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Keats Concordance
 
BED...............33
And when thou art weary, I'll find thee a bed , O come, dearest Emma!, Line 9
Fallen on a bed of snow. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 12
And glides into a bed of water lillies: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 21
E'en now I'm pillow'd on a bed of flowers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 123
As though she were reclining in a bed To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 95
"As I lay in my bed slepe full unmete/ Was unto me, but why that I Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
'Tis a cowslip bed ; Hither, hither, love, Line 6
There blossom'd suddenly a magic bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 554
Over the darkest, lushest blue-bell bed , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 631
Daily, I pluck sweet flowerets from their bed , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 954
Endymion sought around, and shook each bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 94
O think how I should love a bed of flowers!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 330
The smoothest mossy bed and deepest, where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 710
And most forlorn upon that widow'd bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 859
The ceaseless wonders of this ocean- bed . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 392
O state perplexing! On the pinion bed , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 439
So fond, so beauteous was his bed -fellow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 448
Left thee so quiet on this bed of dew? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 624
Those gentle limbs on mossy bed reclin'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 677
Fainting I fell into a bed of flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 746
And make the wild fern for a bed do? Over the hill and over the dale, Line 20
Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 1
Comes from beyond the river to my bed : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 302
And they had found Lorenzo's earthy bed ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 351
Her bed it was the brown heath turf, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 3
As, supperless to bed they must retire, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 51
Young Porphyro, for gazing on that bed ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 197
In fancy, fair St. Agnes in her bed , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 233
Then by the bed -side, where the faded moon The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 253
Around my bed its lulling charities. Sonnet to Sleep, Line 8
I will to bed - To-morrow- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 195
To find where this sweet nymph prepar'd her secret bed : Lamia, Part I, Line 30
To waiting-maids, and bed -room coteries, The Jealousies, Line 119
 
BEDDED............5
The dreary melody of bedded reeds- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 239
And, plashing among bedded pebbles, stuck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 932
Bedded in tongued flames will be. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 92
They lay calm-breathing on the bedded grass; Ode to Psyche, Line 15
My head cool- bedded in the flowery grass; Ode on Indolence, Line 52
 
BEDEW.............1
Of all beyond itself: thou dost bedew To the Nile, Line 11
 
BEDEWING..........1
These pleasant things, and heaven was bedewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 53
 
BEDEWS............1
Its spray that the wild flower kindly bedews . To Some Ladies, Line 8
 
BEDIGHT...........1
Of starry beam, and gloriously bedight , As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 7
 
BEDS..............8
Which, pure from mossy beds , did down distill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 5
And after parting beds of simple flowers, Imitation of Spenser, Line 6
Would be to find where violet beds were nestling, To George Felton Mathew, Line 49
From their fresh beds , and scattered thoughtlessly I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 45
A natural sermon o'er their pebbly beds ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 71
Gurgling in beds of coral: for anon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 640
Streams subterranean tease their granite beds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 602
Of moth's down, to make soft the royal beds , The Jealousies, Line 767
 
BEE...............11
Startles the wild bee from the fox-glove bell. O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 8
And where the bee with cowslip bells was wrestling. To George Felton Mathew, Line 50
Nor will a bee buzz round two swelling peaches, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 66
That the still murmur of the honey bee To My Brother George (epistle), Line 13
Of grass, a wailful gnat, a bee bustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 450
And honeysuckles full of clear bee -wine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 698
For the buzzing bee , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 29
When the bee -hive casts its swarm; Fancy, Line 64
Turning to poison while the bee -mouth sips: Ode on Melancholy, Line 24
Sipp'd by the wander'd bee , the which I took, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 43
Like any drone shut from the fair bee -queen, The Jealousies, Line 132
 
BEECH.............2
And poplars, and lawn-shading palms, and beech , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 25
Palm, myrtle, oak, and sycamore, and beech , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 20
 
BEECHEN...........3
His aged head, crowned with beechen wreath, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 159
To sit beneath a fair lone beechen tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 767
Of beechen green, and shadows numberless, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 9
 
