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Keats Concordance
 
BO................1
And as this is the summum bo - All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 53
 
BOAR..............4
Around the breathed boar : again I'll poll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 481
When the boar tusk'd him: so away she flew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 474
No wild boar tushes, and no mermaid's toes: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 16
Hunted me as a Tartar does the boar , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 51
 
BOARD.............4
Mine host's sign- board flew away, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 14
On board a shallop. Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 20
As to my father's board I will return. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 153
Vowing he'd have them sent on board the gallies; The Jealousies, Line 223
 
BOARS.............1
When snouted wild- boars routing tender corn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 282
 
BOASTING..........1
Boasting he never knew excess, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 32
 
BOAT..............8
And now the sharp keel of his little boat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 19
So pushes off his boat most eagerly, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 59
With shatter'd boat , oar snapt, and canvass rent, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 17
While his boat hastens to the monstrous steep Sleep and Poetry, Line 88
My little boat , for many quiet hours, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 47
His nervy knees there lay a boat -spear keen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 174
They stept into the boat , and launch'd from land. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 992
And my boat danc'd in every creek and bay; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 319
 
BOATS.............2
Many old rotten-timber'd boats there be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 18
To cutters and to fashion boats , Not Aladdin magian, Line 51
 
BOB...............1
Of dolphins bob their noses through the brine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 311
 
BOCCACCIO.........2
A STORY FROM BOCCACCIO Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Subtitle
O eloquent and famed Boccaccio ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 145
 
BODDICE...........1
Loosens her fragrant boddice ; by degrees The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 229
 
BODE..............1
I would not bode of evil, if I thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 256
 
BODES.............1
It bodes ill to his Majesty - (refer The Jealousies, Line 705
 
BODIES............2
Staying their wavy bodies 'gainst the streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 73
Until their grieved bodies 'gan to bloat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 525
 
BODILY............2
A young mind from its bodily tenement. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 325
Could taste so nauseous to the bodily sense, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 24
 
BODING............1
So, when dark thoughts my boding spirit shroud, To Hope, Line 46
 
BODY..............13
O horrid dream - see how his body dips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 12
And, at that moment, felt my body dip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 663
He saw her body fading gaunt and spare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 507
Wilt thou devote this body to the earth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 731
And my body is earthward press'd: God of the meridian, Line 4
This mortal body of a thousand days This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 1
Save one old beldame, weak in body and in soul. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 90
I can, all safe in body and in soul, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 15
Of the weak body and soul? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 3a
When move in a sweet body fit for life, Lamia, Part I, Line 39
And, in its marriage robe, the heavy body wound. Lamia, Part II, Line 311
Writhing her little body with ennui, The Jealousies, Line 74
Who, turning much his body , more his neck, The Jealousies, Line 255
 
BODY'S............1
Of all her milder-mooned body's grace; Lamia, Part I, Line 156
 
BOIL..............3
And see the spangly gloom froth up and boil : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 326
Let the red wine within the goblet boil , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 18
Thou mak'st me boil as hot as thou canst flame! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
 
BOILEAU...........1
The name of one Boileau ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 206a
 
BOILING...........1
With sanguine feverous boiling gurge of pulse. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 28
 
BOISTEROUS........3
More boisterous than a lover's bended knee; Sleep and Poetry, Line 260
The boisterous , midnight, festive clarion, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 258
Of boisterous Chester, whose fell truncheon now King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 22
 
BOLD..............13
Of Armida the fair, and Rinaldo the bold ? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 8
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold : On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 8
See it half finished: but let autumn bold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 55
Those winged steeds, with snorting nostrils bold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 364
Drest as though bold Robin Hood Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 10
Little John, or Robin bold ; Robin Hood, Line 24
Honour to bold Robin Hood, Robin Hood, Line 57
So said, his erewhile timid lips grew bold , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 69
Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 17
Indeed too much oppress'd. May I be bold Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
Will make thy bold tongue quiver to the roots, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 87
Bold sinner, say you so? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 159b
The awed presence chamber may be bold King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 30
 
