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Keats Concordance
 
'BOUT.............1
'Bout shame and pity. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 43a
 
'BOVE.............3
Ethereal for pleasure; 'bove his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 672
Aye, 'bove the withering of old-lipp'd Fate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 29
A gold-green zenith 'bove the Sea-God's head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 878
 
'CROSS............1
'Cross the broad table, to beseech a glance Lamia, Part II, Line 243
 
'E................1
Whimpering away my reason! Hark 'e , sir,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 97
 
'EM...............2
And kiss'd 'em all unheard. Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 8
"I'll trounce 'em !- there's the square-cut chancellor, The Jealousies, Line 145
 
'FAITH............1
And no news! No news! 'Faith ! 'tis very strange Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 74
 
'FORE.............3
My sullen steps; another 'fore my eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 605
'Fore which I'll bend, bending, dear love, to thee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 712
Came sudden 'fore my face, and brush'd against my hat. The Jealousies, Line 675
 
'GAINST...........16
With the young ashen boughs, 'gainst which it rests, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 21
'Gainst the smooth surface, and to mark anon, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 17
While 'gainst his forehead he devoutly press'd Calidore: A Fragment, Line 105
Staying their wavy bodies 'gainst the streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 73
In the sun's eye, and 'gainst my temples press To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 6
'Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 18
To where thick myrtle branches, 'gainst his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 378
A war-song of defiance 'gainst all hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 603
Of amber 'gainst their faces levelling. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 838
And on the very bark 'gainst which he leant Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 787
With forehead 'gainst the window pane; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 49
No treason 'gainst his head in deed or word! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
To muster kites and eagles 'gainst my head? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 87
My liege, what proof should I have 'gainst a fame Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 216
The strength of twenty lions 'gainst a lamb! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 59
Where 'gainst a column he leant thoughtfully Lamia, Part I, Line 316
 
'GAN..............16
To as sweet a silence, when I 'gan retrace Sleep and Poetry, Line 352
At which he straightway started, and 'gan tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 297
Sudden a poplar's height, and 'gan to enclose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 607
Endymion sat down, and 'gan to ponder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 886
He rose in silence, and once more 'gan fare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 118
Look'd high defiance. Lo! his heart 'gan warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 282
Damp awe assail'd me; for there 'gan to boom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 484
Until their grieved bodies 'gan to bloat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 525
O'erpowered me - it sank. Then 'gan abate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 674
Young Phoebe's, golden hair'd; and so 'gan crave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 451
Then 'gan she work again; nor stay'd her care, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 375
The silver, snarling trumpets 'gan to chide: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 31
Just as he made his vow, it 'gan to rain, The Jealousies, Line 224
Eban especially, who on the floor 'gan The Jealousies, Line 339
Then the magician solemnly 'gan frown, The Jealousies, Line 505
To scrape a little favour, 'gan to coax The Jealousies, Line 698
 
'HAVIOUR..........2
With 'haviour soft. Sleep yawned from underneath. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 464
Of such deliberate prologue, serious 'haviour . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51
 
'HIND.............1
But 'hind the door, I love kissing more- Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 7
 
'MID..............18
Yet as a Tuscan 'mid the snow Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 25
'Mid contradictions her delights to lend. To George Felton Mathew, Line 34
And reaching fingers, 'mid a luscious heap Sleep and Poetry, Line 362
When 'mid acclaim, and feasts, and garlands gay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 888
Through mossy rocks; where, 'mid exuberant green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 992
My sports were lonely, 'mid continuous roars, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 340
And thou wilt see the issue."- 'Mid the sound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 771
Skulks to his cavern, 'mid the gruff complaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 952
'Mid bead and spangle, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 46
'Mid looks of love, defiance, hate, and scorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 69
Spreading a shade: the Naiad 'mid her reeds Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 13
'Mid water mint and cresses dim; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 34
'Mid hush'd, cool-rooted flowers, fragrant-eyed, Ode to Psyche, Line 13
Of honour 'mid the growling wilderness. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 12
Blush'd into roses 'mid his golden hair, Lamia, Part I, Line 25
At Venus' temple porch, 'mid baskets heap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 317
A hopeless bustle 'mid our swarming arms; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 11
In silken tents, and 'mid light fragrance dozed, The Jealousies, Line 692
 
