amorous theft: Lamia, Part I, Line 8
Break amorous through the clouds, as morning breaks, Lamia, Part I, Line 77
The amorous promise of her lone complain, Lamia, Part I, Line 288
Of amorous herbs and flowers, newly reap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 318
Let, let the amorous burn- To Fanny, Line 20
Sparkling revenge with amorous fury blent. The Jealousies, Line 175
 
AMOROUSLY.........1
Asking for her lost basil amorously ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 490
 
AMORT.............1
Hoodwink'd with faery fancy; all amort , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 70
 
AMPHION...........1
Theban Amphion leaning on his lute: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1002
 
AMPHION'S.........2
Have mov'd, even though Amphion's harp had woo'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 461
Amphion's utterance, toned with his lyre, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 24
 
AMPHITRITE........2
To Amphitrite ; all my clear-eyed fish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 109
To gaze on Amphitrite , queen of pearls, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1004
 
AMPLE.............12
And behind each ample curl Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 17
Wraps round her ample robe with happy trembling. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 18
Rein in the swelling of his ample might? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 48
Were I of ample strength for such a freak. To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 8
And, ample as the largest winding-sheet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 196
Their ample feathers, are in slumber dead,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 402
Instead of sweets, his ample palate took Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 188
The rustle of those ample skirts about Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 56
My Emperor, is ample recompense Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 180
An ample store of misery thou hast, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 173
Breath'd from the hinges, as the ample span Lamia, Part I, Line 387
Instead of sweets, his ample palate takes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 32
 
AMPLER............1
Her long black hair swell'd ampler , in display Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 984
 
AMULET............1
O for some drowsy Morphean amulet ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 257
 
AN'...............5
An' mossie fountains? Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 4
An' mony ithers. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 32
Young Tam came up an' eyed me quick Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 33
An' every heart is full on flame Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 39
An' light as feather. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 40
 
AN'T..............1
"I fetch her!"- "Yes, an't like your Majesty; The Jealousies, Line 487
 
ANACREON..........1
A glorious folio of Anacreon ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 41
 
ANATOMY...........2
And shew his little eye's anatomy . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 209
this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece." Burton's " Anatomy of Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
ANCESTRAL.........1
Enriched from ancestral merchandize, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 106
 
ANCHOR............4
Moves round the point, and throws her anchor stiff. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 24
Man feels the gentle anchor pull and gladdens in its strength. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 40
Yet be the anchor e'er so fast, room is there for a prayer There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 45
Even as Hope upon her anchor leans, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 61
 
ANCHOR'D..........1
Fresh anchor'd ; whither he had been awhile Lamia, Part I, Line 226
 
ANCHORS...........1
Old rusted anchors , helmets, breast-plates large Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 123
 
ANCIENT...........9
Of ancient Nox;- then skeletons of man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 133
With death, as life. The ancient harps have said, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 396
A promenade for cooks and ancient ladies; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 13
That ancient Beadsman heard the prelude soft; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 28
He play'd an ancient ditty, long since mute, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 291
Each in its ancient belfry nest, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 64
His ancient mother, for some comfort yet. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 21
Show thy heart's secret to an ancient Power Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 76
In ancient days by emperor and clown: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 64
 
ANCLES............2
How tremblingly their delicate ancles spann'd! Calidore: A Fragment, Line 82
For curled Jewesses with ancles neat, Character of C.B., Line 26
 
ANDROMEDA.........2
Andromeda ! sweet woman! why delaying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 602
And, like Andromeda , the sonnet sweet If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 2
 
ANE...............1
Ane minute's guessing- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 6
 
ANEW..............8
From his lush clover covert; - when anew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 3
I'll feel my heaven anew , Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 17
Of ocean fades upon him; then, anew , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 76
Before his footsteps; as when heav'd anew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 347
Grew up like organ, that begins anew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 126
Pout her faint lips anew with rubious health; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
To get anew What can I do to drive away, Line 19
Escapes, makes fiercer onset, the anew King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 13
 
ANGEL.............7
Or hand of hymning angel , when 'tis seen On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 4
Is like a fallen angel : trees uptorn, Sleep and Poetry, Line 242
Grief born of thee, young angel ! fairest thief! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 108
Let me not think, soft Angel ! shall it be so? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 304
She seem'd a splendid angel , newly drest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 223
Here sitting like an angel newly-shent, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
By angel tasted, or our mother Eve; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 31
 
