Ben-Bi - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
BEN...............1
To see Ben Nevis and to touch his nose? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 46
 
BEN'S.............2
A domestic of Ben's . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line Keats's Note to Line 29
Another domestic of Ben's . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Keats's Note to Line 53
 
BENCHES...........1
I'll make the opposition- benches wince, The Jealousies, Line 138
 
BEND..............12
In a dainty bend they lie, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 9
O'er which bend four milky plumes Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 53
How silent comes the water round that bend ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 65
I bend unto your laws: Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 14
Young mountaineer! descend where alleys bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 203
Abrupt in middle air? Yet earthward bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 653
'Fore which I'll bend , bending, dear love, to thee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 712
Unus'd to bend , by hard compulsion bent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 300
Could bend that bow heroic to all times. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 75
For sidelong would she bend , and sing La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 23
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, To Autumn, Line 5
To sage advisers let me ever bend King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 10
 
BENDED............5
More boisterous than a lover's bended knee; Sleep and Poetry, Line 260
Ah, what a task! upon my bended knees, Sleep and Poetry, Line 310
The other upon Saturn's bended neck Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 45
The rebel-lords, on bended knees, received Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 100
The other upon Saturn's bended neck The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 347
 
BENDING...........14
But bending in a thousand graceful ways; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 4
From their sweet thrall, and forward gently bending , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 103
Another, bending o'er her nimble tread, Sleep and Poetry, Line 113
Bending their graceful figures till they meet Sleep and Poetry, Line 368
To picture out the quaint, and curious bending I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 19
Linger awhile upon some bending planks I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 61
Two bending laurel sprigs - 'tis nearly pain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 7
With uplift hands our foreheads, lowly bending , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 303
But Venus, bending forward, said: "My child, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 548
'Fore which I'll bend, bending , dear love, to thee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 712
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 24
He answer'd, bending to her open eyes, Lamia, Part II, Line 46
Touch'd his wide shoulders, after bending low The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 329
The frozen God still bending to the earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 386
 
BENDS.............3
Into many graceful bends : Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 14
And Phoebe bends towards him crescented. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 438
Who know him not. Each diligently bends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 895
 
BENEATH...........55
Beneath the waves like Afric's ebony, Imitation of Spenser, Line 17
Beneath thy pinions canopy my head! To Hope, Line 36
Beneath its rich shade did King Oberon languish, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 26
Beneath the curved moon's triumphal arch. To George Felton Mathew, Line 30
Beneath the shade of stately banneral, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 38
While from beneath the threat'ning portcullis Calidore: A Fragment, Line 79
He slants his neck beneath the waters bright To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 3
Find a fresh sward beneath it, overgrown Sleep and Poetry, Line 258
Beneath the silence of a poplar shade; Sleep and Poetry, Line 278
He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 8
Now coming from beneath the forest trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 148
A chieftain king's: beneath his breast, half bare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 172
Whether descended from beneath the rocks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 198
Beneath thy drowsy wing a triple hour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 462
It swells, it buds, it flowers beneath his sight; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 59
Went swift beneath the merry-winged guide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 83
And, while beneath the evening's sleepy frown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 140
Now fareth he, that o'er the vast beneath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 240
And from beneath a sheltering ivy leaf Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 65
Of weeds were cold beneath his cold thin feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 195
Smiling beneath a coral diadem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 776
Sitting beneath the midmost forest tree, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 144
" Beneath my palm trees, by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 182
" Beneath my palm trees, by the river side, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 188
Beneath dark palm trees by a river side? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 192
Precipitous: I have beneath my glance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 358
Up in the winds, beneath a starry roof, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 491
To sit beneath a fair lone beechen tree; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 767
And not a tree, beneath whose rooty shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 793
Fall'n beneath the dockyard strokes, Robin Hood, Line 44
They could not, sure, beneath the same roof sleep Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 7
Before the earth beneath me; even such, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 8
Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet; Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 10
Red-Crag, there lies beneath my farthest toe Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 48
There lies beneath my east leg's northern heel Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 54
Beneath the text; and thus the rhyme The Eve of St. Mark, Line 97
There standing fierce beneath , he stampt his foot, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 222
I see them, on the mortal world beneath , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 334
Should cower beneath what, in comparison, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 154
And hazels thick, dark-stemm'd beneath the shade: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 27
While from beneath some cumbrous boughs hard by Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 45
Beneath his white soft temples, stedfast kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 122
Beneath the cherish of a star Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 51
In deepest grass, beneath the whisp'ring roof Ode to Psyche, Line 10
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 15
Stifled beneath the thick oppressive shade Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 19
Carve it on my tomb, that, when I rest beneath , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 132
Stretch'd out, at ease, beneath a glutinous pine; Lamia, Part I, Line 210
All down the aisled place; and beneath all Lamia, Part II, Line 130
Might spread beneath , as o'er the stars of heaven; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 64
Thou standest safe beneath this statue's knees." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 181
Onward I look'd beneath the gloomy boughs, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 297
Still fix'd he sat beneath the sable trees, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 446
Lifted his eye-brows, spurn'd the path beneath , The Jealousies, Line 273
Beneath the green-fan'd cedars, some did shroud The Jealousies, Line 691
 
