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Keats Concordance
 
BROAD.............17
Broad leav'd are they and their white canopies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 22
And the broad winged sea-gull never at rest; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 136
To mark the time as they grow broad , and shorter; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 89
And now broad wings. Most awfully intent, Sleep and Poetry, Line 151
A butterfly, with golden wings broad parted, Sleep and Poetry, Line 343
Heaves calmly its broad swelling smoothness o'er Sleep and Poetry, Line 377
Broad leaved fig trees even now foredoom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 252
Heave his broad shoulder o'er the edge of the world, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 530
When from the sun was thy broad forehead hid? To Ailsa Rock, Line 4
Behind a broad hall-pillar, far beyond The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 94
Broad golden fringe upon the carpet lies: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 285
Circles, and arcs, and broad -belting colure, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 274
Then with a slow incline of his broad breast, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 354
'Twill be impossible, while the broad day Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 24
The old man through the inner doors broad -spread; Lamia, Part II, Line 170
'Cross the broad table, to beseech a glance Lamia, Part II, Line 243
For the broad marble knees; and who thou art, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 214
 
BROADEST..........1
Shed from the broadest of her elephants. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 63
 
BROIDER'D.........1
Whereon were broider'd tigers with black eyes, The Jealousies, Line 447
 
BROIDERED.........1
Of thy broidered , floating vest Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 45
 
BROIDERIES........2
Spangled, and rich with liquid broideries Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 619
Among its golden broideries ; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 28
 
BROIDERY..........2
Her playmates, with their needle broidery , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 434
She spoilt her half-done broidery with the same. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 16
 
BROIL.............1
Light, the first fruits of that intestine broil , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 192
 
BROILS............1
So, I am safe emerged from these broils ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 1
 
BROKE.............5
Broke through the careful silence; for they heard Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 495
He broke his sword, and hither bore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 51
Broke short in his hand; upon which he flung King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 40
Kill'd a man-cook, a page, and broke a jar, The Jealousies, Line 669
Far in the west a mighty fire broke out- The Jealousies, Line 677
 
BROKEN............4
Made silken ties, that never may be broken . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 238
That our heart- broken parting is so nigh. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 584
'Tis not confiding in a broken reed, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 33
Urging the perfidy of broken faith,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 148
 
BRONZ'D...........1
But as a son. The bronz'd centurion, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 25
 
BRONZE............1
Bronze clarions awake, and faintly bruit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 791
 
BRONZED...........3
Through bronzed lyre in tragic order go, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 443
And touch'd with shade of bronzed obelisks, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 178
And touch'd with shade of bronzed obelisks, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 26
 
BROOD.............12
Of my delighted fancy,- I could brood How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 3
A money mong'ring, pitiable brood . Addressed to Haydon, Line 8
Sit ye near some old cavern's mouth and brood On the Sea, Line 13
And we are nurtured like a pelican brood . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 815
To brood so long upon one luxury, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 855
Are things to brood on with more ardency Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 33
'Mong lilies, like the youngest of the brood . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 100
In which whales harbour close, to brood and sulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 882
But one of the whole mammoth- brood still kept Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 164
Is Thea, softest-natur'd of our brood ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 335
But one of our whole eagle- brood still keeps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 13
Here comes the testy brood . O for a sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 5
 
BROODED...........3
Who brooded o'er the water in amaze: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 132
She brooded o'er the luxury alone: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 236
Whose heart had brooded , all that wintry day, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 43
 
BROODEST..........1
That broodest o'er the troubled sea of the mind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 454
 
BROODING..........1
Still brooding o'er the cadence of his lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 456
 
BROODS............1
Upon a time, before the faery broods Lamia, Part I, Line 1
 
BROOK.............13
A little brook . The youth had long been viewing Calidore: A Fragment, Line 52
Who had beheld Belphoebe in a brook , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 35
And fresh from the clear brook ; sweetly they slept I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 9
O let me lead her gently o'er the brook , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 101
In the middle of a brook ,- whose silver ramble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 933
Too happy, happy brook , In drear nighted December, Line 10
Pass by unheeded as a threshold brook . Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 12
There's Arch Brook For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 7
And there's Larch Brook , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 8
To the brook There was a naughty boy, Line 73
His lady's purpose; and he scarce could brook The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 133
So far her voice flow'd on, like timorous brook Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 300
Steady thy laden head across a brook ; To Autumn, Line 20
 