BEECHES...........1
Around me beeches and high chestnuts shed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 300
 
BEEN..............87
That in fairest lake had placed been , Imitation of Spenser, Line 20
In his immortal spirit, been as free Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 3
O what wonders had been told Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 2
Now the Muses had been ten. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 36
Tell me what thou wouldst have been ? Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 43
A little brook. The youth had long been viewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 52
Had been less heartfelt by him than the clang Calidore: A Fragment, Line 75
To one who has been long in city pent, To one who has been long in city pent, Line 1
Must think on what will be, and what has been . To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 8
It has been said, dear George, and true I hold it, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 23
Or known your kindness, what might I have been ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 73
For I have long time been my fancy feeding To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 80
Which, had I felt, these scribblings might have been To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 107
A few of them have ever been the food How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 2
Round many western islands have I been On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 3
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 5
Fresh garlands: for sweet music has been heard Sleep and Poetry, Line 223
In many places;- some has been upstirr'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 224
Where had he been , from whose warm head out-flew I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 181
been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph1
Ah! thou hast been uphappy at the change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 520
Had I been used to pass my weary eves; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 546
Have been content to let occasion die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 822
Once more been tortured with renewed life. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 919
Has he been wandering in uncertain ways: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 48
I've been thy guide; that thou must wander far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 123
A voice, he had been froze to senseless stone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 200
Had more been heard. Thus swell'd it forth: "Descend, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 202
As from thy threshold; day by day hast been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 206
O I do think that I have been alone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 801
In chastity: yes, Pallas has been sighing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 802
Has it been ever sounding for those ears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 840
O love! how potent hast thou been to teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 92
Has been an under-passion to this hour. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 179
I had been grieving at this joyous hour. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 302
Had been my dreary death? Fool! I began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 374
That thou hast been a witness - it must be- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 394
So near, that if no nearer it had been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 447
My waking must have been ! disgust, and hate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 562
Had been resum'd in spite of hindering force- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 650
O they had all been sav'd but crazed eld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 661
Thou, Carian lord, hadst better have been tost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 52
Since to a woe like this I have been led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 90
I've been a ranger Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 274
Have I been able to endure that voice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 299
Or felt but a great dream! O I have been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 638
Has been thy meed for many thousand years; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 777
Fly in the air where his had never been - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 796
Since I saw thee, I have been wide awake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 855
And so remain'd as he a corpse had been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 919
Why, I have been a butterfly, a lord Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 937
As though they jests had been : nor had he done Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 947
Has our delaying been ; but foolish fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 989
Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 1
O thou whose only book has been the light O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 5
And should have been most happy - but I saw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 93
If Isabel's quick eye had not been wed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 51
Ah! better had it been for ever so, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 87
Too many tears for lovers have been shed, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 90
Enchanted has it been the Lord knows where. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 18
Better than Southey it had been , All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 29
Where patriot battle has been fought, when glory had the gain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 2
There is a pleasure on the heath where Druids old have been , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 3
I have been the pontif priest Not Aladdin magian, Line 39
Even so long my sleep has been secure, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 23
I have, by many yards at least, been carding Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 3
Been made for Cleopatra's winding sheet; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 50
Greek busts and statuary have ever been Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 55
Perchance speak, kneel, touch, kiss - in sooth such things have been . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 81
But he has never been a king's son since When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 34
To one who in this lonely isle hath been Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 71
O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been Ode to a Nightingale, Line 11
I have been half in love with easeful Death, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 52
My sleep had been embroider'd with dim dreams; Ode on Indolence, Line 42
My soul had been a lawn besprinkled o'er Ode on Indolence, Line 43
For, without thee, this day I might have been Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 166
And then to me no mercy had been shown, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 169
As though my hopes of favour had been whole. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 75
Your doctrine has not been so harsh to him Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 85
What gipsies have you been carousing with? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 38
Might have been trodden out, all sure and hush'd; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 18
Albert, I have been waiting for you here Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 106
I see it - I see it - I have been wandering! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 175
Fresh anchor'd; whither he had been awhile Lamia, Part I, Line 226
And been well nurtured in his mother tongue. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 15
Which needs had been of dyed asbestus wove, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 74
Cham is said to have been the inventor of magic. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
BEES..............14
A bush of May flowers with the bees about them; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 29
Hide in deep herbage; and ere yet the bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 51
Their ripen'd fruitage; yellow girted bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 253
Of mealy sweets, which myriads of bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 996
As bees gorge full their cells. And, by the feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 40
Just when the light of morn, with hum of bees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 419
She would weep that her wild bees Robin Hood, Line 46
Even bees , the little almsmen of spring-bowers, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 103
And glossy bees at noon do fieldward pass, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 309
And there by zephyrs, streams, and birds, and bees , Ode to Psyche, Line 56
For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 10
And, like new flowers at morning song of bees , Lamia, Part I, Line 142
And still more, later flowers for the bees , To Autumn, Line 9
Many as bees about a straw-capp'd hive, The Jealousies, Line 260
 
