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Keats Concordance
 
B.................3
May like to Peter B . O grant that like to Peter I, Line 2
Somewhere in the column headed letter B The Jealousies, Line 101
The Viscount B . shall live at cut-and-run; The Jealousies, Line 157
 
BAAING............1
Their baaing vanities, to browse away Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 3
 
BAAL..............1
To Lucifer or Baal , when he'd pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 892
 
BAALITES..........1
It may not be - those Baalites of pelf, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 451
 
BABBLES...........1
And babbles thorough silence, till her wits Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 948
 
BABBLING..........2
Babbling so wildly of its lovely daughters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 42
But why do I stand babbling to myself? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 14
 
BABE..............2
Shall the dear babe , upon its mother's breast, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 102
Like an own babe I nurse thee on my breast: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 281
 
BABES.............1
Moan, Cybele, moan, for thy pernicious babes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 425
 
BABY..............2
I was a prince - a baby prince - my doom When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 30
Could agonize me more than baby -words Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 314
 
BABY'S............1
Little baby's There was a naughty boy, Line 84
 
BABYLON...........2
Like thunder clouds that spake to Babylon , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 20
Memphis, and Babylon , and Nineveh. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 849
 
BACCHANAL.........1
With a Bacchanal blush, Spirit here that reignest, Line 19
 
BACCHUS...........13
Of Bacchus from his chariot, when his eye Sleep and Poetry, Line 335
'Twas Bacchus and his crew! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 196
'Twas Bacchus and his kin! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 199
"Within his car, aloft, young Bacchus stood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 209
' We follow Bacchus ! Bacchus on the wing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 222
' We follow Bacchus! Bacchus on the wing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 222
Bacchus , young Bacchus! good or ill betide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 224
Bacchus, young Bacchus ! good or ill betide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 224
For wine we follow Bacchus through the earth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 235
And, save when Bacchus kept his ivy tent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 240
Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 32
Or where God Bacchus drains his cups divine, Lamia, Part I, Line 209
Soon was God Bacchus at meridian height; Lamia, Part II, Line 213
 
BACCHUS'..........2
Before young Bacchus' eye-wink turning pale.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 267
The purple slaughter-house, where Bacchus' self Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 125
 
BACK..............51
And on his back a fay reclined voluptuously. Imitation of Spenser, Line 18
Fain would I echo back each pleasant note To George Felton Mathew, Line 13
Mount his back ! thy sword unsheath! Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 61
And echo back the voice of thine own tongue? Sleep and Poetry, Line 52
Some looking back , and some with upward gaze; Sleep and Poetry, Line 147
With hands held back , and motionless, amaz'd I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 232
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark-grey hood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
So reaching back to boy-hood: make me ships Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 881
His paces back into the temple's chief; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 298
Down whose green back the short-liv'd foam, all hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 349
Of thron'd Apollo, could breathe back the lyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 362
Keep back thine influence, and do not blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 182
Thou art the man!" Endymion started back Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 255
Me back to Scylla o'er the billows rude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 462
To usher back his spirit into life: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1015
Each with large dark blue wings upon his back . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 344
Good bye! I'll soon be back ."- "Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
But to throw back at times her veiling hair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 376
And when she left, she hurried back , as swift Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 469
Tight at 's back There was a naughty boy, Line 19
And rub your flinty back against it - budge! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 50
His flinty back , and I shall kiss and snub Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 66
And back returneth, meagre, barefoot, wan, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 12
With hair blown back , and wings put cross-wise on their breasts. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 36
And back retir'd, not cool'd by high disdain; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 61
His poor guide hurried back with agues in her brain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 189
Had come to mock behind her back , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 87
To toll me back from thee to my sole self! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 72
Yet stay,- perhaps a charm may call you back , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 84
Fall back ! Away there! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Other voices, Line 84a
(advancing from the back of the stage, whither he had Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
The province to invite your Highness back Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 126
When to the stream she launches, looks not back Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 102
That, unless heaven would send me back my son, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 28
Wilt thou creep dastardly behind his back , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 246
And in thy teeth I give thee back the lie! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 104
I hasten'd back , your grieving messenger, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 117
The caitiff of the cold steel at his back . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 15
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies, Knights, Gentlemen, etc., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
And of that other ridge whose barren back Lamia, Part I, Line 177
Lycius, look back ! and be some pity shown." Lamia, Part I, Line 246
"Leave thee alone! Look back ! Ah, Goddess, see Lamia, Part I, Line 257
They held me back , with a benignant light, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 265
On, fellow soldiers! Earl of Redvers, back ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 34
Close at your back , that sly old Crafticant? The Jealousies, Line 49
Or a sharp needle run into her back an inch. The Jealousies, Line 72
Whose glass once up can never be got back , The Jealousies, Line 232
Elfinan's back was turn'd, but, ne'ertheless, The Jealousies, Line 335
It was too much. He shrunk back in his chair, The Jealousies, Line 456
Back to your palace, where I wait for guerdon fit." The Jealousies, Line 522
"A poet, mounted on the court-clown's back , The Jealousies, Line 775
 
BACKBITING........1
Backbiting all the world in ev'ry page; The Jealousies, Line 95
 