BENEDICTION.......3
And yet thy benediction passeth not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 61
Could grant in benediction : to be free Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 377
[Music. ETHELBERT raises his hands, as in benediction of Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
 
BENEDICTIONS......1
Rich benedictions o'er us; ye have wreathed Sleep and Poetry, Line 222
 
BENEFACTOR........1
Nor be pathetic, my kind benefactor , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 112
 
BENEFIT...........2
What benefit canst thou do, or all thy tribe, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 167
If wary, for your Highness' benefit - King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 6
 
BENEFITS..........3
And can I e'er these benefits forget? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 76
The world with benefits unknowingly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 827
Bearing with me a weight of benefits Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 138
 
BENEVOLENCE.......1
Our piece of heaven - whose benevolence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 37
 
BENIGHTED.........1
Benighted , close they huddled from the cold, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 391
 
BENIGN............6
Yes, every god be thank'd, and power benign , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 253
Of influence benign on planets pale, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 108
Goddess benign , point forth some unknown thing: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 95
Shutting with careful fingers and benign Sonnet to Sleep, Line 2
Benign , if so it please thee, my mind's film." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 146
Of influence benign on planets pale, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 414
 
BENIGNANT.........2
Had not a heavenly guide benignant led Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 377
They held me back, with a benignant light, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 265
 
BENIGNLY..........1
From the ninth sphere to me benignly sent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 3
 
BENISON...........2
Short is the benison ,- The Gothic looks solemn, Line 17
The benison of heaven on your head, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
 
BENT..............24
From their low palfreys o'er his neck they bent : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 87
The driver of those steeds is forward bent , Sleep and Poetry, Line 152
Thy deathful bow against some deer-herd bent , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 511
The burning prayer within him; so, bent low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 546
As if thine eye, high Poet! was not bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 48
Swifter than centaurs after rapine bent .- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 536
Grew drunken, and would have its head and bent . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 797
They led on first, bent to her meek surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 810
Of underwood, and to the sound is bent , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 42
Some enemy: far forth his bow is bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 598
There never liv'd a mortal man, who bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 646
His eyes are on thee bent , as thou didst poise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 843
Bent his soul fiercely like a spiritual bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 847
And bent by circumstance, and thereby blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 873
Of the garden-terrace, towards him they bent Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 179
The Stranger next with head on bosom bent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 6
Achilles by the hair and bent his neck; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 29
Unus'd to bend, by hard compulsion bent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 300
Because I cannot flatter with bent knees Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 106
Look at the Emperor's brow upon me bent ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 62
His golden throne, bent warm on amorous theft: Lamia, Part I, Line 8
So done, upon the nymph his eyes he bent Lamia, Part I, Line 134
Whither I bent her force, What can I do to drive away, Line 13
Submissive of knee- bent obeisance, The Jealousies, Line 753
 
BENUMB'D..........1
Benumb'd my eyes; my pulse grew less and less; Ode on Indolence, Line 17
 
BEQUEATH..........1
Ten hundred years: which gone, I then bequeath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 598
 