BEETLE............2
Nor let the beetle , nor the death-moth be Ode on Melancholy, Line 6
How dar'st thou lift those beetle brows at me? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
 
BEETLING..........2
Pervaded all the beetling gloomy steeps, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 358
So that his frost-white eyebrows, beetling low, The Jealousies, Line 506
 
BEFAL.............1
Good visions in the air,- whence will befal , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 830
 
BEFEL.............3
The enchantment that afterwards befel ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 573
Such seeing hadst thou, as it once befel To Homer, Line 13
For truth's sake, what woe afterwards befel , Lamia, Part I, Line 395
 
BEFITS............2
A solitary sorrow best befits Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 5
My salutation as befits the time. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 54
 
BEFITTING.........1
Befitting best that shade with shade should meet: The Jealousies, Line 23
 
BEFORE............112
When no fair dreams before my "mind's eye" flit, To Hope, Line 3
Turn to whence they sprung before . Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 16
Greeted, as he had known them long before . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 33
His spirit flies before him so completely. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 63
Before the point of his light shallop reaches Calidore: A Fragment, Line 67
Till their stern forms before my mind arise: Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 11
What time you were before the music sitting, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 113
These will in throngs before my mind intrude: How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 6
Trips it before Apollo than the rest. To G.A.W., Line 14
Passing along before a dusky space Sleep and Poetry, Line 139
O may these joys be ripe before I die. Sleep and Poetry, Line 269
A vast idea before me, and I glean Sleep and Poetry, Line 291
Spreads awfully before me. How much toil! Sleep and Poetry, Line 307
To bow for gratitude before Jove's throne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 150
Before he went to live with owls and bats, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 1
before I bid it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
Is growing fresh before me as the green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 38
Before the daisies, vermeil rimm'd and white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 50
Before the deep intoxication. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 502
And faint away, before my eager view: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 588
Such follying before thee - yet she had, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 612
Before my heedless footsteps stirr'd, and stirr'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 699
Although, before the crystal heavens darken, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 739
To mortal steps, before thou canst be ta'en Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 125
Till, weary, he sat down before the maw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 271
There, when new wonders ceas'd to float before , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 274
Before mine eyes thick films and shadows float- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 323
Before his footsteps; as when heav'd anew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 347
Dancing before the morning gates of heaven? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 688
Too palpable before me - the sad look Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 790
Pass'd like a dream before him. Then the spur Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 894
Severe before me: persecuting fate! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1006
Before that care-worn sage, who trembling felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 290
That glar'd before me through a thorny brake. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 493
Before the fierce witch, speaking thus aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 538
I fled three days - when lo! before me stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 566
Large froth before me, while there yet remain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 613
So vanish'd: and not long, before arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 651
Shall stand before him; whom he shall direct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 709
Before the Water-Monarch. Nectar ran Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 925
Of elements! Eternally before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 945
We lay our hearts before thee evermore- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 966
Before he went into his quiet cave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 996
Her ready eggs, before I'll kissing snatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1026
Before our forests heard the talk of men; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 6
Before the first of Druids was a child;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 7
Before me, till from these enslaving eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 50
We dance before him thorough kingdoms wide:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 225
Before the vine-wreath crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 258
Before young Bacchus' eye-wink turning pale.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 267
Swifter than sight was gone - even before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 337
Danae's Son, before Jove newly bow'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 606