ANGEL'S...........3
E'en like the passage of an angel's tear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 13
What angel's voice is that? Erminia! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 168
Philosophy will clip an Angel's wings, Lamia, Part II, Line 234
 
ANGELA............5
"O tell me, Angela , by the holy loom The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 115
Good Angela , believe me by these tears; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 150
That Angela gives promise she will do The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 161
Old Angela was feeling for the stair, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 191
Were long be-nightmar'd. Angela the old The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 375
 
ANGELS............4
The carved angels , ever eager-eyed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 34
This very night: good angels her deceive! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 125
Alone with her good angels , far apart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 142
As once fair angels on a ladder flew The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 135
 
ANGELS'...........1
The stars of heaven, and angels' wings, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 30
 
ANGER.............7
Anger our huntsmen: Breather round our farms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 283
Of whisperers in anger , or in sport; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 68
And anger their live tapestries; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 20
Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows, Ode on Melancholy, Line 18
Unto thine anger I might well have spoken, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 28
Why do I anger him when I should kneel? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 75
Of anger in her eyes, enough to breed The Jealousies, Line 67
 
ANGER'D...........1
Has anger'd me. The noble Earl, methinks, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 30
 
ANGERLY...........2
Flush'd angerly : while sometimes eagle's wings, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 182
Flush angerly : when he would taste the wreaths The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 30
 
ANGLE.............2
Her wits to 'scape away to Angle -land; The Jealousies, Line 114
Adieu! adieu! I'm off for Angle -land! The Jealousies, Line 599
 
ANGLED............1
And the warm angled winter screen, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 77
 
ANGORA............1
And silken furr'd Angora cat. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 82
 
ANGRY.............5
By angry wolf, or pard with prying head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 76
It seems an angry lightning, and doth hiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 233
Of angry powers: there are deities Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 980
Glaring the angry witch. O Dis, even now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 567
Sullen against the wind! If in two angry brows Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 58
 
ANGUISH...........8
And cruelly left him to sorrow, and anguish . On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 28
Therefore no lover did of anguish die: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 236
There anguish does not sting; nor pleasure pall: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 526
With anguish moist and fever dew, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 10
And drown the wakeful anguish of the soul. Ode on Melancholy, Line 10
No!- brief be his anguish ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 191
Her eyes in torture fix'd, and anguish drear, Lamia, Part I, Line 150
I shriek'd; and the sharp anguish of my shriek The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 126
 
ANGUISH'D.........3
A table, and, half anguish'd , threw thereon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 255
Die into life: so young Apollo anguish'd : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 130
For the first time through many anguish'd days, Lamia, Part I, Line 303
 
ANGUISHED.........1
So once more he had wak'd and anguished Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 49
 
ANGULAR...........1
With all its lines abrupt and angular : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 228
 
ANIMAL............1
Now the dull animal forsooth must be Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 19
 
ANIMATE...........1
All which elsewhere are but half animate , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 37
 
ANIMATED..........1
All were re- animated . There arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 790
 
ANKLE.............2
Of thine ankle lightly turn'd: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 25
Full ankle -deep in lilies of the vale. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 35
 
ANKLES............2
Dost thou now lave thy feet and ankles white? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 325
Of knee from knee, nor ankles pointing light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 401
 
ANNIHILATE........1
So time itself would be annihilate ; To J.R., Line 6
 
ANNIVERSARY.......1
the Anniversary of Charles's Restoration, on Hearing the Bells Lines Written on 29 May, Extended Title
 
ANNOY.............1
O, for an age so shelter'd from annoy , Ode on Indolence, Line 38
 
ANNOY'D...........1
Where liv'd the youth, who worried and annoy'd The Jealousies, Line 115
 
ANNULL'D..........1
Annull'd my vigorous cravings: and thus quell'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 662
 
ANNULS............1
Annuls all feel of kindred. What is son,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 63
 