BOLDLY............1
Keep thy chains burst, and boldly say thou art free; On Peace, Line 12
 
BOLDNESS..........1
"Made racy - (sure my boldness is misplaced!)- The Jealousies, Line 367
 
BOLTS.............2
Oft hast thou seen bolts of the thunder hurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 205
By one, and one, the bolts full easy slide:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 367
 
BOND..............1
This marriage be the bond of endless peace! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 153
 
BONDAGE...........2
Throughout my bondage ." Thus discoursing, on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 723
Adorning bondage with the pleasant gloss King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 51
 
BONE..............4
Of flesh and bone , curbs, and confines, and frets Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 21
Cut Mercy with a sharp knife to the bone ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 174
And freezes utterly unto the bone Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 373
That bone , fie on't, bears just the shape O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 81
 
BONES.............11
A cloak of blue wrapp'd up his aged bones , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 197
Was sharpening for their pitiable bones . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 517
Thy fragile bones to unknown burial. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 599
Hale strength, nor from my bones all marrow drain'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 614
To see scull, coffin'd bones , and funeral stole; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 356
God rest her aged bones somewhere- Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 29
"And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by." Shakspeare O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 2
Her lips - I swear no human bones e'er wore Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 71
My parents' bones are in their dusty urns Lamia, Part II, Line 94
Will parch for lack of nutrient - thy bones The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 110
And many on their marrow- bones for death prepared. The Jealousies, Line 684
 
BONNETS...........1
For two or three bonnets Two or three posies, Line 26
 
BONY..............1
Or tear me piece-meal with a bony saw, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 263
 
BOOK..............25
A little book ,- and then a joy awakes To My Brother George (epistle), Line 94
And Archimago leaning o'er his book : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 37
Will be elysium - an eternal book Sleep and Poetry, Line 64
Of one who leans upon a closed book ; Sleep and Poetry, Line 262
Some precious book from out its snug retreat, Sleep and Poetry, Line 325
And in his lap a book , the which he conn'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 214
To search the book , and in the warming air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 677
O thou whose only book has been the light O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 5
Her book a churchyard tomb. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 8
A book There was a naughty boy, Line 7
Who keepeth clos'd a wond'rous riddle- book , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 130
And slant book full against the glare. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 72
Studied from that old spirit-leaved book Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 133
And the which book ye know I ever kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 137
Who vexes all the leaves of his life's book , On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 3
Though my name perish from the book of honour, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 265
"Philostratus, in his fourth book de Vita Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
And legend-leaved book , mysterious to behold. The Jealousies, Line 513
"Take this same book ,- it will not bite you, sire; The Jealousies, Line 514
"What shall I do with this same book ?" "Why merely The Jealousies, Line 523
Too tight,- the book !- my wand!- so, nothing is forgot." The Jealousies, Line 549
Under one arm the magic book he bore, The Jealousies, Line 606
Well, let us see,- tenth book and chapter nine,- The Jealousies, Line 640
To the second chapter of my fortieth book , The Jealousies, Line 706
And made him read in many a learned book , In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 4
 
BOOKS.............5
When at night-fall among your books we got: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 118
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books , and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
As may be read of in Arcadian books ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 140
Before high piled books , in charactry, When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 3
In Council, dreams too much among his books . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 32
 
BOOM..............1
Damp awe assail'd me; for there 'gan to boom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 484
 
BOOMING...........1
Came booming thus, while still upon his arm Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 307
 
BOON..............13
Love this boon has sent; Hither, hither, love, Line 22
Trees old, and young sprouting a shady boon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 14
With daily boon of fish most delicate: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 369
Only I pray, as fairest boon , to die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 550
To-morrow will I ask my lady's boon ."- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 28
Of thee we now should ask forgiving boon , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 146
As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 219
Of haggard seeming, but a boon indeed: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 344
Too great a boon ! I pr'ythee, let me ask Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 141
A boon Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 45b
If thou wilt, as thou swearest, grant my boon !" Lamia, Part I, Line 111
An immaterial wife to espouse as heaven's boon . The Jealousies, Line 27
"A simple boon !" said Elfinan, "thou may'st The Jealousies, Line 364
 