Before the serene father of them all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 929
Before his goddess, in a blissful swoon. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 999
Before three swiftest kisses he had told, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1001
Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 2
Before high piled books, in charactry, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 3
Before it can put forth its blossoming. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 12
There came before my eyes that wonted thread Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 2
Before the door had given her to his eyes; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 18
All close they met again, before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 81
All close they met, all eves, before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 83
Before they fix'd upon a surest way Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 171
To make all bare before he dares to stray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 254
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 1
Before the earth beneath me; even such, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 8
continued for a few minutes before he thus began,) Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
And all the bliss to be before to-morrow morn. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 72
A quavering like three reeds before the wind- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 46
Beauty before the wide world never knew- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 60
Unseen before by Gods or wondering men, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 183
Not heard before by Gods or wondering men. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 185
Jarr'd his own golden region; and before Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 224
Before the dawn in season due should blush, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 265
Before the tense string murmur.- To the earth! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 345
That was before our brows were taught to frown, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 339
Before our lips knew else but solemn sounds; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 340
That was before we knew the winged thing, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 341
Mantled before in darkness and huge shade, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 365
Goddess! I have beheld those eyes before , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 59
Thou shalt taste, before the stains Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 59
One morn before me were three figures seen, Ode on Indolence, Line 1
Yes, so serious, that before Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 25b
Vouchsafe a syllable, before he bids Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
What! would you have me sue before his throne, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 64
Make not your father blind before his time; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 122
Your plight before , and, by her son, I swear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 31
Are bow'd before the mitre. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 61a
That your knight Albert be brought here before you. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 189
Almost before the recent ink is dry, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 266
Pass the high stars, before sweet embassage Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Who never shook before . There's moody death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 4
She shall be brought before this company, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 97
I fain would see before I sleep,- and Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 112
Set her before me - never fear I can strike. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 182
Upon a time, before the faery broods Lamia, Part I, Line 1
Before King Oberon's bright diadem, Lamia, Part I, Line 3
A woman's shape, and charming as before . Lamia, Part I, Line 118
Faded before him, cower'd, nor could restrain Lamia, Part I, Line 137
Late on that eve, as 'twas the night before Lamia, Part I, Line 319
While yet he spake they had arrived before Lamia, Part I, Line 378
Arose and knelt before him, wept a rain Lamia, Part II, Line 66
Without a gap, yet ne'er before had seen Lamia, Part II, Line 154
Before each lucid pannel fuming stood Lamia, Part II, Line 175
Before its wreathed doorway, on a mound The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 28
One minute before death, my iced foot touch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 132
What 'tis to die and live again before The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 142
To see them sprawl before me into graves. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 210
At those few words hung vast before my mind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 307
Set him before me. Not for the poor sake King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 2
Before her marriage with great Elfinan; The Jealousies, Line 111
"Five minutes before one - brought down a moth The Jealousies, Line 649
 
BEFORNE...........1
Men han beforne they wake in bliss, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 100
 
BEFRIENDED........1
And whom they thought to injure they befriended . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 94
 
BEG...............2
O why didst thou pity and beg for a worm? God of the golden bow, Line 20
To half beg , and half demand, respectfully, The Jealousies, Line 30
 