BROOKLET..........1
A brooklet , scarce espied: Ode to Psyche, Line 12
 
BROOKLETS.........1
Who dances on bubbles where brooklets meet- Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 6
 
BROOKS............3
Empty of all misfortune? Do the brooks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 128
And where the very brooks as if afraid When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 7
But after water- brooks this pilgrim's soul Character of C.B., Line 16
 
BROOM.............1
Her currants pods o' broom , Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 6
 
BROOMS............1
For wine we left our heath, and yellow brooms , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 233
 
BROTH.............1
And made a very tolerable broth - The Jealousies, Line 651
 
BROTHER...........20
Than that in which the brother Poets joy'd, To George Felton Mathew, Line 5
And warm thy sons!" Ah, my dear friend and brother , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 109
And earnestly said: " Brother , 'tis vain to hide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 505
Brother of Jove, and co-inheritor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 944
And her brother , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 289
Crystalline brother of the belt of heaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 581
Thy lute-voic'd brother will I sing ere long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 774
"Dear brother mine! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 804b
This wayward brother to his rightful joys! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 842
To lure - Endymion, dear brother , say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 845
Her brother kiss'd her too, and knelt adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 998
Then came his brother Rab and then Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 21
A younger brother this! a man O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 67
Our brightest brother , still is undisgraced- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 344
Can it be, brother ? For a golden crown Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 88
More than a brother of a sister ought, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 146
Or friend,- or brother ,- or all ties of blood,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 64
Auranthe! and her brother there- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 165a
Your pardon, brother , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 17b
"I'll shirk the Duke of A.; I'll cut his brother ; The Jealousies, Line 154
 
BROTHER'S.........6
To meet her glorious brother's greeting beam. To George Felton Mathew, Line 83
A very brother's yearning for thee steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 294
But there is crime - a brother's bloody knife! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 333
Of brother's eyes, of sister's brow, constant to every place; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 34
O, that my brother's daughter should so fall! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 149
My sickness, with a brother's sadden'd eye, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 71
 
BROTHERHOOD.......4
And doubly sweet a brotherhood in song; To George Felton Mathew, Line 2
That smooth the path of honour; brotherhood , Sleep and Poetry, Line 317
And surety give to love and brotherhood . Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 9
Among the brotherhood ; and, at their glare, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 383
 
BROTHERLY.........1
On heaven's pavement; brotherly he talks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 408
 
BROTHERS..........7
Among his brothers of the mountain chase. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 192
"We are twin brothers in this destiny! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 713
With her two brothers this fair lady dwelt, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 105
So the two brothers and their murder'd man Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 209
She ask'd her brothers , with an eye all pale, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 258
Her brothers were the craggy hills, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 9
Of reverend brothers ; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 94
 
BROTHERS'.........1
The brothers' faces in the ford did seem, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 214
 
BROUGHT...........22
Had brought me a gem from the fret-work of heaven; To Some Ladies, Line 18
They brought their happy burthens. What a kiss, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 80
Than if I'd brought to light a hidden treasure. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 116
And brought in faintness solemn, sweet, and slow I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 196
Even while they brought the burden to a close, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 307
Mark me, Peona! that sometimes it brought Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 689
Oft have I brought thee flowers, on their stalks set Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 873
Tracing along, it brought me to a cave, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 935
Had he, though blindly contumelious, brought Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 285
For thou hast brought their promise to an end. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 688
Or is it that imagination brought Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 78
Yet brought him to the meekness of a child: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 47
Gold, black, and heavy, from the lama brought . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 64
While he from forth the closet brought a heap The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 264
Prythee, fair lady, what chance brought you here? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
Hast brought pollution to our holy rites? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 58
That your knight Albert be brought here before you. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 189
But pale, as if you brought some heavy news. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 111
She shall be brought before this company, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 97
That pestilence brought in,- that cannot be, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 101
In baskets of bright osier'd gold were brought Lamia, Part II, Line 217
"Five minutes before one - brought down a moth The Jealousies, Line 649
 