BOOT..............1
To boot - say, wretched ingrate, have I not Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 15
 
BOOTS.............1
And common Wellingtons turn Romeo boots ; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 8
 
BORDER............2
Around the western border of the wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 542
Upon a rock on the border of a lake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 27
 
BORE..............9
Each Atlas-line bore off!- a shine of hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 685
The teeming earth a sudden witness bore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 338
Endymion heard not: down his steed him bore , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 612
But we have many a horrid bore All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 7
He broke his sword, and hither bore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 51
But my own weak mortality, I bore The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 389
Upon their wings, they bore in bright array, The Jealousies, Line 35
My master finds a monstrous horrid bore ; The Jealousies, Line 285
Under one arm the magic book he bore , The Jealousies, Line 606
 
BOREAS............1
Antagonizing Boreas ,- and so vanish'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 531
 
BORN..............45
Thy heaven- born radiance around me shed, To Hope, Line 23
Like twin water lillies, born Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 33
But strength alone though of the Muses born Sleep and Poetry, Line 241
Born of the very sigh that silence heaves: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 12
Was there a Poet born ?- but now no more, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 241
Born of the gentle south, and clears away After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 3
This sweetest day for dalliance was born ; Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 15
Oh! 'twas born to die. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 8
Than those of sea- born Venus, when she rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 626
And never can be born of atomies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 851
And like a new- born spirit did he pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 70
A mad-pursuing of the fog- born elf, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 277
Of which the throbs were born . This still alarm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 357
By telling how the sea- born goddess pin'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 458
Lay sorrowing; when every tear was born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 467
The endless sleep of this new- born Adon', Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 554
With new- born life! What shall I do? Where go, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 239
To me new born delights! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 472a
Against that hell- born Circe. The crew had gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 665
Shouted the new born god; "Follow, and pay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 807
The ooze- born Goddess beckoned and drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 893
O first- born on the mountains! by the hues Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 2
Grief born of thee, young angel! fairest thief! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 108
For the first time, since he came nigh dead born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 371
Of new- born woe it feels more inly smart: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 519
Truth the best music in a first- born song. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 773
And a sad ditty of this story born Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 501
Toward the castle or the cot where long ago was born There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 11
Here, your earth- born souls still speak Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 29
"O brightest of my children dear, earth- born Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 309
I saw my first- born tumbled from his throne! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 323
Asia, born of most enormous Caf, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 53
The first- born of all shap'd and palpable Gods, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 153
Then thou first- born , and we the giant-race, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 200
A power more strong in beauty, born of us Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 213
And Phorcus, sea- born , and together strode Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 385
Of loveliness new born ."- Apollo then, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 79
O latest born and loveliest vision far Ode to Psyche, Line 24
A very gipsey is she, Nilus born , On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 9
Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 61
A wide world, where a thousand new- born hopes Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 181
But weep, and weep, that they were born so fair? Lamia, Part I, Line 62
A full- born beauty new and exquisite? Lamia, Part I, Line 172
Poison, as every staunch true- born Imaian ought. The Jealousies, Line 81
She was born at midnight in an Indian wild; The Jealousies, Line 390
 
BORNE.............11
And, but from the deep cavern there was borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 199
Blue heaven, and a silver car, air- borne , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 518
Thy forehead, and to Jupiter cloud- borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 654
To cloud- borne Jove he bowed, and there crost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 657
O shell- borne Neptune, I am pierc'd and stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 238
O shell- borne King sublime! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 965
"Alas!" said he, "were I but always borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 615
Too heavy to be borne . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 139a
Cried, "Lycius! gentle Lycius!"- Borne aloft Lamia, Part I, Line 168
Among the river sallows, borne aloft To Autumn, Line 28
Borne upon wings,- and very pleased she feels The Jealousies, Line 593
 
BORROW............8
Let me awhile thy sweetest comforts borrow : To Hope, Line 22
'Tis perhaps as well that it should be to borrow Sleep and Poetry, Line 324
"Now let me borrow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 472b
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 147
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 153
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 159
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 165
Out of the amorous dark what day doth borrow . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 206
 