BEQUEST...........1
Let me not see the patriot's high bequest , To Hope, Line 37
 
BEREAVE...........1
And so long absence from thee doth bereave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 775
 
BEREAVES..........2
That distance of recognizance bereaves , How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 13
And the sick west continually bereaves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 251
 
BEREFT............5
Bereft of all that now my life endears? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 75
So sad, so melancholy, so bereft ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 685
As when of healthful midnight sleep bereft , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 323
So play'd, so charm'd, so conquer'd, so bereft As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 4
And rubious-argent: of all these bereft , Lamia, Part I, Line 163
 
BERRIED...........1
And I forgot thee, as the berried holly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 205
 
BERRIES...........7
High as the berries of a wild ash tree, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 114
Fresher than berries of a mountain tree? Sleep and Poetry, Line 20
Shading its Ethiop berries ; and woodbine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 413
Red whortle- berries droop above my head, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 298
The flint was there, the berries at his head. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 352
Make not your rosary of yew- berries , Ode on Melancholy, Line 5
Among the fragrant husks and berries crush'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 52
 
BERRY.............3
Dost thou now please thy thirst with berry -juice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 327
Will drop their scarlet berry cups of dew? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 674
And for each briar- berry he might eat, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 7
 
BERTHA............19
And Bertha had not yet half done The Eve of St. Mark, Line 24
Bertha was a maiden fair The Eve of St. Mark, Line 39
Bertha arose and read awhile, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 48
Sweet Bertha ! what crime can it be to glide The Jealousies, Line 169
My Bertha !" "Bertha! Bertha!" cried the sage, The Jealousies, Line 371
My Bertha!" " Bertha ! Bertha!" cried the sage, The Jealousies, Line 371
My Bertha!" "Bertha! Bertha !" cried the sage, The Jealousies, Line 371
There's Bertha Watson,- and Miss Bertha Page,- The Jealousies, Line 376
There's Bertha Watson,- and Miss Bertha Page,- The Jealousies, Line 376
There's Bertha Blount of York,- and Bertha Knox of Perth." The Jealousies, Line 378
There's Bertha Blount of York,- and Bertha Knox of Perth." The Jealousies, Line 378
Named Bertha ; but her surname will not come, The Jealousies, Line 381
'Tis Bertha Pearl! What makes my brain so whirl? The Jealousies, Line 383
Rejoin'd the mago, "but on Bertha muse; The Jealousies, Line 434
Bertha or Bellanaine." So saying, he drew The Jealousies, Line 438
"Sire, this is Bertha Pearl's neat handy-work, The Jealousies, Line 442
In loving pretty little Bertha , since The Jealousies, Line 475
If you hold Bertha as a worthy prize. The Jealousies, Line 499
That shall drive Bertha to a fainting fit! The Jealousies, Line 519
 
BERTHA'S..........2
The little Bertha's eyes ope on the stars serene." The Jealousies, Line 396
Lay it on Bertha's table, close beside The Jealousies, Line 524
 
BERTHAS...........3
"I know a many Berthas !" "Mine's above The Jealousies, Line 372
All Berthas !" sighed the Emperor. "I engage," The Jealousies, Line 373
To mention all the Berthas in the earth;- The Jealousies, Line 375
 
BESEECH...........2
Beseech you, sire, forbear. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 36a
'Cross the broad table, to beseech a glance Lamia, Part II, Line 243
 
BESEECHING........2
Thus brief; then with beseeching eyes she went Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 153
Beseeching him, the while his hand she wrung, Lamia, Part II, Line 68
 
BESEEM............1
For venturing syllables that ill beseem Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 151
 
BESET.............2
Beset with plainful gusts, within ye hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 529
She hurried at his words, beset with fears, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 352
 
BESETS............1
Our spirit's wings: despondency besets Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 22
 