BACKS.............3
Hung swollen at their backs , and jewel'd sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 313
Bearing upon their scaly backs , in files, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 246
Fly, cowards, fly! Glocester is at your backs ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 9
 
BACKWARD..........5
Into some backward corner of the brain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 11
In backward yawns. But all were soon alive: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 510
A thousand years with backward glance sublime? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 329
With backward footing through the shade a space: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 154
"He always comes down backward , with one shoe"- The Jealousies, Line 304
 
BACKWARDS.........3
The slave retreated backwards , humble-eyed, The Jealousies, Line 203
As backwards as he can,- is't something new? The Jealousies, Line 302
Backwards and downwards from his own two pair: The Jealousies, Line 310
 
BAD...............12
For others, good or bad , hatred and tears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 4
Take refuge.- Of bad lines a centaine dose Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 112
You vext with bad revolt? Was't opium, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 34
Thou bitter mischief! Venemous bad priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 76
With more bad bitter grain, too difficult Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 175
A noon-day proof of bad Auranthe's guilt. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 191
And careless hectorers in proud bad verse. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 208
Bad reasons for her sorrow, as appears The Jealousies, Line 85
Love thwarted in bad temper oft has vent: The Jealousies, Line 176
"Mr. Nisby is of opinion that laced coffee is bad The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 365
"The Emperor's horrid bad ; yes, that's my cue!" The Jealousies, Line 622
Bad omen - this new match can't be a happy one. The Jealousies, Line 657
 
BADE..............10
Cathedrals call'd. He bade a loth farewel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 626
Glad was the hour, when, with thee, myriads bade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 32
I bade good-morrow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 174
And bade the sun farewell, and joy'd his fill. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 80
And what the friars bade him bring, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 87
Their lips touch'd not, but had not bade adieu, Ode to Psyche, Line 17
They bade me stop. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 5a
I took compassion on her, bade her steep Lamia, Part I, Line 106
Therefore he call'd a coach, and bade it drive amain. The Jealousies, Line 225
And bade the coachman wheel to such a street, The Jealousies, Line 254
 
BAFFLED...........3
But, curb'd and baffled , he began O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 69
When lulled Argus, baffled , swoon'd and slept, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 2
With flowers, and stirring shades, and baffled beams: Ode on Indolence, Line 44
 
BAG...............6
Shewing tooth, tusk, and venom- bag , and sting! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 502
First the soft bag -pipe mourn'd with zealous haste; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 5
Sigh'd; rueful again the piteous bag -pipe went; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 7
O bag -pipe, thou didst steal my heart away; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 9
O bag -pipe, thou didst reassert thy sway; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 11
Powder'd bag -wigs and ruffy-tuffy heads The Jealousies, Line 770
 
BAGS..............1
How could these money- bags see east and west?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 142
 
BAIAE.............1
As thou wast hymned on the shores of Baiae ? Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 3
 
BAIAE'S...........1
Who had on Baiae's shore reclin'd at ease, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 29
 
BAKEN.............1
Spitting, from forth its sulphur- baken peak, The Jealousies, Line 662
 
BALANCED..........1
Balanced upon his grey-grown pinions twain, The Jealousies, Line 581
 
BALANCES..........3
Its rocky marge, and balances once more Sleep and Poetry, Line 378
That balances the heavy meteor-stone;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 644
Even as a miser balances his coin; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
 
BALD..............4
To do an honor to your old bald pate Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 3
Of you my brain will split! Bald sorcerer! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 204
With curl'd gray beard, sharp eyes, and smooth bald crown, Lamia, Part I, Line 364
And pledge him. The bald -head philosopher Lamia, Part II, Line 245
 
BALDPATE..........2
Ungrateful baldpate , have I not disdain'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 11
That the jealous, the jealous old baldpate may hear, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 3
 
BALDRIC...........1
Furbish his jingling baldric while he sleeps, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 82
 
BALDWIN...........4
EARL BALDWIN DE REDVERS King Stephen 4
[Enter EARL BALDWIN , and Soldiers, as defeated. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 19b
Baldwin ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 21a
He must by this have fallen. Baldwin is taken; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 16
 
BALE..............2
Of young Narcissus, and sad Echo's bale . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 180
We miscal grief, bale , sorrow, heartbreak, woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 942
 
BALK..............2
The city of Balk - 'twas Balk beyond all doubt: The Jealousies, Line 679
The city of Balk- 'twas Balk beyond all doubt: The Jealousies, Line 679
 
BALK'D............1
They ne'er were balk'd of; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 88
 
BALL..............4
He fell a snoring at a faery ball . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 35
My soul for foot- ball at hell's holiday! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 30
This little ball of earth, and chuck it them Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 24
As blow- ball from the mead? To Fanny, Line 40
 
BALLAD............1
And then the ballad of his sad life closes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 735
 
BALLANCING........1
Stare at the grandeur of the ballancing ? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 30
 
BALLOONS..........1
Its light balloons into the summer air; Character of C.B., Line 5
 
BALM..............8
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 5
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 29
O sovereign power of love! O grief! O balm ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1
A dewy balm upon them!- fear no more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 983
With fennel green, and balm , and golden pines, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 575
Cut by an Indian for its juicy balm . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 448
Receive the truth, and let it be your balm ." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 243
The one pours out a balm upon the world, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 201
 