BOSOM.............28
Should e'er unhappy love my bosom pain, To Hope, Line 25
A dove-like bosom . In truth there is no freeing Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 36
And all the clouds, and felt his bosom clean Sleep and Poetry, Line 42
Till in the bosom of a leafy world Sleep and Poetry, Line 119
Bared its eternal bosom , and the dew Sleep and Poetry, Line 190
E'en now all tumult from my bosom fades: Sleep and Poetry, Line 315
From my glad bosom - now from gloominess To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 2
To whose cool bosom she was used to bring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 433
All through my bosom : thou art as a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 467
Upon thy vaporous bosom , magnified Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 19
Into the gentle bosom of thy love. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 127
Into my bosom , that the dreadful might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 173
His bosom grew, when first he, far away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 244
Into the bosom of a hated thing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 280
Onward he goes - he stops - his bosom beats Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 355
Of Jove - Minerva's start - no bosom shook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 791
I know thine inmost bosom , and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 293
I met thee in earth's bosom , all my power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 905
Of thy capacious bosom ever flow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 950
To twinkle on my bosom ? No one dies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 49
Her gentle bosom heave tumultuously. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 100
Thine own fair bosom , and I am so near! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 317
And put it in her bosom , where it dries Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 372
The Stranger next with head on bosom bent Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 6
So far into your bosom - gentle maid Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 36
Away from my own bosom : I have left Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 113
Baptis'd her in the bosom of the church, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 132
Close bosom -friend of the maturing sun; To Autumn, Line 2
 
BOSOM'S...........1
No cuirass glistens on my bosom's swell; Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 6
 
BOSOMER...........1
The bosomer of clouds gold, grey, and dun. Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 4
 
BOSOMS............2
And panting bosoms bare! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 985
Into the verdurous bosoms of those isles. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 58
 
BOSWELL'S.........1
(Much like our Boswell's ), we will take a glance The Jealousies, Line 634
 
BOT...............1
Bot I must tellen verilie The Eve of St. Mark, Line 111
 
BOTH..............32
Their woes gone by, and both to heaven upflown, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 149
Thus ended he, and both Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 710b
A copious spring; and both together dash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 919
Must do the thing, or both will be destroy'd."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 711
Had we both perish'd?"- "Look!" the sage replied, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 717
For both , for both my love is so immense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 96
For both, for both my love is so immense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 96
Their timid necks and tremble; so these both Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 328
No word return'd: both lovelorn, silent, wan, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 764
Be happy both of you! for I will pull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 813
I do love you both together! Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 4
Both together, sane and mad; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 19
Both together,- let me slake Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 28
Both turning many a mill, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 9
With both our hearts a beating. Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 12
Alas! when passion is both meek and wild! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 48
Mumchance art thou with both obliged to part. Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 14
Or discontent, perhaps from both ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 20
He cursed thee and thine, both house and land: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 102
Blissfully haven'd both from joy and pain; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 240
Drown both , and press them both against earth's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 145
Drown both, and press them both against earth's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 145
That did both drown and keep alive my ears. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 277
Of deities or mortals, or of both , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 6
Both for his sake and mine, and to make glad Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 69
I am no jealous fool to kill you both , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 87
Manacle them both ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 258b
Would you were both hears'd up in stifling lead! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
Of both the guarded nymph near-smiling on the green. Lamia, Part I, Line 125
"My silver planet, both of eve and morn! Lamia, Part II, Line 48
I heard, I look'd: two senses both at once The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 118
Both , prostrate on the carpet, ear by ear, The Jealousies, Line 336
 
BOTHER............1
Frill-rumpling elbows brew up many a bother , The Jealousies, Line 773
 
BOTTLE............2
As a bottle of whisk- I am as brisk, Line 2
His smelling- bottle ready for the allies; The Jealousies, Line 221
 
BOTTLED...........1
In youth thou enter'dst on glass bottled wall. To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 14
 
BOTTOM............3
And one's own image from the bottom peep? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 332
Its bottom will I strew with amber shells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 695
Pale limbs at bottom of a crystal well; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 364
 