ANON..............28
'Gainst the smooth surface, and to mark anon , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 17
Whence ever and anon the jay outsprings, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 36
Anon he leaps along the oaken floors Calidore: A Fragment, Line 71
Gush ever and anon with silent creep, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 100
Come from the Galaxy: anon he sports,- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 5
Anon he stain'd the thick and spongy sod Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 225
While ever and anon to his shorn peers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 280
Anon they wander'd, by divine converse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 371
Gurgling in beds of coral: for anon , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 640
Be rather in the trumpet's mouth,- anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 737
Are gone in tender madness, and anon , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 949
Fancy into belief: anon it leads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 234
And, ever and anon , uprose to look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 422
Look full upon it feel anon the blue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 543
Anon the strange voice is upon the wane- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 849
Anon upon that giant's arm I'll be, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 243
It ceased - I caught light footsteps; and anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 423
Anon she took a branch of mistletoe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 514
Anon his heart revives: her vespers done, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 226
But ever and anon the glancing spheres, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 273
Leave them, O Muse! for thou anon wilt find Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 7
You shall know all anon . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 42a
He will be calm anon . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 49b
Be ready to obey me; anon thou shalt Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 128
Came jasper pannels; then, anon , there burst Lamia, Part II, Line 139
Anon rush'd by the bright Hyperion; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 57
Smiling. Anon upon him rush'd once more King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 48
Anon , I'll tell what course were best to take; The Jealousies, Line 493
 
ANOTHER...........41
These, these will give the world another heart, Addressed to the Same, Line 11
Another , bending o'er her nimble tread, Sleep and Poetry, Line 113
Another will entice me on, and on Sleep and Poetry, Line 117
See, in another picture, nymphs are wiping Sleep and Poetry, Line 372
Of winter hoar. Then came another crowd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 161
Another wish'd, mid that eternal spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 378
Another city doth he set about, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 148
And onward to another city speeds. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 152
At the youth's slumber; while another took Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 423
And shook it on his hair; another flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 425
In another gloomy arch. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 649a
My sullen steps; another 'fore my eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 605
Another multitude. Whereat more quick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 821
Who has another care when thou hast smil'd? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 979
Thirst for another love: O impious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 87
And by another , in deep dell below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 679
"O may I never see another night, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 29
Another night, and not my passion shrive. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 64
Another cannot wake thy giant size! To Ailsa Rock, Line 14
Another domestic of Ben's. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Keats's Note to Line 53
And one another , in soft ease Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 10
Another way he went, and soon among The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 25
Another world, another universe, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 143
Another world, another universe, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 143
Where is another Chaos? Where?"- That word Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 145
Iapetus another ; in his grasp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 44
Yea, by that law, another race may drive Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 230
And then another , then another strain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 285
And then another, then another strain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 285
The flower will bloom another year. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 2
The flower will bloom another year. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 16
I have another steadfast one, to uphold Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 162
Why has he time to breathe another word? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 106
In one room music, in another sadness, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 278
Another part of the Forest. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Setting
Done to another ,- Conrad has it home! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 6
Into another , she began to sing, Lamia, Part I, Line 297
Scarce saw in all the room another face, Lamia, Part II, Line 240
What am I that another death come not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 139
Another part of the Field. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Setting
Another sword! and what if I could seize King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 1
 
ANSWER............8
To answer ; feeling well that breathed words Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 712
The Graces all answer Apollo to the Graces, S.D. to Line 7
Give answer by thy voice, the sea fowls' screams! To Ailsa Rock, Line 2
We met could answer any certainty. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 275
Thy life answer the truth! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 127a
To any one, answer , collectedly, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 17
I had no words to answer ; for my tongue, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 228
Inclined to answer ; wherefore instantly The Jealousies, Line 782
 
ANSWER'D..........11
But so it was, none answer'd for a space, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 247
And yet she answer'd not, only complain'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 249
Thus answer'd , while his white melodious throat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 81
Heard his loud laugh, and answer'd in full choir. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 51
He answer'd , bending to her open eyes, Lamia, Part II, Line 46
Know'st thou that man?" Poor Lamia answer'd not. Lamia, Part II, Line 255
From Lycius answer'd , as heart-struck and lost, Lamia, Part II, Line 293
So answer'd I, continuing, "If it please, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 186
Where, till the porter answer'd , might be seen, The Jealousies, Line 276
"Commander of the faithful!" answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 361
"You seem to know"- "I do know," answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 379
 