BALMIEST..........1
And with the balmiest leaves his temples bind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 382
 
BALMY.............6
And on the balmy zephyrs tranquil rest Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 3
Full of sweet desolation - balmy pain. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 162
Heal'd up the wound, and, with a balmy power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 483
Shed balmy consciousness within that bower. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 466
So that it smelt more balmy than its peers Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 427
Paining with eloquence her balmy side; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 205
 
BALUSTRADE........4
And, at the last, a diamond balustrade , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 597
Into the sun-rise, o'er the balustrade Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 178
Her falt'ring hand upon the balustrade , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 190
And marble balustrade , and patient travail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 91
 
BAM...............1
Just as it happen'd, true or else a bam ! The Jealousies, Line 398
 
BAN...............1
Turn them aside, wretch! or the righteous ban Lamia, Part II, Line 278
 
BAND..............4
The Passions - a terrific band - Ode to Apollo, Line 26
On abject Caesars - not the stoutest band To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 12
A flowery band to bind us to the earth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 7
He blows a bugle,- an ethereal band Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 420
 
BANDIT'S..........1
Fair Pastorella in the bandit's den, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 32
 
BANDS.............4
Thus spake he: "Men of Latmos! shepherd bands ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 196
Onward it flies. From languor's sullen bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 66
"Endymion! Ah! still wandering in the bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 903
And 'scape at once from Hope's accursed bands ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 230
 
BANE..............5
Bane of every wicked spell; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 63
But off, Despondence! miserable bane ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 281
My own dear will, 'twould be a deadly bane . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 960
That love should be my bane ! Ah, Scylla fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 399
Wolf's- bane , tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 2
 
BANISH............3
To banish Woman from my mind. Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 4
To banish Even from her sky. Fancy, Line 24
To banish thoughts of that most hateful land, What can I do to drive away, Line 31
 
BANISH'D..........2
Yet there was not a breath of wind: she banish'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 532
Built by a banish'd santon of Chaldee: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 42
 
BANISHMENT........4
And soon, returning from love's banishment , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 525
With blood upon their heads, to banishment . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 480
And cloud him in such utter banishment , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 72
A lenient banishment ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 82b
 
BANK..............4
And on the bank a lonely flower he spied, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 171
Pointed its beak over the fringed bank ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 424
And a bank for the wasp to hive in. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 30
Cast on sunny bank its skin; Fancy, Line 58
 
BANKRUPT..........1
A poor court- bankrupt , outwitted and lost, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
 
BANKS.............3
That lean against a streamlet's rushy banks , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 62
And ivy banks ; all leading pleasantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 81
Gurgles through straiten'd banks , and still doth fan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 211
 
BANNER............1
I by the banner of Saint Maurice swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 51
 
BANNERAL..........1
Beneath the shade of stately banneral , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 38
 
BANNERS...........2
and Attendants. The Soldiers halt at the gate, with banners in sight. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
Lest our rent banners , too o' the sudden shown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 3
 
BANQUET...........6
The banquet of my arms, my arbour queen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 498
Just fresh from the banquet of Comus! Spirit here that reignest, Line 20
Sits in the banquet -room among his chiefs; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 62
The glowing banquet -room shone with wide-arched grace. Lamia, Part II, Line 121
Of wealthy lustre was the banquet -room, Lamia, Part II, Line 173
To grace a banquet . The high city gates King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 26
 
BANQUETING........1
Thrice emptied could pour forth, at banqueting The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 36
 
BANQUETS..........1
This coming night of banquets must not light Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
 
BANQUETTING.......2
Will you return, Prince, to our banquetting ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 152
A Banquetting Hall, brilliantly illuminated, and set forth with all Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
BANTER............1
You well may laugh and banter . What a fool Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 40
 
BAPTIS'D..........1
Baptis'd her in the bosom of the church, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 132
 
BAR...............4
There they discours'd upon the fragile bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 360
In other regions, past the scanty bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 124
Would bar return and make a man forget his mortal way. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 32
Say you are very sick, and bar the way The Jealousies, Line 535
 
BAR'D.............1
Though now 'tis tatter'd; leaving my bark bar'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 773
 
BARB..............1
Of circumstance; yea, seize the arrow's barb Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 344
 
BARBARIAN.........2
For him, those chambers held barbarian hordes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 85
Foul barbarian , cease; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 72b
 
BARBARISM.........1
Nurtured by foppery and barbarism , Sleep and Poetry, Line 182
 
BARBED............2
But she was gone. Whereat the barbed shafts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 480
A serpent's plashy neck; its barbed tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 45
 
BARBER............1
Our barber tells me too are on the rise,- The Jealousies, Line 293
 
BARD..............6
Therefore, great bard , I not so fearfully Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 55
These are the living pleasures of the bard : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 67
What first inspired a bard of old to sing I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 163
No higher bard than simple maidenhood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 726
Bard art thou completely! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 48
Bard art thou completely!- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 51
 
BARD'S............1
To find a bard's low cradle place about the silent north. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 28
 
