Ar-As - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
ARAB..............7
What then! No tidings of my friendly Arab ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 36
In my first cup, that Arab ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 51a
Ludolph and the swift Arab are the same; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 3
A certain Arab haunting in these parts. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 120
I knew you through disguise. You are the Arab ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 127
My Arab , no soft music should enrich Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 29
As yesterday the Arab made thee stoop. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110
 
ARABIAN...........2
Frozen in that old tale Arabian . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 406
News of that vanished Arabian , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 41
 
ARABIANS'.........1
With zebras striped, and sleek Arabians' prance, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 244
 
ARABY.............2
With my own steed from Araby ; pluck down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 534
Of precious flowers pluck'd in Araby , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 410
 
ARBITRARY.........1
And to this arbitrary queen of sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 459
 
ARBOUR............8
Had I e'er seen her from an arbour take Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 40
Where nested was an arbour , overwove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 431
So from the arbour roof down swell'd an air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 513
The banquet of my arms, my arbour queen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 498
Since in my arbour I did sing to thee. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 826
Groves, meadows, melodies, and arbour roses; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 939
I saw an arbour with a drooping roof The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 25
The mossy mound and arbour were no more; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 60
 
ARBOURS...........1
At sweet life leaving, and these arbours green,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 17
 
ARCADES...........2
And diamond-paved lustrous long arcades , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 220
And diamond paved lustrous long arcades . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 56
 
ARCADIAN..........3
Arcadian Pan, with such a fearful dread. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 158
As may be read of in Arcadian books; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 140
About Arcadian forests; and will shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 990
 
ARCADY............1
In Tempe or the dales of Arcady ? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 7
 
ARCH..............9
Beneath the curved moon's triumphal arch . To George Felton Mathew, Line 30
The mouldering arch , The Gothic looks solemn, Line 4
An arch face peep'd,- an Oread as I guess'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 671
Forth from a rugged arch , in the dusk below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 639
In another gloomy arch . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 649a
Beyond a silvery shower, was the arch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 852
A Jovian thunderbolt: arch Hebe brings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 415
There's Arch Brook For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 7
The shafted arch and carved fret O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 3
 
ARCH'D............3
A casement high and triple- arch'd there was, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 208
Completed by her twin- arch'd ebon-brows; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 63
Of some arch'd temple door, or dusky colonnade. Lamia, Part I, Line 361
 
ARCHANGEL'S.......1
Catches his freshness from archangel's wing: Addressed to the Same, Line 4
 
ARCHBISHOPS'......1
If either of their two Archbishops' graces The Jealousies, Line 537
 
ARCHED............8
There saw the swan his neck of arched snow, Imitation of Spenser, Line 14
Spenser! thy brows are arched , open, kind, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 49
To admire the visor arched so gracefully Calidore: A Fragment, Line 130
He follow'd through a lowly arched way, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 109
Each arched porch and entry low The Eve of St. Mark, Line 19
Arched every way aloof; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 18
The next our poor Prince fills the arched rooms Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 15
The glowing banquet-room shone with wide- arched grace. Lamia, Part II, Line 121
 
ARCHER............1
Honour to the archer keen! Robin Hood, Line 54
 
ARCHERS...........1
The archers too, upon a wider plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 332
 
ARCHES............3
Which linger yet about lone gothic arches , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 33
Arches , and domes, and fiery galleries; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 180
Arches , and domes, and fiery galeries: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 28
 
ARCHIMAGO.........1
And Archimago leaning o'er his book: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 37
 
ARCHIMAGO'S.......1
Or e'en the touch of Archimago's wand, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 6
 
ARCHING...........1
Went arching up, and like two magic ploughs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 222
 
ARCHINGS..........1
The very archings of her eye-lids charm Sleep and Poetry, Line 238
 
ARCHITECTED.......1
This was architected thus Not Aladdin magian, Line 27
 
ARCS..............1
Circles, and arcs , and broad-belting colure, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 274
 
ARDENCY...........1
Are things to brood on with more ardency Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 33
 