BESIDE............18
Were heard of none beside the mournful robbins. This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 14
Beside the feathery whizzing of the shaft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 333
And more of beautiful and strange beside : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 391
Beside this old man lay a pearly wand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 213
Kneel'd down beside it, and with tenderest force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 779
Down beside the pasture Trent; Robin Hood, Line 30
That old nurse stood beside her wondering, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 377
Beside her basil, weeping through her hair. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 472
Beside a crumple-leaved tale of love; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 37
For Madeline. Beside the portal doors, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 76
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 279
Not far hence Atlas; and beside him prone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 73
Beside the osiers of a rivulet, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 34
He sank supine beside the aching ghost. Lamia, Part II, Line 294
And, coming nearer, saw beside the shrine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 95
Upon those streams that pulse beside the throat: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 125
In midmost Ind, beside Hydaspes cool, The Jealousies, Line 1
Lay it on Bertha's table, close beside The Jealousies, Line 524
 
BESIDES...........8
Sweet poesy by moonlight: besides these, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 369
Nurture besides , and life, from human fears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 429
Besides , the foolish Prince sends, minute whiles, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 35
Besides , I thirst to pledge my lovely bride Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 119
Besides , there, nightly, with terrific glare, Lamia, Part II, Line 11
Besides , for all his love, in self despite, Lamia, Part II, Line 72
Besides the goods meanwhile thou movest east and west. The Jealousies, Line 243
" Besides , manners forbid that I should pass any The Jealousies, Line 469
 
BESIEGING.........1
Flutter'd in the besieging wind's uproar; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 359
 
BESPANGLED........1
Fountains grotesque, new trees, bespangled caves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 458
 
BESPREAD..........2
'Tis with dew bespread . Hither, hither, love, Line 8
A vaulted dome like heaven's, far bespread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 631
 
BESPRENT..........1
Her mouth foam'd, and the grass, therewith besprent , Lamia, Part I, Line 148
 
BESPRINKLED.......1
My soul had been a lawn besprinkled o'er Ode on Indolence, Line 43
 
BEST..............25
That with its tyrant temper best accords, Ode to Apollo, Line 28
Stretch'd on the grass at my best lov'd employment To My Brother George (epistle), Line 120
That I can never tell what mood is best . To G.A.W., Line 12
And one will teach a tame dove how it best Sleep and Poetry, Line 111
But now of all the world I love thee best . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 284
Truth the best music in a first-born song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 773
Making the best of 's way towards Soho. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 12
Whose matter in bright gold were best be read; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 94
Then will the dragons fry and fizz their best , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 60
Had wrought upon ye; and how I might best Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 241
A solitary sorrow best befits Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 5
Make your best bow to her and bid adieu; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 13
It is the best physician for the spleen; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 8
Daughter, your hand; Ludolph's would fit it best . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 201
Or, if't please you best - Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 36c
Best ask your lady sister, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 70b
Will leave this busy castle. You had best Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 172
They know their own thoughts best . As for the third, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 58
Befitting best that shade with shade should meet: The Jealousies, Line 23
"Certes, monsieur were best take to his feet, The Jealousies, Line 257
With his best beard and brimstone, to explore The Jealousies, Line 287
And knock'd down three cut glasses, and his best ink-stand. The Jealousies, Line 351
To catch the treasure: " Best in all the town!" The Jealousies, Line 422
For, by my choicest best barometer, The Jealousies, Line 435
Anon, I'll tell what course were best to take; The Jealousies, Line 493
 
BESTIR............2
Bestir - bestir - Auranthe! Ha! ha! ha! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 177
Bestir - bestir - Auranthe! Ha! ha! ha! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 177
 
BESTIRR'D.........1
Bestirr'd themselves, thrice horrible and cold; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 256
 
BESTOW............1
When summer nights the dews bestow , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 9
 
BESTRIDDEN........1
Bestridden of gay knights, in gay apparel, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 27
 
BESTRIDE..........1
Bestride your steed while cold is in the skies. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 184
 
BESTROWN..........1
It was a jasmine bower, all bestrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 670
 
BETAKE............1
A higher summons:- still didst thou betake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 16
 
BETHINK...........1
A foolish tongue, that I may bethink me Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 4
 
BETHINKING........1
Bethinking thee, how melancholy loth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 242
 