BARDS.............10
Bards , that erst sublimely told Ode to Apollo, Line 3
From thee, great God of Bards , receive their heavenly birth. Ode to Apollo, Line 47
How many bards gild the lapses of time! How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 1
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold. On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 4
The glorious features of the bards who sung Sleep and Poetry, Line 356
Of the old bards to mighty deeds: his plans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 895
By bards who died content in pleasant sward, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 7
Bards of passion and of mirth, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 1
Bards of passion and of mirth, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 37
Ye love-sick bards , repay her scorn for scorn; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 11
 
BARE..............18
And the bare heath of life presents no bloom; To Hope, Line 4
With forehead to the soothing breezes bare , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 56
To take him to a desert rude, and bare , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 28
O may no wintry season, bare and hoary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 54
A chieftain king's: beneath his breast, half bare , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 172
And panting bosoms bare ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 985
Let thy white shoulders silvery and bare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 587
Bare your faces of the veil, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 25
To make all bare before he dares to stray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 254
O put it to her buttocks bare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 11
That man may never lose his mind on mountains bleak and bare ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 46
On the marble cold and bare , Not Aladdin magian, Line 12
Naked and bare of its great diadem, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 101
With my bare unlidded eyes. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 85
Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare ; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 16
Fallen in jealous curls about his shoulders bare . Lamia, Part I, Line 26
But bare of laurel they live, dream, and die; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 7
And grape stalks but half bare , and remnants more, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 33
 
BARED.............2
Bared its eternal bosom, and the dew Sleep and Poetry, Line 190
Have bared their operations to this globe- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 35
 
BAREFOOT..........1
And back returneth, meagre, barefoot , wan, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 12
 
BARES.............1
He bares his forehead to the cool blue sky, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 6
 
BARK..............6
Though now 'tis tatter'd; leaving my bark bar'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 773
Some holy bark let forth an anthem sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 81
And on the very bark 'gainst which he leant Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 787
The seal on the cold ice with piteous bark Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 116
And rubb'd his sides against the mossed bark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 85
He will be cur enough to bark at me; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 41
 
BARLEY............2
All spread upon barley bread For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 6
My pulse is warm with thine old barley -bree, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 5
 
BARN..............1
And thou shalt feed them from the squirrel's barn . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 694
 
BAROMETER.........1
For, by my choicest best barometer , The Jealousies, Line 435
 
BARON.............1
That night the Baron dreamt of many a woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 372
 
BARR'D............1
Eyed like a peacock, and all crimson barr'd ; Lamia, Part I, Line 50
 
BARRED............1
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day, To Autumn, Line 25
 
BARREL............1
With my new double- barrel - stew'd the thighs, The Jealousies, Line 650
 
BARREL'S..........1
When the barrel's set abroach, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 9
 
BARREN............11
And wither drearily on barren moors: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 287
Not native in such barren vaults. Give ear! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 935
On barren souls. Great Muse, thou know'st what prison, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 20
Let me not wander in a barren dream: On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 12
'Tis ignorance that makes a barren waste To the Nile, Line 10
In silent barren synod met O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 1
Space region'd with life-air; and barren void; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 119
Untun'd, and harsh, and barren of all love. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 132
Peers with disrelish, grey, barren , and cold! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
And of that other ridge whose barren back Lamia, Part I, Line 177
Whose language is to thee a barren noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 5
 
BARRIER...........2
Behind a barrier of engender'd guilt! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 95
A barrier of guilt! I was the fool, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 104
 
BARS..............4
On earth the good man base detraction bars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 13
Ah! surely he had burst our mortal bars ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 190
That tend thy bidding, I do think the bars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 185
Made gloom of all her frecklings, streaks and bars , Lamia, Part I, Line 159
 
BARTER'D..........1
Now all my empire, barter'd for one feast, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 31
 
BARTHOLOMEW.......1
Coming down stairs,- by St. Bartholomew ! The Jealousies, Line 301
 
BARTON............1
There's the barton rich For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 25
 
BASE..............4
On earth the good man base detraction bars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 13
With the base purple of a court oppress'd, To Hope, Line 39
My thirst for the world's praises: nothing base , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 770
Because I hold those base weeds with tight hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
 
BASED.............1
For my firm- based footstool:- Ah, infirm! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 138
 
BASEMENT..........1
I know how the great basement of all power Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 175
 
BASEMENTS.........1
And from the basements deep to the high towers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 223
 
BASHFUL...........1
And turned to smile upon thy bashful eyes, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 213
 
BASIL.............13
Cool parsley, basil sweet, and sunny thyme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 577
Sweet basil , which her tears kept ever wet. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 416
Hung over her sweet basil evermore, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 423
Of basil -tufts in Florence; for it drew Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 428
Why she sat drooping by the basil green, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 458
Beside her basil , weeping through her hair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 472
Yet they contriv'd to steal the basil -pot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 473
Now they have ta'en away her basil sweet. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 488
Asking for her lost basil amorously; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 490
To ask him where her basil was; and why Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 494
"To steal my basil -pot away from me." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 496
Imploring for her basil to the last. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 498
To steal my basil -pot away from me!" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 504
 
BASILIC...........1
Of our Imperial Basilic ; a row The Jealousies, Line 751
 
BASKET............4
And in his left he held a basket full Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 155
And from a basket emptied to the rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 510
And what have ye there i' the basket ? Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 2
I'll put your basket all safe in a nook Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 13
 