ARDENT............5
Next, thy Tasso's ardent numbers Ode to Apollo, Line 36
And die away in ardent mutterings. Sleep and Poetry, Line 40
Of thy wide heaven; yet, to my ardent prayer, Sleep and Poetry, Line 55
Ye ardent marigolds! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 48
Than speak against this ardent listlessness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 825
 
ARDENTLY..........1
Call ardently ! He was indeed wayworn; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 655
 
ARDOUR............3
And had such manly ardour in his eye, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 148
Or warm my breast with ardour to unfold To My Brother George (epistle), Line 17
If smiles, if dimples, tongues for ardour mute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 441
 
ARDOURS...........2
With all my ardours : thou wast the deep glen; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 163
Her tender heart, and its warm ardours fann'd The Jealousies, Line 116
 
ARETHUSA..........5
"O Arethusa , peerless nymph! why fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 936
So softly, Arethusa , that I think Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 976
Sweet Arethusa ! Dian's self must feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 984
Unhappy Arethusa ! thou wast late Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1007
The name of Arethusa . On the verge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1012
 
ARGENT............6
Commingling with her argent spheres did roll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 595
One thought beyond thy argent luxuries! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 186
At length burst in the argent revelry, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 37
Possess'd for glory, two fair argent wings, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 284
And rubious- argent : of all these bereft, Lamia, Part I, Line 163
The Imaian 'scutcheon bright,- one mouse in argent field. The Jealousies, Line 585
 
ARGONAUTS.........1
After the Argonauts , in blind amaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 347
 
ARGOSY............1
Manna and dates, in argosy transferr'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 268
 
ARGUES............1
Such salutation argues a glad heart Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 130
 
ARGUING...........1
Saw this with pain, so arguing a want Lamia, Part II, Line 35
 
ARGUMENTS.........1
Who prov'st, with jolting arguments and bitter, The Jealousies, Line 233
 
ARGUS.............2
When lulled Argus , baffled, swoon'd and slept, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 2
A dull-eyed Argus watching for a fare; The Jealousies, Line 249
 
ARIADNE...........1
Since Ariadne was a vintager, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 443
 
ARIADNE'S.........2
Made Ariadne's cheek look blushingly. Sleep and Poetry, Line 336
Sprinkled with stars, like Ariadne's tiar: Lamia, Part I, Line 58
 
ARIGHT............6
If ceremonies due they did aright ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 50
You guess aright . And, sister, slurring o'er Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 21
Could not see all his parent's love aright , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 101
Your lady sister, if I guess aright , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 171
Thus gentle Lamia judg'd, and judg'd aright , Lamia, Part I, Line 334
"Mortal, that thou may'st understand aright , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 1
 
ARION'S...........1
Arion's magic to the Atlantic isles; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 360
 
ARISE.............9
Till their stern forms before my mind arise : Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 11
Arise ! awake! Clear summer has forth walk'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 502
" Arise , good youth, for sacred Phoebus' sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 292
Arise then! for the hen-dove shall not hatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1025
Arise - arise! the morning is at hand;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 345
Arise - arise ! the morning is at hand;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 345
Awake! arise ! my love, and fearless be, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 350
O Titans, shall I say ' Arise !'- Ye groan: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 157
Romeo! Arise ! take snuffers by the handle; Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 14
 
ARISES............1
Still time is fleeting, and no dream arises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 9
 
ARK...............1
And the Covenantal Ark , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 36
 
ARM...............22
Would passion arm me for the enterprize: Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 4
Of all unworthiness; and how the strong of arm Calidore: A Fragment, Line 144
'Tis might half slumb'ring on its own right arm . Sleep and Poetry, Line 237
On one white arm , and tenderly unclos'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 404
Anon upon that giant's arm I'll be, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 243
Upon his arm he braces Pallas' shield, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 413
We're safe enough; here in this arm -chair sit, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 106
Thus whispering, his warm, unnerved arm The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 280
I will advance a terrible right arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 248
Came booming thus, while still upon his arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 307
Are ye not smitten by a youngling arm ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 318
Pluck'd witless the weak flowers, till thine arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 74
And, to say truth, in any Christian arm Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
His eye not downcast, and his folded arm , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 90
Still to rejoice that 'twas a German arm Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 4
And he put out an arm to bid me mount, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
Still whole. I have surviv'd. My arm is strong,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 134
To the swoon'd serpent, and with languid arm , Lamia, Part I, Line 132
And stretch'd her white arm through the hollow dark, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 455
That soldiers may bear witness how my arm King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 28
There, put it underneath your royal arm ; The Jealousies, Line 515
Under one arm the magic book he bore, The Jealousies, Line 606
 