ANSWER'ST.........1
Thou answer'st not, for thou art dead asleep; To Ailsa Rock, Line 9
 
ANSWERED..........1
Hyperion from the peak loud answered , "Saturn!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 388
 
ANSWERING.........1
Answering thus, just as the golden morrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 726
 
ANTAGONIZING......1
Antagonizing Boreas,- and so vanish'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 531
 
ANTELOPE..........1
Up which he had not fear'd the antelope ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 792
 
ANTHEM............2
Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 81
Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Ode to a Nightingale, Line 75
 
ANTHEMING.........2
Sweet birds antheming the morn: Fancy, Line 42
Thy lips, and antheming a lonely grief. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 6
 
ANTHEMS...........1
As o'er Sicilian seas, clear anthems float To George Felton Mathew, Line 14
 
ANTHONY...........1
And Anthony resides in Brunswick Square. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 10
 
ANTHROPOPHAGI.....1
Anthropophagi in Othello's mood, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 10
 
ANTICHAMBER.......3
An Antichamber in the Castle. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Setting
When in an antichamber every guest Lamia, Part II, Line 191
Onward from the antichamber of this dream, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 465
 
ANTICIPATED.......1
Each one his own anticipated bliss. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 373
 
ANTIENT...........2
His antient mother, for some comfort yet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 326
Spin round, the stars their antient courses keep, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 419
 
ANTIPODES.........1
Diverse, sheer opposite, antipodes . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 200
 
ANTIQUE...........4
"The stretched metre of an antique song" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Epigraph
Or hath that antique mien and robed form Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 51
O brightest! though too late for antique vows, Ode to Psyche, Line 36
Like a Silenus on an antique vase. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 56
 
ANTIQUITY.........1
Sidelong its rich antiquity , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 42
 
ANTIROOM..........2
Here in the antiroom ;- that may be a trifle. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 6
In this most honourable antiroom , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 11
 
ANTLER'D..........1
Of squirrels, foxes shy, and antler'd deer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 469
 
ANTRE.............1
Through a vast antre ; then the metal woof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 230
 
ANXIETY...........3
The disappointment, the anxiety , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 154
Of rage, of fear, anxiety , revenge, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 94
Is beating with a child's anxiety , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 23
 
ANXIOUS...........18
Great Alfred's too, with anxious , pitying eyes, Sleep and Poetry, Line 385
The anxious month, relieving from its pains, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 5
Or anxious calls, or close of trembling palms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 401
So anxious for the end, he scarcely wastes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 353
Stand anxious : see! behold!" - This clamant word Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 494
Long time in silence did their anxious fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 733
Than Hermes' pipe, when anxious he did lean Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 876
He kept an anxious ear. The humming tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 916
Anxious as hind towards her hidden fawn. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 43
In anxious secrecy they took it home, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 401
Anxious her lips, her breathing quick and short: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 65
Amaz'd and full of fear; like anxious men Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 198
And, like an anxious warder, strain his sight Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 17
What made you then, with such an anxious love, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 32
The Emperor's anxious wishes- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 129a
Watch'd her, as anxious husbandmen the grain, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 133
Amaz'd, and full of fear; like anxious men The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 42
"'Stead of his anxious Majesty and court The Jealousies, Line 757
 
ANXIOUSLY.........2
And anxiously began to plait and twist Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 102
When anxiously Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 116c
 