BASKETS...........5
In woven baskets bringing ears of corn, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 6
Your baskets high Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 574
On golden dishes and in baskets bright The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 272
At Venus' temple porch, 'mid baskets heap'd Lamia, Part I, Line 317
In baskets of bright osier'd gold were brought Lamia, Part II, Line 217
 
BASTION'D.........2
Bastion'd with pyramids of glowing gold, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 177
Bastion'd with pyramids of glowing gold, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 25
 
BAT...............2
Ere a lean bat could plump its wintery skin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 377
Some strange Imaian custom. A large bat The Jealousies, Line 674
 
BAT'S.............1
Like a bat's , still wandering, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 8
 
BATE..............1
And now am sitting on you just to bate , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 4
 
BATES.............2
My shoemaker was always Mr. Bates . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 18
And if not Mr. Bates , why I'm not old! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 19
 
BATH'S............1
At the bath's edge, and keeps a gentle motion Sleep and Poetry, Line 375
 
BATHE.............3
Thou wouldst bathe once again. Innocent maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 978
I will bathe myself with thee, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 43
Fast by the springs where she to bathe was wont, Lamia, Part I, Line 17
 
BATHES............1
She plucks the fruit unseen, she bathes unseen: Lamia, Part I, Line 99
 
BATHING...........2
Bathing my spirit in a new delight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 902
His weary limbs, bathing an hour's space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 836
 
BATS..............1
Before he went to live with owls and bats , Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 1
 
BATTAILOUS........1
Of honour battailous ! I could not turn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 90
 
BATTALIONS........1
Of all our slain battalions . Sire, reflect, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 125
 
BATTER'D..........1
O'erwhelm'd, and spurn'd, and batter'd , ye are here! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 156
 
BATTLE............12
Where long ago a giant battle was; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 792
Battle to the swollen billow-ridge, and drave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 612
Has legion'd all his battle ; and behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 729
"Under the flag/ Of each his faction, they to battle bring/ Their Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Epigraph
Where patriot battle has been fought, when glory had the gain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 2
What tidings of the battle ? Albert? Ludolph? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 19
That, after such a merry battle fought, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 14
Field of Battle . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Setting
While the wide din of battle dies away King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 3
His gleaming battle axe being slaughter sick, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 38
The field of Battle . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Setting
Nor till fit time against her fame wage battle . The Jealousies, Line 120
 
BATTLE'S..........1
Spread deeper crimson than the battle's toil, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 2
 
BATTLEMENT........1
From the worn top of some old battlement Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 15
 
BATTLEMENTS.......3
Love's standard on the battlements of song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 41
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 200
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 44
 
BAY...............5
But there are times, when those that love the bay , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 19
More lovely than a wreath from the bay tree? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 2
Bay leaves were crackling in the fragrant pile, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 228
And my boat danc'd in every creek and bay ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 319
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 12
 
BAYLE'S...........1
from Bayle's Dictionary, and had copied a long Latin note from that work. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
BAYS..............2
Of flowering bays , that I may die a death Sleep and Poetry, Line 58
Where thou didst dream alone on budded bays , This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 3
 
BE'T..............1
This is a brag,- be't so,- but if I fall, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 32
 
BEACH.............1
Would strew sweet flowers on a sterile beach . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 371
 
BEACON............1
A heavenly beacon in their dreary woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 354
 
BEAD..............3
Free from the smallest pebble- bead of doubt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 149
'Mid bead and spangle, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 46
And, ere one lively bead could burst and flit, The Jealousies, Line 419
 
BEADED............1
With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 17
 
BEADING...........1
A clammy dew is beading on my brow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 568
 
BEADS.............4
To taste the gentle moon, and freshening beads , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 110
Like pearl beads dropping sudden from their string: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 284
To girth my saddle! And those devil's beads Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
Fetch me a missal, and a string of beads ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
 
BEADSMAN..........2
That ancient Beadsman heard the prelude soft; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 28
The Beadsman , after thousand aves told, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 377
 
BEADSMAN'S........1
Numb were the Beadsman's fingers, while he told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 5
 
BEAGLES...........1
He flies, for the Welch beagles to hunt down. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 18
 
BEAK..............1
Pointed its beak over the fringed bank; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 424
 
BEAKER............1
O for a beaker full of the warm South, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 15
 
BEAKS.............1
Of gone sea-warriors; brazen beaks and targe; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 124
 
BEAM..............15
Of starry beam , and gloriously bedight, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 7
And in the last sun- beam the sylph lightly swims. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 8
Just when the sun his farewell beam has darted: To George Felton Mathew, Line 16
Or a rapt seraph in a moonlight beam ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 24
To meet her glorious brother's greeting beam . To George Felton Mathew, Line 83
So silently, it seems a beam of light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 4
Young Daniel, who did straightway pluck the beam Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 6
That needs must die, although its little beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 676
Glance but one little beam of temper'd light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 172
And if I guess'd not so, the sunny beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 577
Hurry distracted from Sol's temperate beam , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1003
A moon- beam to the deep, deep water-world, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 101
Though saphire warm, their stars do never beam ; On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 7
On ceiling beam and old oak chair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 75
At half-past four the morn essay'd to beam - The Jealousies, Line 708
 