'MONG.............16
And tears 'mong the dewdrops of morning oft glistened. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 32
'Mong the light skimming gondolas far parted, To George Felton Mathew, Line 15
'Mong which the nightingales have always sung To George Felton Mathew, Line 46
Pry 'mong the stars, to strive to think divinely: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 8
Passion their voices cooingly 'mong myrtles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 248
'Mong shepherds gone in eld, whose looks increas'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 358
'Mong which it gurgled blythe adieus, to mock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 938
'Mong lilies, like the youngest of the brood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 100
To nurse the golden age 'mong shepherd clans: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 896
O Moon! the oldest shades 'mong oldest trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 52
And take a dream 'mong rushes Stygian, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 505
'Mong men, are pleasures real as real may be: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 852
And the black-elm tops 'mong the freezing stars, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 3
And in the midst, 'mong thousand heraldries, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 214
'Mong the blossoms white and red. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 10
Your temper elsewhere, 'mong these burly tents, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
 
'MONGST...........1
'Mongst boughs pavillion'd, where the deer's swift leap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 7
 
'NEATH............2
'Neath smothering parsley, and a hazy light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 230
A faery city, 'neath the potent rule The Jealousies, Line 3
 
'NOINT............1
O let me 'noint them with the heaven's light! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 324
 
'NOINTED..........1
But a fierce demon 'nointed safe from wounds King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 32
 
'S................3
Making the best of 's way towards Soho. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 12
Tight at 's back There was a naughty boy, Line 19
That 's Majesty was in a raving fit." The Jealousies, Line 326
 
'SCAPE............3
His soul will 'scape us - O felicity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 763
And 'scape at once from Hope's accursed bands; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 230
Her wits to 'scape away to Angle-land; The Jealousies, Line 114
 
'SCRIBED..........1
A deed to be applauded, 'scribed in gold! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 149
 
'SCUTCHEON........1
The Imaian 'scutcheon bright,- one mouse in argent field. The Jealousies, Line 585
 
'SCUTCHEON'D......1
Carve it upon my 'scutcheon'd sepulchre. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 33
 
'SDAINS...........1
Who 'sdains to yield to any but his peer, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 43
 
'SDEIGN'D.........1
He 'sdeign'd the swine-herd at the wassel bowl, Character of C.B., Line 13
 
'SLANT............1
'Slant to a light Ionic portico, The Jealousies, Line 749
 
'STEAD............5
Two liquid pulse streams 'stead of feather'd wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 583
And 'stead of supper she would stare Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 15
And then for supper, 'stead of soup and poaches, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 14
'Stead of one fatted calf, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 129b
" 'Stead of his anxious Majesty and court The Jealousies, Line 757
 
'TIRE.............1
Bring me some mourning weeds, that I may 'tire Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 93
 