BETIDE............9
"Why must such desolation betide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 126
Bacchus, young Bacchus! good or ill betide , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 224
Burns in thee, child?- What good can thee betide , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 349
Whatever he shall wish, betide her weal or woe. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 162
No uttered syllable, or, woe betide ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 203
And there I dream'd - Ah! woe betide ! La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 34
And they were strange to me, as may betide Ode on Indolence, Line 9
To a cold dullard fay,- ah, woe betide ! The Jealousies, Line 167
I say no more." "Or good or ill betide , The Jealousies, Line 526
 
BETIDES...........1
More happy than betides mortality. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 859
 
BETIMES...........1
Where asleep they fall betimes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 65
 
BETRAY'D..........2
The misery his brilliance had betray'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 369
Of deep sleep in a moment was betray'd . Lamia, Part II, Line 105
 
BETTER............21
"Write! thou wilt never have a better day." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 100
Yet, as my hand was warm, I thought I'd better To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 103
'Twere better far to hide my foolish face? Sleep and Poetry, Line 272
Thou, Carian lord, hadst better have been tost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 52
Ah! better had it been for ever so, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 87
O Lowther, how much better thou All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 21
Better than Southey it had been, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 29
Better than Mr. D--, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 30
Better than Wordsworth too, I ween, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 31
Better than Mr. V--. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 32
And may do better . O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 18
Could do you better service than mere words! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
I think I have a better fame abroad. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
Of times past, unremember'd! Better so Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 6
May I speed better ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 18a
Ward him from harm,- and bring me better news! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 51
I should desire no better ; yet, in truth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 32
Ye have none better ? No, I am content; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 81
Much better he came not. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 139a
Against his better self, he took delight Lamia, Part II, Line 73
Or thou might'st better listen to the wind, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 4
 
BETTER'D..........1
Jove heard his vows, and better'd his desire; Lamia, Part I, Line 229
 
BETTY.............2
Rantipole Betty she ran down a hill, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 5
For coals, and therefore no coals Betty brings. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 7
 
BETWEEN...........20
The purple west, and, two bright streaks between , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 11
Between her breasts, that never yet felt trouble, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 91
Mid-way between our homes:- your accents bland To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 122
Between their arms; some, clear in youthful bloom, Sleep and Poetry, Line 145
Between two hills. All hail delightful hopes! Sleep and Poetry, Line 264
Of out-spread wings, and from between them shone Sleep and Poetry, Line 393
of a man is healthy; but there is a space of life between , in which the soul is Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
Stems thronging all around between the swell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 83
Was hung a silver bugle, and between Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 173
An element filling the space between ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 301
Along a path between two little streams,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 415
A little breeze to creep between the fans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 764
Ready to melt between an infant's gums: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 451
Between her luscious lips and eyelids thin. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 942
Between her kissing breasts, and every charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 947
Plaining discrepant between sea and sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 342
Somewhere between the throne, and where I sit Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 115
Be cause of feud between us. See! he comes! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 119
I hope, resolv'd between us. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50a
Between the tree-stems, marbled plain at first, Lamia, Part II, Line 138
 
BETWIXT...........3
Betwixt damnation and impassion'd clay On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 6
Betwixt two marble shafts:- there they reposed, Lamia, Part II, Line 22
twenty-five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
BEVERAGE..........2
Sipping beverage divine, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 20
There's a beverage brighter and clearer! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 4
 
BEWAIL............2
For one whose cheek is pale: thou dost bewail Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 76
O let me then my hapless fate bewail ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 10
 
BEWAILING.........1
Bewailing earthly loss; nor could my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 441
 
BEWILDER'D........2
My brain bewilder'd , and my mind o'ercast To My Brother George (epistle), Line 2
Sinking bewilder'd mid the dreary sea: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 8
 
BEWILDERED........3
Bewildered shepherds to their path again; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 269
So fairy-quick, was strange! Bewildered , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 93
Wandering in vain about bewildered shores. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 9
 
BEWILDERING.......1
Leaving no drop in the bewildering cup, Lamia, Part I, Line 252
 
BEWITCH'D.........3
Bewitch'd me towards; and I soon was near Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 495
Bewitch'd I sure must be, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 277
How deep she has bewitch'd him! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Lady, Line 14b
 