ARM'D.............1
Queen Venus leaning downward open arm'd : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 526
 
ARMFULS...........1
And the tann'd harvesters rich armfuls took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 441
 
ARMIDA............1
Of Armida the fair, and Rinaldo the bold? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 8
 
ARMIDA'S..........1
That gave soft music from Armida's bowers, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 31
 
ARMOUR............1
His armour was so dexterously wrought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 116
 
ARMOURIES.........1
Empty these armouries , these treasuries, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 154
 
ARMOURY...........2
That rebel Jove's whole armoury were spent, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 312
One from Bellona's gleaming armoury , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 2
 
ARMS..............50
There Homer with his nervous arms Ode to Apollo, Line 7
And intertwined the cassia's arms unite, To George Felton Mathew, Line 43
That nestled in his arms . A dimpled hand, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 93
His warm arms , thrilling now with pulses new, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 102
Enough their whitest arms in silence clinging: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 11
Some tale of love and arms in time of old. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 18
Michael in arms , and more, meek Eve's fair slenderness. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 59
Between their arms ; some, clear in youthful bloom, Sleep and Poetry, Line 145
Who feel their arms , and breasts, and kiss and stare, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 229
Dead heavy - arms and shoulders gleam awhile: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 13
Her languid arms in silver slumber dying: Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 3
The wooing arms which held me, and did give Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 654
Of icy pinnacles, and dipp'dst thine arms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 208
Faint through his careless arms ; content to see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 463
To your dimpled arms . Once more sweet life begin!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 506
Into thine arms ; to scare Aurora's train, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 696
Stretching his indolent arms , he took, O bliss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 712
Be ever in these arms ? in this sweet spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 741
His empty arms together, hung his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 858
Her soft arms were entwining me, and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 270
I sought for her smooth arms and lips, to slake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 478
The banquet of my arms , my arbour queen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 498
Had died in mutual arms devout and true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 793
Their cradling arms , and purpos'd to convey Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1017
For tenderness the arms so idly lain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 61
His plump white arms , and shoulders, enough white Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 213
Spreading her perfect arms upon the air, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 239
And slumber in the arms of melody, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 193
To me his arms were spread, to me his voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 324
Then Thea spread abroad her trembling arms Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 89
Her arms as one who prophesied.- At length Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 134
O what can ail thee, knight at arms , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 1
O what can ail thee, knight at arms , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 5
Their arms embraced, and their pinions too; Ode to Psyche, Line 16
Though hemm'd around by thy victorious arms . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 197
When will he take that grandchild in his arms , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 119
Nor let these arms paternal hunger more Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 123
Thine arms from forth a pulpit of hot fire Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 91
Here is the Duke, waiting with open arms Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 249
The Emperor, with cross'd arms , in thought. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 277b
Her arms are stiff,- her fingers clench'd and cold! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 188
[Staggers and falls into their arms . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 189b
Tiptoe with white arms spread. He, sick to lose Lamia, Part I, Line 287
And Lycius' arms were empty of delight, Lamia, Part II, Line 307
See, with cross'd arms they sit - ah hapless crew, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 5
Whose arms spread straggling in wild serpent forms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 447
And slumber in the arms of melody, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 37
Faded the shape of beauty from my arms , The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 7
Let once again these aching arms be placed, What can I do to drive away, Line 50
A hopeless bustle 'mid our swarming arms ; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 11
 
ARMY..............1
Through which this Paphian army took its march, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 853
 
ARNE..............1
By Arne delighted, or by Handel madden'd; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 111
 
ARNO..............1
Of Lapland thinks on sweet Arno ; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 26
 
ARNO'S............1
Rode past fair Florence, to where Arno's stream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 210
 