BOUDOIR...........1
Picklock'd a faery's boudoir - now no king, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 37
 
BOUGH.............5
A willow- bough , distilling odorous dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 424
He spake, and, trembling like an aspen- bough , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 746
Upon a bough Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 85b
They hung his bridle on a topmost bough , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 95
On this flush pomgranate bough . Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 12
 
BOUGHS............21
Where woven boughs shut out the moon's bright ray, To Hope, Line 8
'Mongst boughs pavillion'd, where the deer's swift leap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 7
With the young ashen boughs , 'gainst which it rests, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 21
So did he feel, who pull'd the boughs aside, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 151
A little space, with boughs all woven round; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 166
Into o'erhanging boughs , and precious fruits. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 66
His quick gone love, among fair blossom'd boughs , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 375
Which we should see but for these darkening boughs , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 863
And breathe them sighingly among the boughs , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 952
O let me cool it the zephyr- boughs among! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 318
O Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 54
Next, on a dolphin, clad in laurel boughs , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1001
Through aged boughs , that yielded like the mist Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 156
We are such forest-trees, and our fair boughs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 224
While from beneath some cumbrous boughs hard by Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 45
When holy were the haunted forest boughs , Ode to Psyche, Line 38
Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 42
Ah, happy, happy boughs ! that cannot shed Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 21
There! yonder underneath the boughs I see Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 7
Of these dull boughs ,- this oven of dark thickets,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 20
Onward I look'd beneath the gloomy boughs , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 297
 
BOUGHT............1
Thy fate. Your safety I have bought to-day Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 141
 
BOULOGNE..........3
Glocester, no more: I will behold that Boulogne : King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 1
Of Stephen of Boulogne , our prisoner, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 25
To that crime-loving rebel; that Boulogne - King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 38
 
BOUND.............12
Preparing on his spell- bound prey to dart: To Hope, Line 16
Wild strains to which, spell- bound , the nightingales listened; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 30
Parting luxuriant curls;- and the swift bound Sleep and Poetry, Line 334
Surely the mind of man is closely bound Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 5
Unto our souls, and bound to us so fast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 31
And bound it round Endymion: then struck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 752
Beyond its proper bound , yet still confined,- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 79
Whanne thate hir friendes thinke hem bound The Eve of St. Mark, Line 101
The Titans fierce, self-hid, or prison- bound , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 161
She will be bound with garlands of her own. If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 14
The Titans fierce, self-hid, or prison- bound , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 10
If impious prince no bound or limit kept, The Jealousies, Line 13
 
BOUNDARIES........1
Upon the boundaries of day and night, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 303
 
BOUNDARY..........1
Who lives beyond earth's boundary , grief is dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 620
 
BOUNDLESS.........1
Into the vaulted, boundless emerald. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 812
 
BOUNDLY...........1
My boundly reverence, that I cannot trace Sleep and Poetry, Line 209
 
BOUNDS............3
Far from the narrow bounds of thy dominions. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 106
How "love doth know no fulness nor no bounds ." Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 12
My happy love will overwing all bounds ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 814
 
BOUNTIES..........2
On all the many bounties of your hand,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 113
Of your large bounties . A tourney, is it not? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
 
BOUNTY............2
Great bounty from Endymion our lord. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 219
They knew not whence this bounty , and elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 370
 
BOURN.............5
And over the bourn to Dawlish- Over the hill and over the dale, Line 2
In happiness to see beyond our bourn - Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 83
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
His spirit pass'd beyond its golden bourn Lamia, Part II, Line 32
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn ; To Autumn, Line 30
 
BOURNE............3
Conception to the very bourne of heaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 295
In water, fiery realm, and airy bourne ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 31
Upon the bourne of bliss, but misery?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 461
 