BEYOND............45
Came to his ear, like something from beyond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 100
But what is higher beyond thought than thee? Sleep and Poetry, Line 19
A hope beyond the shadow of a dream. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 857
Beyond the matron-temple of Latona, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 862
And, just beyond , on light tiptoe divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 261
One thought beyond thy argent luxuries! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 186
How far beyond !" At this a surpris'd start Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 187
Here, that I too may live: but if beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 437
Beyond a silvery shower, was the arch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 852
Dovelike in the dim cell lying beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 65
O thou could'st foster me beyond the brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 306
Beyond the tall tree tops; and in less time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 332
Beyond the seeming confines of the space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 513
Who lives beyond earth's boundary, grief is dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 620
His appetite beyond his natural sphere, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 647
Beyond the reach of music: for the choir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 964
Of all beyond itself: thou dost bedew To the Nile, Line 11
Beyond its proper bound, yet still confined,- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 79
In happiness to see beyond our bourn- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 83
Comes from beyond the river to my bed: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 302
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
Beyond the sweet and bitter world - beyond it unaware; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 30
Beyond the sweet and bitter world - beyond it unaware; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 30
Hath pass'd beyond the rocky portal; Not Aladdin magian, Line 46
Beyond this world, this mortal time O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 63
Through the thought still spread beyond her: Fancy, Line 6
Behind a broad hall-pillar, far beyond The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 94
Beyond a mortal man impassion'd far The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 316
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 214
And as we show beyond that Heaven and Earth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 208
Beyond the nimble-wheeled quest Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 46
Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 30
Beyond all pleasures past, and all to come: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
The promise of fair sail beyond the Rhone, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 20
Whether the riddle puzzles her beyond Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 71
Insult beyond credence! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 219b
Hungarian! Thou amazest me beyond Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
Beyond a flower pluck'd, white as itself? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 25
His spirit pass'd beyond its golden bourn Lamia, Part II, Line 32
Because he mused beyond her, knowing well Lamia, Part II, Line 38
To No. 7, just beyond the Circus gay. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 17
The lily and the snow; and beyond these The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 262
His flaming robes stream'd out beyond his heels, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 58
Curricles, or mail-coaches, swift beyond compare." The Jealousies, Line 252
The city of Balk- 'twas Balk beyond all doubt: The Jealousies, Line 679
 
BIANCOPANY........1
That vulgar commoner, Esquire Biancopany ? The Jealousies, Line 162
 
BIBBERS...........1
Ye tender bibbers of the rain and dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 571
 
BICKER............1
I bicker not with her,- bid her farewell! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 150
 
BID...............25
From its fair face, shall bid our spirits fly. To My Brothers, Line 14
And can I ever bid these joys farewell? Sleep and Poetry, Line 122
And weep? Or did ye wholly bid adieu Sleep and Poetry, Line 215
Sigh thou mayest, but bid it go Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 3
before I bid it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
And here I bid it die. Have not I caught, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 986
No more delight - I bid adieu to all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 141
I on this spot will offer: Pan will bid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 634
And bid a long adieu." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 763a
But at the setting I must bid adieu Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 932
Lest I should miss to bid thee a good morrow: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 202
How long is't since the mighty power bid To Ailsa Rock, Line 5
And bid old Saturn take his throne again."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 250
And bid the day begin, if but for change. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 291
That it enforc'd me to bid sad farewell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 238
Make your best bow to her and bid adieu; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 13
Your leaves, nor ever bid the spring adieu; Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 22
O shadows! 'twas a time to bid farewell! Ode on Indolence, Line 49
I bicker not with her,- bid her farewell! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 150
But, as a favour, bid me from thy presence; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 110
And he put out an arm to bid me mount, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
Bid the musicians soothe him tenderly. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 80
And bid our trumpets speak a fell rebuke Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 163
Youngster! Page! go bid them drag her to me! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 178
With any pleasure on me, do not bid Lamia, Part II, Line 100
 
BIDDEST...........1
Thou biddest Shakspeare wave his hand, Ode to Apollo, Line 24
 