ANY...............74
Wherefore does any grief our joy impair? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 14
With honors; nor had any other care Sleep and Poetry, Line 179
As any thing most true; as that the year Sleep and Poetry, Line 294
That any Daniel, though he be a sot, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 12
Any , any where. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 4
Any, any where. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 4
they if I thought a year's castigation would do them any good;- it will not: the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
That, any longer, I will pass my days Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 476
If any said 'twas love: and yet 'twas love; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 730
A wonder, fair as any I have told- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 894
Of any spirit to tell, but one of those Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 250
By any touch, a bunch of blooming plums Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 450
And thus: "I need not any hearing tire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 457
Us young immortals, without any let, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 487
My soul of any rest: yet must I hence: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 776
Made fiercer by a fear lest any part Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 845
Nor mark'd with any sign or charactery- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 762
Nor any drooping flower Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 170
Or height, or depth, or width, or any chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 357
But were there ever any In drear nighted December, Line 19
I cannot look on any budding flower, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 9
So without any fuss, any hawing and humming, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 11
So without any fuss, any hawing and humming, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 11
Cannot refer to any standard law Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 81
If thou didst ever any thing believe, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 59
Unknown of any , free from whispering tale. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 86
Where, without any word, from stabs he fell. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 296
And seldom felt she any hunger-pain; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 468
To any living thing, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 2
Has any here an old grey mare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 9
Has any here a lawyer suit All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 13
Has any here a daughter fair All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 37
Has any here a pious spouse All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 45
Or dance, or play, do any thing, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 86
Which any man may number for his sport, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 18
Or any other wondrous thing Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 6
Him any mercy, in that mansion foul, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 89
And off he went, run, trot, or any how. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 96
Deserted, void, nor any haunt of mine. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 240
Though feminine, than any of her sons: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 55
To any one particular beauteous star, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 100
I would not Albert suffer any wrong. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 110
And, to say truth, in any Christian arm Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
For what can any man on earth do more? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 182
I leave it all to fate - to any thing! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 2
Good gods! not else, in any way, my liege! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 111
Aye, any thing to me, fair creature. Do, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 38
If you have any pity for a maid, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 44
Any compassion for that Emperor's niece, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 46
If I have any knowledge of you, sir, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 112
Of any proof against the honourableness Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 213
Than any drummer's in the muster-roll; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 268
We met could answer any certainty. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 275
Stood in the passage whispering; if any Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 3
By any hindrance, but with gentlest force Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
Any diviner eloquence,- woo her ears Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
To any one, answer, collectedly, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 17
Were strewn rich gifts, unknown to any Muse, Lamia, Part I, Line 19
The cruel lady, without any show Lamia, Part I, Line 290
Any more subtle fluid in her veins Lamia, Part I, Line 307
Some time to any , but those two alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 389
As still I do. Hast any mortal name, Lamia, Part II, Line 88
With any pleasure on me, do not bid Lamia, Part II, Line 100
As her weak hand could any meaning tell, Lamia, Part II, Line 302
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Unown'd of any weedy-haired gods; What can I do to drive away, Line 36
To any but the second man of the realm, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 25
Who 'sdains to yield to any but his peer, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 43
Like any drone shut from the fair bee-queen, The Jealousies, Line 132
That fellow's voice, which plagues me worse than any , The Jealousies, Line 159
Any foul play, or awkward murdering, The Jealousies, Line 192
On any terms, marry Miss Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 461
"Besides, manners forbid that I should pass any The Jealousies, Line 469
Who should indulge his genius, if he has any , The Jealousies, Line 471
 
APACE.............2
By a bright something, sailing down apace , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 602
Said gentle Hum; "the nights draw in apace ; The Jealousies, Line 479
 
APART.............8
And other spirits there are standing apart Addressed to the Same, Line 9
As if the ministring stars kept not apart , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 50
Endymion from Glaucus stood apart , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 773
Twin roses by the zephyr blown apart Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 74
Alone with her good angels, far apart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 142
Clench'd her small teeth, and held her lips apart , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 43
And watching, with eternal lids apart , Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 3
[They talk apart . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 14b
 
APARTMENT.........5
An Apartment in the Castle. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Setting
An Apartment in the Castle. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Setting
AURANTHE'S Apartment . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Setting
[Retires to an inner apartment . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 184
An Apartment in the Castle. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Setting
 
APE...............11
Here is the forehead of an ape , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 79
A man may be 'twixt ape and Plato; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 7
No one to see my Ape , my Dwarf, my Fool, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 13
Ape , Dwarf, and Fool, why stand you gaping there? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 15
The Dwarf began to tremble and the Ape When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 18
Your poor Ape was a prince, and he, poor thing, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 36
But ape . So pray your highness stay awhile; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 38
Persist and you may be an ape tomorrow." When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 40
The Ape for very fear began to dance, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 48
"My darling Ape , I won't whip you to-day- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 63
Yet lingeringly did the sad Ape forth draw When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 67
 