BOW...............30
Nor bow thy pretty head to fly. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 4
That whining boyhood should with reverence bow Sleep and Poetry, Line 273
To bow for gratitude before Jove's throne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 150
God of the golden bow , God of the golden bow, Line 1
Uplifting his strong bow into the air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 345
From the exaltation of Apollo's bow ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 353
The fair-grown yew tree, for a chosen bow : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 482
Thy deathful bow against some deer-herd bent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 511
A cloudy Cupid, with his bow and quiver; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 889
Where with thy silver bow and arrows keen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 304
No sight can bear the lightning of his bow ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 538
A vivid lightning from that dreadful bow . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 584
I bow full hearted to your old decree! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 252
As large, as bright, as colour'd as the bow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 850
Thee the waves awful bow . Fast, stubborn rock, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 946
No, nor the Eolian twang of Love's own bow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 973
He tries the nerve of Phoebus' golden bow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 411
Some enemy: far forth his bow is bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 598
Bent his soul fiercely like a spiritual bow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 847
Her lucid bow , continuing thus: "Drear, drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 988
And the twanging bow no more; Robin Hood, Line 12
Honour to the old bow -string! Robin Hood, Line 50
"To-morrow will I bow to my delight, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 27
When to the folks thou mad'st a bow All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 23
A viol, bow strings torn, cross-wise upon Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 40
Spirit! I bow Spirit here that reignest, Line 5
Went trickling down the golden bow he held. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 43
Could bend that bow heroic to all times. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 75
Make your best bow to her and bid adieu; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 13
Bow like some unknown mercenary's flag Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 69
 
BOW'D.............16
And airy cradle, lowly bow'd his face Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 337
I bow'd a tranced vassal: nor would thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 460
Sighing, an elephant appear'd and bow'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 537
And the great Sea-King bow'd his dripping head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 890
She bow'd into the heavens her timid head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 502
Danae's Son, before Jove newly bow'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 606
Bow'd a fair greeting to these serpents' whine; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 190
While his bow'd head seem'd list'ning to the Earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 20
Some wept, some wail'd, all bow'd with reverence; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 112
Are bow'd before the mitre. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 61a
In silks with spangles shower'd, and bow'd to Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 89
From weary tendrils, and bow'd branches green, Lamia, Part I, Line 98
While his bow'd head seem'd listening to the Earth, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 325
That, on a court day bow'd to haughty Maud, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 29
He bow'd at Bellanaine, and said- "Poor Bell! The Jealousies, Line 609
Bow'd low with high demeanour, and, to pay The Jealousies, Line 741
 
BOWED.............2
To cloud-borne Jove he bowed , and there crost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 657
With bowed necks, and joined hands, side-faced; Ode on Indolence, Line 2
 
BOWER.............25
And hastest thou now to that fair lady's bower ? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 16
Came chaste Diana from her shady bower , To George Felton Mathew, Line 79
Clear was the song from Philomel's far bower ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 154
And buzzes cheerily from bower to bower? Sleep and Poetry, Line 4
And buzzes cheerily from bower to bower ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 4
A bower for his spirit, and will steer On The Story of Rimini, Line 12
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 4
But renovates and lives?- Thus, in the bower , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 463
Its airy goal, haply some bower veils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 192
Over a bower , where little space he stood; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 381
And virgin's bower , trailing airily; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 417
It was a jasmine bower , all bestrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 670
Of green or silvery bower doth enshrine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 73
No woods were green enough, no bower divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 151
"When I awoke, 'twas in a twilight bower ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 418
Shed balmy consciousness within that bower . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 466
Towards a crystal bower far away. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1018
Held sacred for thy bower , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 171
Let my bower be of yew, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 30
The stranger walk'd into the bower ,- Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 9
Aye hand in hand into the bower , Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 11
Close in a bower of hyacinth and musk, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 85
Hath fled to her bower , well knowing I want Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 14
And his twin-sister sleeping in their bower , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 32
Wind into Thetis' bower by many a pearly stair; Lamia, Part I, Line 208
 
BOWER'S...........2
Under her favorite bower's quiet shade, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 437
Thus violate thy bower's sanctity! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 106
 
BOWERED...........1
My terrace is well bowered with oranges. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 34
 