BIDDING...........6
Yet dry them up, in bidding hence all fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 475
That tend thy bidding , I do think the bars Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 185
To the void air, bidding them find out love: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 740
Bidding adieu; and aching Pleasure nigh, Ode on Melancholy, Line 23
With silver index, bidding thee make peace? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 9
Use other speech than looks; bidding him raise Lamia, Part I, Line 304
 
BIDDY.............1
As crying cup biddy to drops of rain. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 66
 
BIDS..............5
Of conscience bids me be more calm awhile. Sleep and Poetry, Line 305
For great Apollo bids I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 50
Widened a little, as when Zephyr bids Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 763
Vouchsafe a syllable, before he bids Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
Has just return'd. He bids me say, bright dame, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 10
 
BIER..............6
Musing on Milton's fate - on Sydney's bier - Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 10
Than the proud laurel shall content my bier . To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 4
In vain; remorseless as an infant's bier Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 520
No sound so loud as when on curtain'd bier Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 530
What wouldst thou ere we all are laid on bier ?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 973
Follow me, child, or else these stones will be thy bier ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 108
 
BIG...............5
Big as ten There was a naughty boy, Line 34
O aching time! O moments big as years! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 64
Meanwhile in other realms big tears were shed, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 158
Without a motion, save of their big hearts Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 26
In melancholy realms big tears are shed, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 7
 
BIGGER............3
No bigger than an unobserved star, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 498
Until ten thousand now no bigger than Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 61
Bigger than stags,- a moon,- with other mysteries. The Jealousies, Line 450
 
BILL..............2
By a swan's ebon bill ; from a thick brake, Sleep and Poetry, Line 226
See me - 'tis this silvery bill Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 13
 
BILLOW............1
Battle to the swollen billow -ridge, and drave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 612
 
BILLOWS...........4
Meekly through billows :- when like taper-flame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 116
Rough billows were my home by night and day,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 320
Me back to Scylla o'er the billows rude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 462
But could not: therefore all the billows green Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 654
 
BILLOWY...........1
Wasting of old time - with a billowy main - On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 13
 
BIND..............6
That they may bind the moss in leafy nets. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 34
To bind them all about with tiny rings. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 60
A flowery band to bind us to the earth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 7
And with the balmiest leaves his temples bind ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 382
For a mortal youth, and how she strove to bind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 459
In little time a host of joys to bind , To J.R., Line 11
 
BIRCH.............1
Of delicate birch trees, or long grass which hems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 51
 
BIRD..............18
Just like that bird am I in loss of time, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 15
O magic sleep! O comfortable bird , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 453
Like spiked aloe. If an innocent bird Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 698
To scud like a wild bird , and take thee off Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 698
Then, like a new fledg'd bird that first doth shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 388
She fled me swift as sea- bird on the wing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 404
Speeding away swift as the eagle bird ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 594
Well then, I see there is no little bird , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 877
As bird on wing to breast its eggs again; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 470
And, patient as a hen- bird , sat her there Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 471
Where a fledgy sea bird choir Not Aladdin magian, Line 41
'Tis the man who with a bird , Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 8
Why would you leave me, sweet bird , why? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 6
To hide themselves in forms of beast and bird . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 72
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird ! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 61
The bird -lim'd raven? She shall croak to death! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 107
Divine, I say!- What sea- bird o'er the sea What can I do to drive away, Line 15
And vanish'd, bird -like, o'er the suburb trees, The Jealousies, Line 129
 
BIRD'S............6
Bright as the humming- bird's green diadem, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 3
When the hen- bird's wing doth rest Fancy, Line 61
Not at dog's howl, or gloom- bird's hated screech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 171
About a young bird's flutter from a wood, Lamia, Part I, Line 180
Nor at dog's howl, or gloom- bird's even screech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 20
Look where we will, our bird's -eye vision meets The Jealousies, Line 732
 
BIRDS.............15
And float along like birds o'er summer seas; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 57
The songs of birds - the whisp'ring of the leaves- How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 10
All tenderest birds there find a pleasant screen, Sleep and Poetry, Line 252
When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 2
And birds from coverts innermost and drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 470
Juno's proud birds are pecking pearly grain: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 410
Sweet birds antheming the morn: Fancy, Line 42
And legless birds of paradise, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 80
And no birds sing. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 4
And no birds sing. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 48
And there by zephyrs, streams, and birds , and bees, Ode to Psyche, Line 56
They are no birds when eagles are abroad. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 192
There flowers have no scent, birds no sweet song, What can I do to drive away, Line 42
The little birds I hear are all alive; The Jealousies, Line 480
Tow'rds Thibet. Mem.:- birds fly in the night; The Jealousies, Line 645
 