'TWAS.............62
A fresh-blown musk-rose; 'twas the first that threw To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 6
Why westward turn? 'Twas but to say adieu! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 141
'Twas but to kiss my hand, dear George, to you! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 142
Their youth away, and die? 'Twas even so: Sleep and Poetry, Line 219
Oh! 'twas born to die. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 8
Among the shepherds, 'twas believed ever, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 73
For 'twas the morn: Apollo's upward fire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 95
With quivering ore: 'twas even an awful shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 352
In which her voice should wander. 'Twas a lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 493
And press'd me by the hand: Ah! 'twas too much; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 636
My eyes at once to death: but 'twas to live, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 655
If any said 'twas love: and yet 'twas love; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 730
If any said 'twas love: and yet 'twas love; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 730
'Twas there I got them, from the gaps and slits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 876
All torment from my breast;- 'twas even then, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 927
'Twas far too strange, and wonderful for sadness; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 219
Old darkness from his throne: 'twas like the sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 246
But 'twas not long; for, sweeter than the rill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 339
Is miserable. 'Twas even so with this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 372
Not of these days, but long ago 'twas told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 830
'Twas with slow, languid paces, and face hid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 872
And call it love? Alas, 'twas cruelty. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 972
O 'twas a cruel thing."- "Now thou dost taunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 975
Of his heart's blood: 'twas very sweet; he stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 107
'Twas freedom! and at once I visited Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 391
Until 'twas too fierce agony to bear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 410
"When I awoke, 'twas in a twilight bower; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 418
I look'd - 'twas Scylla! Cursed, cursed Circe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 619
'Twas vast, and desolate, and icy-cold; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 632
'Twas done: and straight with sudden swell and fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 766
Death felt it to his inwards: 'twas too much: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 787
'Twas Bacchus and his crew! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 196
'Twas Bacchus and his kin! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 199
'Twas Sleep slow journeying with head on pillow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 370
And then 'twas fit that from this mortal state Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 991
Among the breakers.- 'Twas a quiet eve; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 89
When 'twas their plan to coax her by degrees Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 167
'Twas love; cold,- dead indeed, but not dethroned. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 400
'Twas hid from her: "For cruel 'tis," said she, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 495
'Twas his trade There was a naughty boy, Line 87
By the dusk curtains:- 'twas a midnight charm The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 282
O shadows! 'twas a time to bid farewell! Ode on Indolence, Line 49
Thou clod of yesterday - 'twas not myself! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
'Twas for yourself you labour'd - not for me! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 114
Still to rejoice that 'twas a German arm Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 4
I do believe you. No 'twas not to make Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 37
'Twas done in memory of my boyish days, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 40
Young man, you heard this virgin say 'twas false,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 122
'Twas with some people out of common reach; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 43
Wring hands; embrace; and swear how lucky 'twas Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 251
Moved 'twas with careful steps, and hush'd as death: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 4
Late on that eve, as 'twas the night before Lamia, Part I, Line 319
If 'twas too far that night for her soft feet. Lamia, Part I, Line 343
Fierce and sanguineous as 'twas possible Lamia, Part II, Line 76
'Twas Apollonius: something too he laugh'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 159
And solve and melt:- 'twas just as he foresaw. Lamia, Part II, Line 162
'Twas icy, and the cold ran through his veins; Lamia, Part II, Line 251
'Twas not the glance itself made nursey flinch, The Jealousies, Line 69
" 'Twas twelve o'clock at night, the weather fine, The Jealousies, Line 642
The city of Balk- 'twas Balk beyond all doubt: The Jealousies, Line 679
Wish'd, trusted, hoped 'twas no sign of decay- The Jealousies, Line 714
Thank heaven, I'm hearty yet!- 'twas no such thing:- The Jealousies, Line 715
 
'TWEEN............1
And 'tween the curtains peep'd, where, lo!- how fast she slept. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 252
 
'TWERE............4
'Twere better far to hide my foolish face? Sleep and Poetry, Line 272
To breathe away as 'twere all scummy slime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 330
And then 'twere pity, but fate's gentle shears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 580
Ah! would 'twere so with many In drear nighted December, Line 17
 
'TWILL............6
The o'erwhelming sweets, 'twill bring to me the fair Sleep and Poetry, Line 62
A little patience, youth! 'twill not be long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 908
And at the least 'twill startle off her cares." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 40
'Twill not be Gersa's fault. Otho, farewell! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 151
'Twill be impossible, while the broad day Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 24
Her work-box, and 'twill help your purpose dearly; The Jealousies, Line 525
 
'TWIXT............8
Towards him a large eagle, 'twixt whose wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 658
'Twixt Nothing and Creation, I here swear, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 41
That skims, or dives, or sleeps, 'twixt cape and cape. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 204
Rest for a space 'twixt Cairo and Decan? To the Nile, Line 8
'Twixt growth and waning. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 28
A man may be 'twixt ape and Plato; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 7
Have sworn divorcement 'twixt me and my right. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 116
Smote 'twixt the horns by the death-stunning mace Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 131
 
'TWOULD...........11
'Twould make the Poet quarrel with the rose. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 46
As if, athirst with so much toil, 'twould sip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 88
My own dear will, 'twould be a deadly bane. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 960
Yet look upon it, and 'twould size and swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 206
Of colour'd phantasy; for I fear 'twould trouble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 642
Methinks 'twould be a guilt - a very guilt- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 134
I dare not. 'Twould pollute so good a father! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 99
Draw not the sword; 'twould make an uproar, Duke, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 169
You may not, sire; 'twould overwhelm him quite, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 17
Perhaps 'twould be Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 138c
'Twould humour many a heart to leave them thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 396
 
'YOND.............1
What are the cities 'yond the Alps to me, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 18
 
1.................2
Sect. 2. Memb. 1 . Subs. 1. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Sect. 2. Memb. 1. Subs. 1 . Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
1743..............1
Of 1743 ? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 14
 
2.................2
women." Terence's Eunuch. Act 2 . Sc. 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
Sect. 2 . Memb. 1. Subs. 1. Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
3.................1
Melancholy." Part 3 . Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
4.................1
women." Terence's Eunuch. Act 2. Sc. 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
 
7.................1
To No. 7 , just beyond the Circus gay. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 17


 

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March 2005