BEGAN.............40
Than I began to think of rhymes and measures: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 98
So I straightway began to pluck a posey I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 27
Young companies nimbly began dancing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 313
And, sitting down close by, began to muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 558
When, presently, the stars began to glide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 587
And, downward, suddenly began to dip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 87
And anxiously began to plait and twist Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 102
Glow-worms began to trim their starry lamps, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 141
He had touch'd his forehead, he began to thread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 266
Long time ere soft caressing sobs began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 736
Had been my dreary death? Fool! I began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 374
Began to tear his scroll in pieces small, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 747
Meantime a glorious revelry began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 924
When that same treacherous wax began to run, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 443
And Vesper, risen star, began to throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 485
For, never since thy griefs and woes began , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 546
Grow impious." So he inwardly began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 961
Nurse of swart nations since the world began , To the Nile, Line 5
Then with her knife, all sudden, she began Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 367
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
Ever such a work began ; Not Aladdin magian, Line 2
lips when she dashed it to the ground, for the mountain began to grumble; which Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
continued for a few minutes before he thus began ,) Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
But, curb'd and baffled, he began O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 69
My heart began to burn - and only pains, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 10
At which fair Madeline began to weep, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 302
The Dwarf began to tremble and the Ape When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 18
The Dwarf with piteous face began to rhyme. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 21
The Ape for very fear began to dance, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 48
Her pocket mirror and began to look When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 52
Arose, with locks not oozy, and began , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 170
Began calm-throated. Throughout all the isle Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 38
Which he with eager guess began to read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 48
Then, once again, the charmed God began Lamia, Part I, Line 112
Left to herself, the serpent now began Lamia, Part I, Line 146
Due adoration, thus began to adore; Lamia, Part I, Line 255
Into another, she began to sing, Lamia, Part I, Line 297
Of joys; and she began to moan and sigh Lamia, Part II, Line 37
At five the golden light began to spring, The Jealousies, Line 716
Began a prothalamion;- she reels, The Jealousies, Line 778
 
BEGETTERS.........1
Begetters of our deep eternal theme! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 10
 
BEGGAR............2
Paled in and vineyarded from beggar -spies; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 132
Or poorest of the beggar -clan, Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 5
 
BEGIN.............6
Resolving to begin that very day Sleep and Poetry, Line 402
Of our own vallies: so I will begin Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 39
To your dimpled arms. Once more sweet life begin !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 506
Now I begin to feel thine orby power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 180
And bid the day begin , if but for change. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 291
Let me begin my dream. To Fanny, Line 6
 
BEGINNING.........1
Thou art not the beginning nor the end. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 190
 
BEGINS............6
Till it begins to progress silverly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 541
And, for my tortur'd brain begins to craze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 116
Just when the sufferer begins to burn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 533
When the chill rain begins at shut of eve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 36
Grew up like organ, that begins anew Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 126
Of fragrant curtain'd Love begins to weave The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 11
 
BEGIRT............1
Begirt with ministring looks: alway his eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 150
 
BEGONE............5
So haggard and so woe- begone ? La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 6
Lie!- but begone all ceremonious points Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 89b
Begone ! I pity thee; thou art a gull, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 101
" Begone , foul dream!" he cried, gazing again Lamia, Part II, Line 271
Begone !- for you, Chaldean! here remain; The Jealousies, Line 357
 
BEGOT.............1
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 3
 
BEGUILE...........4
I could e'en Dido of her grief beguile ; Imitation of Spenser, Line 21
E'en so the words of love beguile , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 21
He doth his green way beguile Robin Hood, Line 28
Art thou so fruitful? or dost thou beguile To the Nile, Line 6
 
BEGUN.............11
Begun in gentleness die so away. Sleep and Poetry, Line 314
Or moon, if that her hunting be begun . On The Story of Rimini, Line 8
He had begun a plaining of his woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 547
And a blush for just begun it. O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 8
I dreamed long ago. Now new begun , On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 4
Who, penitent ere he'd begun O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 75
The bells had ceas'd, the prayers begun , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 23
Thereto his beard had not begun to bloom, Character of C.B., Line 6
As if calamity had but begun ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 38
His patient thought, had now begun to thaw, Lamia, Part II, Line 161
As if calamity had but begun ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 340
 
BEHAVE............1
Behave as all were happy; keep your eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 15
 
BEHAVIOURS........1
Like good men in the truth of their behaviours . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 86
 