APENNINE..........1
To spur three leagues towards the Apennine ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 186
 
APES..............1
Of men, and beasts, and fish, and apes , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 14
 
APOLLO............33
Apollo chang'd thee; how thou next didst seem To George Felton Mathew, Line 86
And 'tis right just, for well Apollo knows To My Brother George (epistle), Line 45
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold. On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 4
Trips it before Apollo than the rest. To G.A.W., Line 14
The morning sun-beams to the great Apollo Sleep and Poetry, Line 60
Made great Apollo blush for this his land. Sleep and Poetry, Line 183
For great Apollo bids I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 50
Or young Apollo on the pedestal: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 218
O Delphic Apollo ? God of the golden bow, Line 12
O Delphic Apollo ! God of the golden bow, Line 24
O Delphic Apollo ? God of the golden bow, Line 36
Of thron'd Apollo , could breathe back the lyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 362
Eterne Apollo ! that thy sister fair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 42
For as Apollo each eve doth devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 463
Apollo singeth, while his chariot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 958
By Daphne's fright, behold Apollo !-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 611a
Apollo Apollo to the Graces, S.D. to Line 1
O young Apollo , let me fly along with thee; Apollo to the Graces, Line 8
With the glory and grace of Apollo ! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 16
Or sue the fair Apollo and he will Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 3
And still it cried, ' Apollo ! young Apollo! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 293
And still it cried, ' Apollo! young Apollo ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 293
The morning-bright Apollo ! young Apollo!' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 294
The morning-bright Apollo! young Apollo !' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 294
I fled, it follow'd me, and cried ' Apollo !' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 295
Apollo is once more the golden theme! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 28
Of loveliness new born."- Apollo then, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 79
Die into life: so young Apollo anguish'd: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 130
Apollo shriek'd; and lo! from all his limbs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 135
Nor even Apollo when he sang alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 74
" Apollo ! faded, far flown Apollo! The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 204
"Apollo! faded, far flown Apollo ! The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 204
By great Apollo , thy dear foster child, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 286
 
APOLLO'S..........13
That I should never hear Apollo's song, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 9
Of laurel chaplets, and Apollo's glories; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 45
Apollo's very leaves - woven to bless To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 7
For 'twas the morn: Apollo's upward fire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 95
Such as sat listening round Apollo's pipe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 141
From the exaltation of Apollo's bow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 353
Round every spot where trod Apollo's foot; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 790
Is in Apollo's hand: our dazed eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 726
As doth a flower at Apollo's touch. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 786
Apollo's garland:- yet didst thou divine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 12
Apollo's summer look; In drear nighted December, Line 12
Though bright Apollo's car stood burning here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
Apollo's presence when in act to strike Lamia, Part II, Line 79
 
APOLLONIAN........1
Not hiding up an Apollonian curve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 399
 
APOLLONII.........1
Apollonii , hath Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
APOLLONIUS........6
"Tis Apollonius sage, my trusty guide Lamia, Part I, Line 375
Old Apollonius - from him keep me hid." Lamia, Part II, Line 101
'Twas Apollonius : something too he laugh'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 159
What for the sage, old Apollonius ? Lamia, Part II, Line 222
her, to whose wedding, amongst other guests, came Apollonius ; who, by some Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
wept, and desired Apollonius to be silent, but he would not be moved, and Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
APOPLEXY..........2
Pray heaven it end not in apoplexy ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 49
It went for apoplexy - foolish folks!- The Jealousies, Line 695
 
APPALLING.........2
Then was appalling silence: then a sight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 527
To my appalling , I saw too good proof Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 146
 
APPAREL...........1
Bestridden of gay knights, in gay apparel , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 27
 
APPARELING........1
A new appareling for western skies; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 464
 
APPEAL............2
Grey-growing. To thee only I appeal , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 177
Own'd they the lovelorn piteous appeal : Lamia, Part II, Line 257
 
APPEALING.........1
She lifted up the charm: appealing groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 518
 
APPEAR............5
A dewy flower, oft would that hand appear , Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 41
To the trees and mountains; and there soon appear Sleep and Poetry, Line 137
Of his swift magic. Diving swans appear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 339
Floated into the room, and let appear Lamia, Part II, Line 20
Beautiful slaves, and Lamia's self, appear , Lamia, Part II, Line 208
 