AROSE.............15
A shout from the whole multitude arose , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 308
So vanish'd: and not long, before arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 651
The nymph arose : he left them to their joy, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 782
All were re-animated. There arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 790
At every onward step proud domes arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 836
The youth at once arose : a placid lake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1028
At these voluptuous accents, he arose , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 317
Bertha arose and read awhile, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 48
A mist arose , as from a scummy marsh. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 258
Hyperion arose , and on the stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 350
Arose , with locks not oozy, and began, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 170
Arose and knelt before him, wept a rain Lamia, Part II, Line 66
One minist'ring; and there arose a flame. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 96
A midday fleece of clouds. Thea arose The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 454
"At half-past three arose the cheerful moon- The Jealousies, Line 685
 
AROUND............48
And all around it dipp'd luxuriously Imitation of Spenser, Line 28
Thy heaven-born radiance around me shed, To Hope, Line 23
The while he tells of grief, around a funeral pyre. Ode to Apollo, Line 17
And smiles at the far clearness all around , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 7
Its long lost grandeur: fir trees grow around , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 40
We hear around when Hesperus is coming. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 161
And while, for rhymes, I search around the poles, To My Brothers, Line 5
Light hoverer around our happy pillows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 13
So that we look around with prying stare, Sleep and Poetry, Line 32
Eternally around a dizzy void? Sleep and Poetry, Line 177
It keeps eternal whisperings around On the Sea, Line 1
Stems thronging all around between the swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 83
Around the breathed boar: again I'll poll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 481
Around the western border of the wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 542
Loiter'd around us; then of honey cells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 668
Endymion sought around , and shook each bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 94
Around their axle! Then these gleaming reins, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 190
Of all these things around us." He did so, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 455
Around thine aged top, and thy clear fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 722
Above, around , and at his feet; save things Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 121
It seem'd to whirl around me, and a swoon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 416
Sepulchral from the distance all around . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 486
And all around her shapes, wizard and brute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 500
And all around - But wherefore this to thee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 633
Came gold around me, cheering me to cope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 686
Those files of dead, scatter the same around , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 770
Around giddy Endymion; seeing he Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1006
There curl'd a purple mist around them; soon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 367
It seem'd as when around the pale new moon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 368
Dark regions are around it, where the tombs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 516
Around me beeches and high chestnuts shed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 300
And all around each eye's sepulchral cell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 404
Midst of the quiet all around thee! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 28
For there were sleeping dragons all around , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 353
Around my bed its lulling charities. Sonnet to Sleep, Line 8
Far, far around shall those dark-cluster'd trees Ode to Psyche, Line 54
Cluster'd around by all her starry Fays; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 37
Though hemm'd around by thy victorious arms. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 197
Hover around that life, whose bitter days Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 33
For lo! the toils are spread around your den, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 67
Should be unloop'd around to curtain her; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 229
Around the silken couches, wondering Lamia, Part II, Line 197
Around his demon eyes! Corinthians, see! Lamia, Part II, Line 289
I look'd around upon the carved sides The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 61
Sending forth Maian incense, spread around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 103
And look'd around , and saw his kingdom gone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 401
Of Saturn fill'd the mossy glooms around The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 407
That she around him flutter'd, flirted, toy'd, The Jealousies, Line 110
 
AROUS'D...........2
Her motherly cheeks. Arous'd from this sad mood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 343
There hollow sounds arous'd me, and I sigh'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 651
 
ARRAS.............1
The arras , rich with horseman, hawk, and hound, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 358
 
ARRAY.............5
Huge sea-marks; vanward swelling in array , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 830
While past the vision went in bright array . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 562
With plume, tiara, and all rich array , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 38
Wrench'd with an iron hand from firm array , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 5
Upon their wings, they bore in bright array , The Jealousies, Line 35
 
ARRIVALS..........1
Among the fresh arrivals in our empery. The Jealousies, Line 189
 
ARRIVE............1
O to arrive each Monday morn from Ind, To J.R., Line 9
 
ARRIVED...........1
While yet he spake they had arrived before Lamia, Part I, Line 378
 