BEAM'D............2
Beam'd upward from the vallies of the east: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 727
But in blank splendor beam'd like the mild moon, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 269
 
BEAMILY...........1
With a bright halo, shining beamily ; To Lord Byron, Line 8
 
BEAMINESS.........1
The beaminess of those bright eyes- Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 15
 
BEAMING...........1
I see in thy mute beauty beaming forth! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
 
BEAMS.............10
Peep with the moon- beams through the leafy roof, To Hope, Line 11
When it flutters in sun- beams that shine through a fountain? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 4
And the west is resplendently cloathed in beams . O come, dearest Emma!, Line 4
The morning sun- beams to the great Apollo Sleep and Poetry, Line 60
To taste the luxury of sunny beams I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 74
Its beams against the zodiac-lion cast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 553
Collecting, mimick'd the wrought oaken beams , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 623
And the beams of still Vesper, when winds are all whist, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 98
With flowers, and stirring shades, and baffled beams : Ode on Indolence, Line 44
Yet could my eyes drink up intenser beams Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 42
 
BEAMY.............2
Responsive to sylphs, in the moon beamy air. To Some Ladies, Line 12
A sun- beamy tale of a wreath, and a chain; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 22
 
BEAN..............1
Of bean blossoms, in heaven freshly shed. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 96
 
BEANS.............1
Their fairest blossom'd beans and poppied corn; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 255
 
BEAR..............27
Like a fresh sacrifice; or, if I can bear Sleep and Poetry, Line 61
And, like a muddy stream, would bear along Sleep and Poetry, Line 158
No - none of these can from my favorite bear To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 12
Bear up against it: so farewel, sad sigh; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 974
No sight can bear the lightning of his bow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 538
Thou madest Pluto bear thin element; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 99
Until 'twas too fierce agony to bear ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 410
He could not bear it - shut his eyes in vain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1008
Warm mountaineer! for canst thou only bear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 54
And of the Bear has Pollux mastery: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 592
The Lion's mane's on end: the Bear how fierce! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 596
Thou surely canst not bear a mind in pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 811
What ails thee?" He could bear no more, and so Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 846
And a sigh for I can't bear it! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 18
Through sights I scarce can bear ; God of the meridian, Line 19
O folly! for to bear all naked truths, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 203
Albert, go thou and bear him company. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 156
[Attendants bear off AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 74a
Silence! Gag up their mouths! I cannot bear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 261
Conrad, hold! I would not bear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 59b
How shall I bear my life till Albert comes? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
I will see more. Bear you so stout a heart? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 17
Bear a soft message for me; for the hour Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 129
That soldiers may bear witness how my arm King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 28
With clamourous trumpets. To the Empress bear King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 53
A child's soul through the sapphired canvas bear , The Jealousies, Line 38
Quiet and plodding, thou dost bear no grudge The Jealousies, Line 250
 
BEARD.............11
For, bless my beard , they aye shall be Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 5
Immortal tear-drops down the thunderer's beard ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 476
And beard them, though they be more fang'd than wolves and bears." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 153
Thereto his beard had not begun to bloom, Character of C.B., Line 6
As with a palsied tongue, and while his beard Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 93
To beard us for no cause; he's not the man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
With curl'd gray beard , sharp eyes, and smooth bald crown, Lamia, Part I, Line 364
Corinthians! look upon that gray- beard wretch! Lamia, Part II, Line 287
Trembled amid the white curls of his beard . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 451
To rule in Pylos with a Nestor's beard . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 12
With his best beard and brimstone, to explore The Jealousies, Line 287
 
BEAREST...........1
Thou bearest me along God of the meridian, Line 18
 
BEARING...........13
Bearing the burden of a shepherd song; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 136
All human; bearing in themselves this good, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 156
Bearing upon their scaly backs, in files, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 246
Past the eyesight's bearing - 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 37
And in her bearing was a sort of hope, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 148
If I may judge by his so tragic bearing , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 89
Bearing with me a weight of benefits Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 138
Methinks by his stout bearing he should be- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 15
Bearing a fruit more precious! graceful thing, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 83
Bearing more woe than all his sins deserve. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 176
"By thy ungallant bearing and sad mien, The Jealousies, Line 244
While the torch- bearing slaves a halloo sent The Jealousies, Line 392
Then slaves, as presents bearing many a gem; The Jealousies, Line 588
 
BEARS.............5
When pleasure's tree no longer bears , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 22
That bone, fie on't, bears just the shape O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 81
And beard them, though they be more fang'd than wolves and bears ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 153
In feud with wolves and bears , when no eye saw Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 10
Bears his flaunt standard close upon their rear. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, First Knight, Line 13
 
BEAST.............3
Of beast , behemoth, and leviathon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 134
Sir, Convent Garden is a monstrous beast ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 9
To hide themselves in forms of beast and bird. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 72
 
BEASTS............2
His beasts to trouble the enchanted spring: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 64
Of men, and beasts , and fish, and apes, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 14
 