BEHELD............19
That e'er my rev'ling eyes beheld , Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 11
Beheld thee, pluck'd thee, cast thee in the stream To George Felton Mathew, Line 82
Who had beheld Belphoebe in a brook, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 35
Thou hadst beheld the Hesperean shine To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
All I beheld and felt. Methought I lay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 578
In little journeys, I beheld in it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 700
But I beheld its birth upon the brine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 362
Stood trembling creatures. I beheld the wreck; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 658
Beheld awake his very dream: the gods Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 436
Dawn'd in blue and full of love. Aye, he beheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 986
Methought I had beheld it from the Flood. Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 41
When I beheld her on the earth descend, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 9
Her eyes were open, but she still beheld , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 298
Have ye beheld the young God of the Seas, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 232
Have ye beheld his chariot, foam'd along Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 234
And they beheld , while still Hyperion's name Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 347
Goddess! I have beheld those eyes before, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 59
Lamia beheld him coming, near, more near- Lamia, Part I, Line 237
Beheld afar off, in the hooded shade The Jealousies, Line 660
 
BEHEMOTH..........1
Of beast, behemoth , and leviathon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 134
 
BEHEST............1
Without one muse's smile, or kind behest , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 37
 
BEHIND............16
And behind each ample curl Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 17
And thought to leave her far away behind ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 175
Behind great Dian's temple. I'll be yon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 914
Must see behind , as doth the hunted hare. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 144
Blood-red the sun may set behind black mountain peaks; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 17
And the souls ye left behind you Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 25
Nor look behind , nor sideways, but require The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 53
Behind a broad hall-pillar, far beyond The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 94
But dares not look behind , or all the charm is fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 234
Had come to mock behind her back, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 87
And one behind the other stepp'd serene, Ode on Indolence, Line 3
Wilt thou creep dastardly behind his back, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 246
Behind a barrier of engender'd guilt! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 95
Behind enwombed: what high tragedy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 277
And prithee, Hum, behind the screen do peep The Jealousies, Line 430
For there was more magnificence behind : The Jealousies, Line 595
 
BEHOLD............39
Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 1
Proud to behold him in his country's eye. Addressed to Haydon, Line 14
Full alchemiz'd, and free of space. Behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 780
And, therefore, was just going; when, behold ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 893
Stand anxious: see! behold !" - This clamant word Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 494
Came louder, and behold , there as he lay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 917
Gain'd its bright portal, enter'd, and behold ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 631
Has legion'd all his battle; and behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 729
" Behold ! behold, the palace of his pride! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 833
"Behold! behold , the palace of his pride! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 833
And then, behold ! large Neptune on his throne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 862
Behold !"- Two copious tear-drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
Yet if thou wilt behold all beauty's store, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 58
Behold her panting in the forest grass! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 59
From some approaching wonder, and behold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 363
The mournful wanderer dreams. Behold ! he walks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 407
By Daphne's fright, behold Apollo!-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 611a
Behold upon this happy earth we are; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 625
Me to behold thee thus in last extreme: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 771
Behold I find it! so exalted too! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 880
She gave her fair hands to him, and behold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 1000
When I behold , upon the night's starr'd face, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 5
But you never may behold Robin Hood, Line 23
But I behold thine eyes' well-memoried light; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 6
Thou shalt, at one glance, behold Fancy, Line 47
To see and to behold these horrors new? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 233
Now I behold in you fear, hope, and wrath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 332
"Titans, behold your God!" at which some groan'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 110
So thrived I as a rebel,- and, behold ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 42
There is no face I rather would behold Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 44
Cures not his keen impatience to behold Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 12
So taking a disguise;- you shall behold her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 72
Thou shalt behold her, Hermes, thou alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 110
to behold . The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Thou shalt with those dull mortal eyes behold , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 247
Let me behold , according as thou said'st, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 289
Glocester, no more: I will behold that Boulogne: King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 1
And legend-leaved book, mysterious to behold . The Jealousies, Line 513
" Behold , your Majesty, upon the brow The Jealousies, Line 543
 
BEHOLDS...........1
But he revives at once: for who beholds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 637
 