BIRTH.............15
From thee, great God of Bards, receive their heavenly birth . Ode to Apollo, Line 47
This is your birth -day, Tom, and I rejoice To My Brothers, Line 9
Gently commingling, gives tremendous birth To Kosciusko, Line 12
And haply you will say the dewy birth To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 5
Eternal whispers, glooms, the birth , life, death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 234
Gives it a touch ethereal - a new birth : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 298
In a long whispering birth enchanted grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 346
Of our close voices marry at their birth ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 816
To watch the abysm- birth of elements. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 28
But I beheld its birth upon the brine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 362
This beauty in its birth - Despair! despair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 506
And I do think that at my very birth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 732
Stay'd in their birth , even as here 'tis told. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 295
Listen'd in pain and pleasure at the birth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 66
suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician by birth , and if he would Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
BIRTHPLACE........1
That he may stray league after league some great birthplace to find, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 47
 
BISHOP............1
Supports an old bishop and crosier; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 3
 
BISHOP'S..........2
For there's Bishop's Teign For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 1
Far as the bishop's garden wall, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 43
 
BISHOPRIC.........1
His son shall never touch that bishopric ; The Jealousies, Line 146
 
BIT...............4
And many times they bit their lips alone, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 170
What whining bit of tongue and mouth thus dares Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 21
That he is tearing you, sir, bit by bit." The Jealousies, Line 328
That he is tearing you, sir, bit by bit ." The Jealousies, Line 328
 
BITE..............4
Into a pretty shrinking with a bite Sleep and Poetry, Line 108
For Venus' pearly bite : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 214
"Take this same book,- it will not bite you, sire; The Jealousies, Line 514
Call'd for an extra shawl, and gave her nurse a bite . The Jealousies, Line 648
 
BITING............1
I'm faint - a biting sword! A noble sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 6
 
BITS..............3
Destroy'd?- how many tit bits stolen? Gaze To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 3
I must - I shall - I meet not such tit bits , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 40
Tit- bits for Phoebus!- yes, you well may smile. The Jealousies, Line 563
 
BITTER............16
Or rob from aged Lear his bitter teen: Imitation of Spenser, Line 22
E'er grew in Paphos, from the bitter weeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 249
A bitter coolness; the ripe grape is sour: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 35
Thou shouldst be one of all. Ah, bitter strife! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 751
The bitter -sweet of this Shaksperean fruit. On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 8
His bitter thoughts to other, well nigh mad Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 164
Beyond the sweet and bitter world - beyond it unaware; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 30
St. Agnes' Eve - Ah, bitter chill it was! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 1
Hover around that life, whose bitter days Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 33
Thou bitter mischief! Venemous bad priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 76
With more bad bitter grain, too difficult Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 175
His wine is bitter , for you are not there; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 63
Silent,- without revenge,- pshaw!- bitter end,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 21
A bitter death,- a suffocating death,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
Her head was serpent, but ah, bitter -sweet! Lamia, Part I, Line 59
Who prov'st, with jolting arguments and bitter , The Jealousies, Line 233
 
BITTER'D..........1
A cup of bitter'd water, and a crust,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 98
 
BITTERLY..........1
Thank the great gods, and look not bitterly ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 807
 
BITTERNESS........3
The bitterness of love: too long indeed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 105
The little sweet doth kill much bitterness ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 98
Knowing the Emperor's moody bitterness ; The Jealousies, Line 338
 
BITTERS...........1
proceeds mawkishness, and all the thousand bitters which those men I speak of Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph 4
 
BITUMEN...........1
And wrought by spumy bitumen Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 16
 
BIVOUAC'D.........1
Bivouac'd for four minutes on a cloud- The Jealousies, Line 686


Published @ RC

March 2005