BEAT..............17
Had she but known how beat my heart Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 21
Would often beat its wings, and often too Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 87
How he does love me! His poor temples beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 764
The lady's heart beat quick, and he could see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 99
Shall we away?" He rous'd the steeds: they beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 481
Woe-hurricanes beat ever at the gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 527
His heart beat awfully against his side; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 42
And his garments white did beat Not Aladdin magian, Line 14
'Tis dark: the iced gusts still rave and beat : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 327
Nor did he know each aged watchman's beat , Character of C.B., Line 24
Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 1
I must be there, while her young pulses beat Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 110
The eagle Otho to beat off assault. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
Loves to beat up against a tyrannous blast, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 30
Not twenty Earls of Chester shall brow- beat King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 35
"Don't beat him!" return'd Hum, and on the floor came pat. The Jealousies, Line 315
"Those wings to Canterbury you must beat , The Jealousies, Line 498
 
BEATING...........4
With both our hearts a beating . Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 12
Try'd to look unconcern'd with beating heart. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 44
Is beating with a child's anxiety, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 23
Brow- beating her fair form, and troubling her sweet pride. Lamia, Part II, Line 248
 
BEATS.............5
Onward he goes - he stops - his bosom beats Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 355
Forgotten is the worldly heart - alone, it beats in vain. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 24
Where beats the human heart, as if just there, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 43
Where beats the human heart; as if just there, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 345
Where the heart beats : confess - 'tis nothing new- To Fanny, Line 35
 
BEAUTEOUS.........12
There, beauteous Emma, I'll sit at thy feet, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 11
In beauteous vassalage, look up and wait. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 212
Appear'd, and, stepping to a beauteous corse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 778
So fond, so beauteous was his bed-fellow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 448
Or like a beauteous woman's large blue eyes Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 53
She smil'd at her own beauteous face again. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 54
Manifestations of that beauteous life Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 317
Found ourselves ruling new and beauteous realms. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 201
To any one particular beauteous star, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 100
Of such a beauteous vestal. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 89a
Thou beauteous wreath, with melancholy eyes, Lamia, Part I, Line 84
"Ah, beauteous mortal!" "Hush!" quoth Coralline, The Jealousies, Line 64
 
BEAUTIES..........6
With those beauties , scarce discern'd, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 26
Beauties of deeper glance, and hear their singing, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 13
Over their beauties , earthly, or sublime: How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 4
Beauties that the earth hath lost; Fancy, Line 30
And couch supine their beauties , lily white; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 52
A splendid company! rare beauties here! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 22
 
BEAUTIFUL.........18
More strange, more beautiful , more smooth, more regal, Sleep and Poetry, Line 21
I hope I have not in too late a day touched the beautiful Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
But in old marbles ever beautiful . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 319
How beautiful thou art! The world how deep! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 188
And more of beautiful and strange beside: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 391
My spirit struck from all the beautiful ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 171
Thus went that beautiful multitude, nor far, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 818
Come hand in hand with one so beautiful . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 812
Whence thick, and green, and beautiful it grew, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 426
Though beautiful , cold - strange - as in a dream On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 3
How beautiful , if sorrow had not made Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 35
Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty's self. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 36
Beautiful things made new, for the surprise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 132
In form and shape compact and beautiful , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 209
Full beautiful , a fairy's child; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 14
More beautiful than ever twisted braid, Lamia, Part I, Line 186
Beautiful slaves, and Lamia's self, appear, Lamia, Part II, Line 208
Beautiful things made new for the surprize The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 437
 
BEAUTIFULLEST.....1
Say, beautifullest , shall I never think? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 305
 
BEAUTIFULLY.......1
And when a tale is beautifully staid, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 129
 