ARRIVING..........1
Arriving at the portal, gaz'd amain, Lamia, Part II, Line 151
 
ARROW.............4
Fleet as an arrow through unfathom'd brine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 627
The Centaur's arrow ready seems to pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 597
Nor could an arrow light, or javelin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 795
Young Ludolph, like a fiery arrow , shot Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 276
 
ARROW'S...........1
Of circumstance; yea, seize the arrow's barb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 344
 
ARROWS............2
Where with thy silver bow and arrows keen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 304
As of a thunder cloud. When arrows fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 326
 
ARROWY............1
A fan-shaped burst of blood-red, arrowy fire, The Jealousies, Line 663
 
ARSE.................1
His seat upon thine a-e , All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 26
 
ART...............77
Keep thy chains burst, and boldly say thou art free; On Peace, Line 12
That thou of love an emblem art ; Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 6
But this is past. Thou art among the stars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 9
When thou art dead, and all thy wretched crew? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 14
Ah! courteous Sir Knight, with large joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 17
Adieu, valiant Eric! with joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 41
And when thou art weary, I'll find thee a bed, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 9
Thou art an enchantress too, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 66
Art thou most lovely? When gone far astray To G.A.W., Line 3
All through my bosom: thou art as a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 467
And said, " Art thou so pale, who wast so bland Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 517
Seeing thou art so gentle. Could I weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 106
Of Cupids shun thee, too divine art thou, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 180
How beautiful thou art ! The world how deep! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 188
Art thou now forested? O woodland Queen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 305
Thou art a wanderer, and thy presence here Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 434
Art thou wayworn, or canst not further trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 651
My breath of life, where art thou? High above, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 687
Old Atlas' children? Art a maid of the waters, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 690
Or art , impossible! a nymph of Dian's, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 692
For very idleness? Where'er thou art , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 694
How can we part? Elysium! who art thou? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 753
If thou art powerful, these lovers' pains; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1016
Takes glimpses of thee; thou art a relief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 66
Cynthia! where art thou now? What far abode Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 72
"Thou art the man! Now shall I lay my head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 234
Thou art the man!" Endymion started back Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 255
Thou art commission'd to this fated spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 298
The dew of her rich speech: ' Ah! Art awake? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 429
Such cool and sorrowful offerings, thou art fond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 438
If thou art ripe to taste a long love dream; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 440
Immortal, for thou art of heavenly race: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 589
Waits at the doors of heaven. Thou art not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 959
Thou art my executioner, and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 111
Thou art her mother, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 288
Ah, Zephyrus! art here, and Flora too! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 570
Art thou not cruel? Ever have I striven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 736
Art thou so fruitful? or dost thou beguile To the Nile, Line 6
When in an eye thou art , alive with fate! Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 14
"Love! thou art leading me from wintry cold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 65
And thou art distant in Humanity. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 312
Thou answer'st not, for thou art dead asleep; To Ailsa Rock, Line 9
Mumchance art thou with both obliged to part. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 14
"What is this and what art thou?" Not Aladdin magian, Line 19
"What art thou and what is this?" Not Aladdin magian, Line 21
Bard art thou completely! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 48
Bard art thou completely!- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 51
"A cruel man and impious thou art : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 140
Thou art my heaven, and I thine eremite: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 277
How chang'd thou art ! how pallid, chill, and drear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 311
Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art - Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 1
Of these new-form'd art thou, oh brightest child! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 319
Art thou, too, near such doom? vague fear there is: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 327
Yet do thou strive; as thou art capable, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 337
But for this reason, that thou art the King, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 184
So art thou not the last; it cannot be: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 189
Thou art not the beginning nor the end. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 190
For thou art weak to sing such tumults dire: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 4
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad Ode to a Nightingale, Line 57
Why thou art desolate, can e'er return. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 40
Thou art wrong; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 181b
Albert, thou art the minion! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 260a
That I should claim your pity! Art not well? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
Begone! I pity thee; thou art a gull, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 101
Go no further; not a step more. Thou art Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 1
Strike for the Cretan isle; and here thou art ! Lamia, Part I, Line 79
Its most ambiguous atoms with sure art ; Lamia, Part I, Line 196
Thou art a scholar, Lycius, and must know Lamia, Part I, Line 279
"Thou art no poet; may'st not tell thy dreams"? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 12
These steps, die on that marble where thou art . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 108
Of what thou now art on that pavement cold. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 113
And thou art here, for thou art less than they. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 166
And thou art here, for thou art less than they. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 166
To the great world? Thou art a dreaming thing; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 168
Such things as thou art are admitted oft The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 178
Pendent.- " Art thou not of the dreamer tribe? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 198
For the broad marble knees; and who thou art , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 214
 