APPEAR'D..........11
Their share of the ditty. After them appear'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 163
Of heaven appear'd to open for my flight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 582
To search it inwards; whence far off appear'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 259
Sighing, an elephant appear'd and bow'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 537
Appear'd , and, stepping to a beauteous corse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 778
Foot-feather'd Mercury appear'd sublime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 331
Until that grove appear'd , as if perchance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 949
Their heads appear'd , and up their stature grew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 87
Appear'd , a sudden host, in the open day. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
I would you had appear'd among those lords, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 61
The day appear'd , and all the gossip rout. Lamia, Part II, Line 146
 
APPEARED..........1
Thoughtless at first, but ere eve's star appeared Lamia, Part I, Line 234
 
APPEARS...........2
Bad reasons for her sorrow, as appears The Jealousies, Line 85
An inch appears the utmost thou couldst budge; The Jealousies, Line 245
 
APPEASE...........1
And by mysterious sleights a hundred thirsts appease ? Lamia, Part I, Line 285
 
APPELLATION.......1
Fit appellation for this dazzling frame? Lamia, Part II, Line 89
 
APPETITE..........6
Sharpening, by degrees, his appetite Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 220
His appetite beyond his natural sphere, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 647
For an embrace, to dull the appetite Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 124
My appetite sharp - for revenge! I'll no sharer Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 135
Forget their tea - forget their appetite . Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 4
Where the white heifers low. And appetite The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 38
 
APPLAUDED.........1
A deed to be applauded , 'scribed in gold! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 149
 
APPLAUSE..........3
Unnumber'd souls breathe out a still applause , Addressed to Haydon, Line 13
Save of blown self- applause , they proudly mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 13
The stage-play emperor to entrap applause , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 144
 
APPLE.............2
O cut the sweet apple and share it! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 20
Of candied apple , quince, and plum, and gourd; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 265
 
APPLES............8
Feed upon apples red, and strawberries, Sleep and Poetry, Line 103
At swelling apples with a frisky leap Sleep and Poetry, Line 361
With silvery oak apples , and fir cones brown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 276
No apples would I gather from the tree, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 147
And asketh where the golden apples grow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 412
And apples , wan with sweetness, gather thee,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 683
Her apples were swart blackberries, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 5
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, To Autumn, Line 5
 
APPLIED...........1
Endymion, with quick hand, the charm applied - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 781
 
APPREHENSION......1
What your quick apprehension will fill up; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 59
 
APPROACH..........3
Ever exalted at the God's approach : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 285
And with slow pace approach our fallen King, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 334
To watch our grand approach , and hail us as we pass'd. The Jealousies, Line 720
 
APPROACH'D........4
The youth approach'd ; oft turning his veil'd eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 263
The nearer I approach'd a flame's gaunt blue, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 492
The herd approach'd ; each guest, with busy brain, Lamia, Part II, Line 150
To be approach'd on either side by steps, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 90
 
APPROACHING.......3
Of nymphs approaching fairly o'er the sward: Sleep and Poetry, Line 365
From some approaching wonder, and behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 363
Cried I, approaching near the horned shrine, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 137
 
APPROVING.........1
Approving all, she faded at self-will, Lamia, Part II, Line 142
 
APRIL.............9
Of April meadows? Here her altar shone, Sleep and Poetry, Line 171
The silvery tears of April ? - Youth of May? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 10
Not flowers budding in an April rain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 971
'Tis the early April lark, Fancy, Line 44
From wholesome drench of April rains, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 5
And hides the green hill in an April shroud; Ode on Melancholy, Line 14
Be like an April day, To Fanny, Line 28
When first for April honey into faint flowers they dive." The Jealousies, Line 261
April the twenty-fourth,- this coming day, The Jealousies, Line 501
 
APRIL'S...........2
With April's tender younglings: next, well trimm'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 138
Green'd over April's lap? No howling sad Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 217
 
APT...............1
Too apt to fall in love with care All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 39
 
AQUA..............1
And as for aqua vitae - there's a mess! The Jealousies, Line 291
 
AQUARIUS..........1
Aquarius ! to whom king Jove has given Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 582


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Published @ RC

March 2005