BEING.............29
Had touch'd her plaintive lute; and thou, being by, To Lord Byron, Line 4
Ah! who can e'er forget so fair a being ? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 29
His present being : so he gently drew Calidore: A Fragment, Line 101
What 'tis I mean, and feel his being glow: Sleep and Poetry, Line 44
Into my being , and each pleasant scene Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 37
And, being hidden, laugh at their out-peeping; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 273
Men's being mortal, immortal; to shake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 844
Their marble being : now, as deep profound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 210
"O known Unknown! from whom my being sips Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 739
Of pains resistless! make my being brief, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 540
Felt a high certainty of being blest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 795
Each richer by his being a murderer. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 224
But being too happy in thine happiness,- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 6
Which, being noble, fell to Gersa's lot. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 67
Not being quite recover'd from the stun Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51
Which, being pleasant, ease the heavy pulse, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
These draperies are fine, and, being a mortal, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 31
Being gloomy-minded, haters of fair revels,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 57
Being a wife most mild and dutiful. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 77
Being garnish'd for the sacrifice, and I, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 155
Had not a friend. So being left alone, Lamia, Part II, Line 111
molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Unmask'd, and being seen - without a blot! I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 4
His gleaming battle axe being slaughter sick, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 38
Being a king, I will not yield alive King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 24
His mouth being held conveniently fit The Jealousies, Line 421
That, being fuddled, he went reeling through The Jealousies, Line 624
The stair-head; that being glutted as a leach, The Jealousies, Line 626
Too ripe, he fell, being puzzled in his head The Jealousies, Line 629
 
BEING'S...........2
To their spirit's perch, their being's high account, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 14
Why did I laugh? I know this being's lease- Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 9
 
BELABOUR'D........1
Of trumpets, shoutings, and belabour'd drums, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 17
 
BELDAME...........2
Save one old beldame , weak in body and in soul. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 90
A stratagem, that makes the beldame start: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 139
 
BELEAGUER'D.......1
In this beleaguer'd camp? Or are you here Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
 
BELFRY............1
Each in its ancient belfry nest, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 64
 
BELIE.............1
For pity do not this sad heart belie - Lamia, Part I, Line 259
 
BELIEF............3
Fancy into belief : anon it leads Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 234
Warming and glowing strong in the belief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 299
They could not surely give belief , that such Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 461
 
BELIEV'D..........1
Gersa, how he believ'd you innocent. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 152
 
BELIEVE...........14
Am I not cruelly wrong'd? Believe , believe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 748
Am I not cruelly wrong'd? Believe, believe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 748
Sure I will not believe thou hast such store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 809
To all his friends, and they believe him not. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 66
If thou didst ever any thing believe , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 59
Believe how I love thee, believe how near Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 60
Believe how I love thee, believe how near Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 60
Good Angela, believe me by these tears; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 150
I do believe you. No 'twas not to make Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 37
Farewell! and by these tears believe , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 115b
Believe me, I am well nigh sure- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 146a
I shall believe in wizard-woven loves Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
That we believe him sick, which must not be. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 55
Glocester has fit rewards - nay, I believe King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 47
 
BELIEVED..........1
Among the shepherds, 'twas believed ever, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 73
 
BELIEVING.........2
Too, too late for the fond believing lyre, Ode to Psyche, Line 37
To most believing Otho; and so help'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
 
BELL..............20
Ah! when I hear each traitorous lying bell , Lines Written on 29 May, Line 4
Startles the wild bee from the fox-glove bell . O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 8
The voice of waters - the great bell that heaves How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 11
While the chime- bell ringeth- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 4
The steeple- bell rings, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 11
Over the darkest, lushest blue- bell bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 631
Rise, Cupids! or we'll give the blue- bell pinch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 505
Forget-me-not - the blue- bell - and, that queen Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 11
You know I'd sooner be a clapping bell Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 107
And many a chapel bell the hour is telling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 310
But that her bell has rung. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 52
Whose passing- bell may ere the midnight toll; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 156
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 2
Twice holy was the Sabbath bell : The Eve of St. Mark, Line 13
Upon the first toll of his passing- bell , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 173
Forlorn! the very word is like a bell Ode to a Nightingale, Line 71
That but a moment's thought is passion's passing bell . Lamia, Part II, Line 39
Upon the first toll of his passing bell : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 22
He rose, he stampt his foot, he rang the bell , The Jealousies, Line 177
He bow'd at Bellanaine, and said- "Poor Bell ! The Jealousies, Line 609
 