ARTEGALL..........1
When, meeting Artegall and Talus grim, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 8
 
ARTICLE...........2
An article made up of calumny The Jealousies, Line 104
Tinder's a lighter article ,- nitre pure The Jealousies, Line 294
 
ARTICULATE........2
Is most articulate ; where hopes infest; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 540
Comes articulate , and presseth Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 14
 
ARTILLERY.........1
Where falling stars dart their artillery forth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 642
 
ARTISTS...........1
Ye artists lovelorn, madmen that ye are! On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 12
 
ARTLESS...........1
Happy is England, sweet her artless daughters; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 9
 
ASBESTUS..........1
Which needs had been of dyed asbestus wove, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 74
 
ASCEND............1
Language pronounc'd. "If thou canst not ascend The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 107
 
ASCENDING.........1
And was ascending quick to put cold grasp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 124
 
ASCENT............1
Were of more soft ascent than lazar stairs?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 124
 
ASH...............2
High as the berries of a wild ash tree, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 114
Branch down sweeping from a tall ash top, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 335
 
ASHAMED...........1
And wherefore so ashamed ? 'Tis but to atone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 787
 
ASHEN.............1
With the young ashen boughs, 'gainst which it rests, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 21
 
ASHES.............6
Rough ashes sat he for his soul's reprieve, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 26
For aye unsought for slept among his ashes cold. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 378
Is to be ashes !- wither'd up to death! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 194
But from the ashes of disgrace he rose Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 134
Is- Love, forgive us!- cinders, ashes , dust; Lamia, Part II, Line 2
Whiten'd with ashes , and its lang'rous flame, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 238
 
ASHORE............1
As one who sits ashore and longs perchance To Homer, Line 3
 
ASIA..............1
Asia , born of most enormous Caf, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 53
 
ASIAN.............2
With Asian elephants: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 242
No Asian poppy, nor elixir fine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 47
 
ASIDE.............12
Softly they blew aside the taper's flame; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 153
Pull droopingly, in slanting curve aside , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 4
So did he feel, who pull'd the boughs aside , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 151
Her self-possession - swung the lute aside , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 504
Of youth and beauty should be thrown aside Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 455
The tapers keep aside an hour and more, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 31
( aside ) Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, S.D. to Line 129
[ Aside . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 143
( aside ) Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 117
( Aside .) Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 59
( aside ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 254
Turn them aside , wretch! or the righteous ban Lamia, Part II, Line 278
 
ASK...............19
Ask nought so heavenward, so too - too high: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 549
There was no one to ask me why I wept,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 184
Ask me no more! I may not utter it, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 756
No tongue shall ask , whence come ye? but ye shall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 822
Did last eve ask my promise to refine Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 3
Will ye give me some cream if I ask it? Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 4
To-morrow will I ask my lady's boon."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 28
Why were they proud? again we ask aloud, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 127
Of thee we now should ask forgiving boon, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 146
To ask him where her basil was; and why Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 494
Too great a boon! I pr'ythee, let me ask Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 141
To do you every service you can ask . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 32
Ask your own soldiers. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 97a
Ask you for her receipt for love philtres. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 15
Best ask your lady sister, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 70b
I ask , great judge, if you to-day have put Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 157
You should not ask me that, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 119b
Thou canst not ask me with thee here to roam Lamia, Part I, Line 276
Ask what you will,- I'll give you my new bride! The Jealousies, Line 529
 
ASK'D.............5
Twice hast thou ask'd whither I went: henceforth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 755
She ask'd her brothers, with an eye all pale, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 258
And last, pointing to Corinth, ask'd her sweet, Lamia, Part I, Line 342
I have not ask'd it, ever thinking thee Lamia, Part II, Line 86
"Where does she live?" ask'd Hum. "Her fair locks curl The Jealousies, Line 385
 