BEAUTY............68
"What wondrous beauty ! From this moment I efface from my mind all Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
One's thoughts from such a beauty ; when I hear Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 37
To feel the beauty of a silent eve, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 3
Nature's clear beauty , could pass lightly by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 30
And scales upon the beauty of its wings. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 37
A fragrant wild, with Nature's beauty drest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 7
Of whitest clouds she does her beauty dress, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 60
You too upheld the veil from Clio's beauty , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 68
Vistas of solemn beauty , where I'd wander Sleep and Poetry, Line 73
The morning precious: beauty was awake! Sleep and Poetry, Line 192
Drooping its beauty o'er the watery clearness, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 173
Wept that such beauty should be desolate: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 202
Untouch'd, a victim of your beauty bright- On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 6
A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 1
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 12
Vesper, the beauty -crest of summer weather; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 363
Too keen in beauty , for thy silver prow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 181
Of fondest beauty ; fonder, in fair sooth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 394
Where all that beauty snar'd me."- Cruel god, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 952
Such utmost beauty ? Alas, thou dost pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 74
Strange journeyings! Wherever beauty dwells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 93
Yet deign, white Queen of Beauty , thy fair eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 976
And so he groan'd, as one by beauty slain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 98
Awhile forgetful of all beauty save Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 450
This beauty in its birth - Despair! despair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 506
But with thy beauty will I deaden it. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 631
That I may see thy beauty through the night; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 705
Beauty , in things on earth and things above; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 21
After some beauty veiled far-away, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 4
Takes in all beauty with an easy span: Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 4
Her beauty farther than the falcon spies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 20
By gradual decay from beauty fell, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 256
Thy beauty grows upon me, and I feel Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 319
Of youth and beauty should be thrown aside Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 455
All is cold beauty ; pain is never done On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 8
The real of beauty , free from that dead hue On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 10
She took their cream of beauty , fairest dyes, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 3
Love pour'd her beauty into my warm veins. Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 12
That he might see her beauty unespied, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 166
Verse, fame, and beauty are intense indeed, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 13
The more the beauty , the more fortune too: When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 59
Beauty before the wide world never knew- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 60
A power more strong in beauty , born of us Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 213
Above us in their beauty , and must reign Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 227
That first in beauty should be first in might: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 229
With such a glow of beauty in his eyes, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 237
Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 29
" Beauty is truth, truth beauty," - that is all Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 49
"Beauty is truth, truth beauty ," - that is all Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 49
She dwells with Beauty - Beauty that must die; Ode on Melancholy, Line 21
She dwells with Beauty - Beauty that must die; Ode on Melancholy, Line 21
Such beauty once again.- What ails you, lady? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 13
I see in thy mute beauty beaming forth! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
Soft beauty ! by to-morrow I should die, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13
Comes from the pillow'd beauty of that fair Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 35
"Of personal beauty and untainted soul"? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 22
That the extremest beauty of the world Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 93
And by my power is her beauty veil'd Lamia, Part I, Line 100
Dash'd by the wood-nymph's beauty , so he burn'd; Lamia, Part I, Line 130
A full-born beauty new and exquisite? Lamia, Part I, Line 172
And soon his eyes had drunk her beauty up, Lamia, Part I, Line 251
Happy in beauty , life, and love, and every thing, Lamia, Part I, Line 298
With no more awe than what her beauty gave, Lamia, Part I, Line 338
Full on the alarmed beauty of the bride, Lamia, Part II, Line 247
Faded the sight of beauty from my eyes, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 6
Faded the shape of beauty from my arms, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 7
To-night, if I may guess, thy beauty wears To Fanny, Line 11
Of a fit mould and beauty , ripe and rare, The Jealousies, Line 7
 
BEAUTY'S..........8
That the bright glance from beauty's eyelids slanting To My Brother George (epistle), Line 15
From silv'ry ripple, up to beauty's queen; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 39
Silent entangler of a beauty's tresses! Sleep and Poetry, Line 15
His left sat smiling Beauty's paragon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 865
Yet if thou wilt behold all beauty's store, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 58
Since I was tangled in thy beauty's web, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 3
Thy beauty's shield, heart-shap'd and vermeil dyed? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 336
Sorrow more beautiful than Beauty's self. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 36
 
BEAVER............1
That ye may love in spite of beaver hats. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 17
 
BECAME............5
For wrath became stiffened; the sound God of the golden bow, Line 16
The which became more strange, and strange, and dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 570
I became loth and fearful to alight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 583
Met palsy half way: soon these limbs became Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 637
Was't to this end I louted and became Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 17
 
BECAUSE...........24
Because my thoughts were never free, and clear, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 23
Because my wine was of too poor a savour To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 25
And so remain, because thou listenest: To G.A.W., Line 10
My pleasant days, because I could not mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 746
My hunting cap, because I laugh'd and smil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 925
Because I lov'd her?- Cold, O cold indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 623
Because into his depth Cimmerian Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 375
Because he knew not whither he was going. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 551
Because I feel my forehead hot and flush'd- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 34
Because her face was turn'd to the same skies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 22
Why were they proud? Because their marble founts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 121
Why were they proud? Because fair orange-mounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 123
Why were they proud? Because red-lin'd accounts Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 125
Because of some great urgency and need Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 227
Because Lorenzo came not, Oftentimes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 257
Scanty the hour and few the steps, because a longer stay There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 31
Dead; and because the creature could not spit Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 47
Because it cooeth, and hath snowy wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 222
And ached for wings, because I knew the three: Ode on Indolence, Line 24
Because I cannot flatter with bent knees Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 106
Because some dozen vassals cry'd - my lord! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 78
Because I hold those base weeds with tight hand Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
Because he mused beyond her, knowing well Lamia, Part II, Line 38
Because I think, my lord, he is no man, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 31
 
BECK..............1
When, lackeying my counsel at a beck , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 99
 
BECKON............3
Beckon me sternly from soft "Lydian airs," To George Felton Mathew, Line 18
Beckon me out into the wintry air. To Fanny, Line 8
School'd in a beckon , learned in a nudge, The Jealousies, Line 248
 
BECKON'D..........1
Beckon'd their sons to silence; while each cheek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 188
 
BECKONED..........1
The ooze-born Goddess beckoned and drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 893
 
BECKS.............2
Wherein lies happiness? In that which becks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 777
Nods, becks , and hints, should be obey'd with care, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 32
 
BECOME............7
That whisper round a temple become soon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 27
Haunt us till they become a cheering light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 30
Mingle, and so become a part of it,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 811
Have become indolent; but touching thine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 5
And so become immortal."- Thus the God, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 120
To thy high requiem become a sod. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 60
and papers of yours I have become possessed of. His life is no Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 57
 
BECOMES...........1
Dark paradise! where pale becomes the bloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 538


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Published @ RC

March 2005