BELLANAINE........10
The hand of his fair daughter Bellanaine ; The Jealousies, Line 31
So she was silenced, and fair Bellanaine , The Jealousies, Line 73
The name of Bellanaine , if you're not blind; The Jealousies, Line 102
"Ah, cursed Bellanaine !" "Don't think of her," The Jealousies, Line 433
Bertha or Bellanaine ." So saying, he drew The Jealousies, Line 438
On any terms, marry Miss Bellanaine ; The Jealousies, Line 461
To see my pigsney Bellanaine . Hum! do The Jealousies, Line 547
He bow'd at Bellanaine , and said- "Poor Bell! The Jealousies, Line 609
"And ' Bellanaine for ever!' shouted they, The Jealousies, Line 739
"Still ' Bellanaine !' they shouted, while we glide The Jealousies, Line 748
 
BELLE.............2
In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
They cried - "La belle dame sans merci La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 39
 
BELLIES...........1
Their silver bellies on the pebbly sand. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 77
 
BELLONA'S.........1
One from Bellona's gleaming armoury, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 2
 
BELLOW............1
Ten hecatombs shall bellow out their last, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 130
 
BELLOWS...........1
My voice is not a bellows unto ire. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 176
 
BELLS.............16
the Anniversary of Charles's Restoration, on Hearing the Bells Lines Written on 29 May, Extended Title
And where the bee with cowslip bells was wrestling. To George Felton Mathew, Line 50
To show their purple stars, and bells of amber. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 137
The spreading blue bells : it may haply mourn I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 43
The church bells toll a melancholy round, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 1
Blue hare- bells lightly, and where prickly furze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 202
Down in the blue- bells , or a wren light rustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 451
Made delicate from all white-flower bells ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 669
Light hether- bells may tremble then, but they are far away; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 13
All the buds and bells of May, Fancy, Line 33
Underneath large blue- bells tented, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 13
The bells had ceas'd, the prayers begun, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 23
With buds, and bells , and stars without a name, Ode to Psyche, Line 61
Of trellis vines, and bells , and larger blooms, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 26
Hark! hark! the bells !" "A little further get, The Jealousies, Line 564
The morn was full of holiday; loud bells The Jealousies, Line 568
 
BELONG............2
Sweet are the pleasures that to verse belong , To George Felton Mathew, Line 1
For here, in truth, it doth not well belong Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 390
 
BELONG'D..........3
Belong'd to one whose early pall O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 57
This ideot-skull belong'd to one, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 73
That since belong'd to Admiral De Witt, The Jealousies, Line 416
 
BELOVED...........2
My beloved Trinity. Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 6
Of my own breast thou shalt, beloved youth!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 981
 
BELOW.............10
Vieing with fish of brilliant dye below ; Imitation of Spenser, Line 11
Soft breezes from the myrtle vale below ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 195
Forth from a rugged arch, in the dusk below , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 639
Among the abodes of mortals here below , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 628
And by another, in deep dell below , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 679
Bows down his summer head below the west. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 930
That finer spirits cannot breathe below Lamia, Part I, Line 280
Reflected in the slabbed steps below , Lamia, Part I, Line 381
Forth from his hood that hung his neck below , The Jealousies, Line 509
Tinging it with soft crimsons! Now below The Jealousies, Line 554
 
BELPHOEBE.........1
Who had beheld Belphoebe in a brook, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 35
 
BELT..............4
Crystalline brother of the belt of heaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 581
With belt , and spur, and bracing huntsman's dress. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 192
Ulysses stormed, and his enchanted belt Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 11
Tighten my belt a little,- so, so,- not The Jealousies, Line 548
 
BELTED............1
Gone, the tough- belted outlaw Robin Hood, Line 35
 
BELTING...........1
Circles, and arcs, and broad- belting colure, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 274


Published @ RC

March 2005