ASKETH............1
And asketh where the golden apples grow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 412
 
ASKING............1
Asking for her lost basil amorously; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 490
 
ASLEEP............18
And then I fell asleep . Ah, can I tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 572
Lay, half asleep , in grass and rushes cool, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 134
Her gentle limbs, and left the youth asleep .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 852
Wilt fall asleep ? O let me sip that tear! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 318
And he's awake who thinks himself asleep . O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 14
Asleep ! O sleep a little while, white pearl, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 1
Thou answer'st not, for thou art dead asleep ; To Ailsa Rock, Line 9
All the house is asleep , but we know very well Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 2
And Madeline asleep in lap of legends old. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 135
Where asleep they fall betimes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 65
And, seeing it asleep , so fled away- As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 6
And there she lulled me asleep , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 33
He doth this moment wish himself asleep Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 91
'Tis good,- 'tis good; let him but fall asleep , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 49
Or on a half-reap'd furrow sound asleep , To Autumn, Line 16
"He's not asleep , and you have little wit," The Jealousies, Line 329
Cinque-parted danced, some half asleep reposed The Jealousies, Line 690
The Princess fell asleep , and, in her dream, The Jealousies, Line 710
 
ASP...............1
Or swallow'd by my hunger-starved asp ,- The Jealousies, Line 197
 
ASPEN.............3
With fingers cool as aspen leaves. Sweet love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 804
He spake, and, trembling like an aspen -bough, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 746
Shook horrid with such aspen -malady: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 94
 
ASPHODEL..........2
Through unknown things; till exhaled asphodel , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 663
On the May-grown asphodel . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 28
 
ASPICS............1
With the aspics at her breast; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 17
 
ASPIRANT..........1
Yields to my step aspirant ? why should I Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 93
 
ASPIRING..........3
Of the aspiring boy; who as he led Calidore: A Fragment, Line 128
Aspiring as a Tartar khan, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 68
Of an aspiring life! My boyhood past Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 9
 
ASS...............1
And near him rode Silenus on his ass , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 215
 
ASSAIL............1
There is no other crime, no mad assail Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 155
 
ASSAIL'D..........1
Damp awe assail'd me; for there 'gan to boom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 484
 
ASSAULT...........3
With many more, the brawniest in assault , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 21
The eagle Otho to beat off assault . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
I cannot, in plain terms, grossly assault Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 57
 
ASSAY.............2
On humbler thoughts, and let this strange assay Sleep and Poetry, Line 313
Must I burn through; once more humbly assay On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 7
 
ASSEMBLED.........1
Stubborn'd with iron. All were not assembled : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 17
 
ASSEMBLY..........2
Soon the assembly , in a circle rang'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 185
The fair assembly wander'd to and fro, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 804
 
ASSUAGE...........1
By our eternal hopes, to soothe, to assuage , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1015
 
ASSUR'D...........1
And he in loneliness: he felt assur'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 590
 
ASSURE............1
He has, assure yourself, by some strange means, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 8
 
ASSURED...........1
Trust me for once. That you may be assured Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 32
 
ASTHMA............1
For all the wheezy asthma - and for all To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 10
 
ASTONIED..........1
I see, astonied , that severe content Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 165
 
ASTONISH..........1
Then you astonish me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 105b
 
ASTONISHMENT......4
For Greece and England. While astonishment Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 254
Whole days and days in sheer astonishment ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 385
I am wound up in deep astonishment ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 117
You chill me with astonishment ! How's this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 215
 
ASTOUNDED.........1
Astounded ,- Cupid, I / do thee defy! The Jealousies, Line 455
 
ASTRAY............1
Art thou most lovely? When gone far astray To G.A.W., Line 3
 
ASTROLOGER'S......1
An astrologer's old quill Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 16
 
ASTROLOGERS.......1
Which sages and keen-eyed astrologers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 278
 
ASYLUM............1
O bless'd asylum ! Comfortable home! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 100


Published @ RC

March 2005