BOWERS............16
Which round its marge reflected woven bowers , Imitation of Spenser, Line 8
In Spenser's halls he strayed, and bowers fair, Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 9
Yet further off, are dimly seen their bowers , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 43
That gave soft music from Armida's bowers , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 31
With streams that deepen freshly into bowers . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 48
Young goddess! let me see my native bowers ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 331
Presents immortal bowers to mortal sense; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 438
Why have ye left your bowers desolate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 220
For all the golden bowers of the day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 564
And let me see thy bowers God of the meridian, Line 24
Even bees, the little almsmen of spring- bowers , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 103
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 219
Dazzling bowers of soft retire, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 6
And twilight your floating bowers . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 100
And show to common eyes these secret bowers ? Lamia, Part II, Line 149
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 55
 
BOWERY............8
Of this sweet spot of earth. The bowery shore Calidore: A Fragment, Line 26
Visions of all places: a bowery nook Sleep and Poetry, Line 63
Or by the bowery clefts, and leavy shelves, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 21
And moisture, that the bowery green may live: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 84
Towards a bowery island opposite; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 428
Of secret grief, here in this bowery nest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 539
Fresh breezes, bowery lawns, and innocent floods, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 967
The dull shell's echo, from a bowery strand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 274
 
BOWING............2
Bowing her head, and ready to expire: To Hope, Line 40
stage, bowing with respect to LUDOLPH, he frowning on them. CONRAD follows. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
 
BOWL..............3
Fill for me a brimming bowl , Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 1
My bowl is the sky, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 7
He 'sdeign'd the swine-herd at the wassel bowl , Character of C.B., Line 13
 
BOWS..............4
O Moon! far-spooming Ocean bows to thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 70
When these words reach'd him. Whereupon he bows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 40
Bows down his summer head below the west. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 930
Over the pathless waves towards him bows . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 96
 
BOWSE.............1
Sup and bowse from horn and can. Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 12
 
BOWSTRING.........1
And the dull twanging bowstring , and the raft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 334
 
BOWSTRUNG.........1
Though I have bowstrung many of his sect; The Jealousies, Line 193
 
BOX...............1
Her work- box , and 'twill help your purpose dearly; The Jealousies, Line 525
 
BOY...............29
Of the aspiring boy ; who as he led Calidore: A Fragment, Line 128
A laughing school- boy , without grief or care, Sleep and Poetry, Line 94
The chantry boy sings, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 10
The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
So reaching back to boy -hood: make me ships Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 881
For the boy Jupiter: and here, undimm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 449
A gentle girl and boy - In drear nighted December, Line 18
There was a naughty boy There was a naughty boy, Line 1
A naughty boy was he There was a naughty boy, Line 2
There was a naughty boy There was a naughty boy, Line 26
And a naughty boy was he There was a naughty boy, Line 27
There was a naughty boy There was a naughty boy, Line 59
And a naughty boy was he There was a naughty boy, Line 60
There was a naughty boy There was a naughty boy, Line 92
And a naughty boy was he There was a naughty boy, Line 93
A cave of young earth dragons - well, my boy , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 55
The winged boy I knew; Ode to Psyche, Line 21
But makes surrender to some thoughtless boy , On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 3
A potent tutoress to my wayward boy , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 32
O 'tis a noble boy !- tut!- what do I say? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
No, obstinate boy , you shall be kept cag'd up, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 88
You are a most perplexing noble boy . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 112
E'en to her chamber-door, and there, fair boy ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Your wrath, weak boy ? Tremble at mine, unless Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
Which way went they, boy ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 132b
Miss'd the way, boy ? Say not that on your peril! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 16
O, my poor boy ! My son! My son! My Ludolph! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 1
Console my poor boy , cheer him, heal his spirits? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 14
Open it straight;- hush!- quiet!- my lost boy ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 37
 
BOYHOOD...........3
That whining boyhood should with reverence bow Sleep and Poetry, Line 273
Yes, in my boyhood , every joy and pain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 160
Of an aspiring life! My boyhood past Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 9
 
BOYISH............2
Through the old garden-ground of boyish days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 784
'Twas done in memory of my boyish days, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 40
 
BOYS..............1
My children fair, my lovely girls and boys ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 547


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Published @ RC

March 2005