BROW..............34
Soothing with placid brow our late distress, On Peace, Line 3
And his dark brow for very wrath is knit? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 26
Over a knightly brow ; while they went by Calidore: A Fragment, Line 131
Of Jove's large eye- brow , to the tender greening Sleep and Poetry, Line 170
From off her brow , and left her all alone. Sleep and Poetry, Line 384
To tie for a moment thy plant round his brow , God of the golden bow, Line 32
By thy love's milky brow ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 244
Her pearl round ears, white neck, and orbed brow ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 616
Was in his plaited brow : yet, his eyelids Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 762
A scowl is sometimes on his brow , but who Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 542
Their surly eyes brow -hidden, heavy paws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 645
Sleep will come smoothly to my weary brow . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 236
A clammy dew is beading on my brow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 568
Where shall our dwelling be? Under the brow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 670
And earnest a kiss on the brow , Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 6
Of brother's eyes, of sister's brow , constant to every place; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 34
Whisper'd I and touch'd his brow . Not Aladdin magian, Line 20
Flushing his brow , and in his pained heart The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 137
Of Saturn; tell me, if this wrinkling brow , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 100
I see a lily on thy brow La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 9
It was my chance to meet his olive brow , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 54
Look at the Emperor's brow upon me bent! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 62
A foolish dream that from my brow hath wrung Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 221
Put on a judge's brow , and use a tongue Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 147
Stoop, Hermes, let me breathe upon thy brow , Lamia, Part I, Line 121
Not in your heart while care weighs on your brow : Lamia, Part II, Line 43
In one whose brow had no dark veins to swell. Lamia, Part II, Line 77
Brow -beating her fair form, and troubling her sweet pride. Lamia, Part II, Line 248
And chiefly of the veils, that from her brow The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 252
So at the view of sad Moneta's brow , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 275
Not twenty Earls of Chester shall brow -beat King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 35
Talks off the mighty frowning from his brow , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 43
Plaited upon his furnace-scorched brow : The Jealousies, Line 508
"Behold, your Majesty, upon the brow The Jealousies, Line 543
 
BROW'D............2
That deep- brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 6
Not grey- brow'd like the poisonous Ethelbert, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
 
BROWLESS..........1
With browless idiotism - o'erweening phlegm- To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 12
 
BROWN.............7
The freedom of three steeds of dapple brown : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 167
With silvery oak apples, and fir cones brown - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 276
Along the flat brown sand. I was at home, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 92
Her bed it was the brown heath turf, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 3
And with her fingers old and brown Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 21
Peel'd the brown hazel twig to lilly white, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 42
Shaded his deep green eyes, and wrinkles brown The Jealousies, Line 507
 
BROWS.............16
Spenser! thy brows are arched, open, kind, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 49
With leaves about their brows ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 292
Lies a deep hollow, from whose ragged brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 864
He woke as from a trance; his snow-white brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 221
He mark'd their brows and foreheads; saw their hair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 741
And pluck the sorrow from our huntsmen's brows . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 840
Her eye- brows thin and jet, and hollow eyes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 115
That was before our brows were taught to frown, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 339
From your alert eyes and high-lifted brows . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 18
Who eas'd the crownet from your infant brows , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 135
May burst, and swell, and flourish round thy brows , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 30
Sullen against the wind! If in two angry brows Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 58
How dar'st thou lift those beetle brows at me? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
Completed by her twin-arch'd ebon- brows ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 63
Might fancy-fit his brows , silk-pillow'd at his ease. Lamia, Part II, Line 220
Lifted his eye- brows , spurn'd the path beneath, The Jealousies, Line 273
 
BROWS'D...........1
Brows'd by none but Dian's fawns; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 12
 
BROWSE............1
Their baaing vanities, to browse away Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 3
 
BRUISE............1
Where other hearts are sick of the same bruise ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 104
 
BRUISED...........4
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 4
Is bruised by the Hungarian petards. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 9
The bruised remnants of our stricken camp Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 127
Now may we lift our bruised visors up, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 1
 
BRUIT.............1
Bronze clarions awake, and faintly bruit , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 791
 
BRUNSWICK.........1
And Anthony resides in Brunswick Square. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 10
 
BRUSH.............6
Oh brush not yet the pearl strung spray, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 3
Fair dewy roses brush against our faces, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 133
Past them, but he must brush on every side. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 868
Schooling its half-fledg'd little ones to brush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 130
A hair brush There was a naughty boy, Line 13
No brush had touch'd his chin or razor sheer; Character of C.B., Line 7
 
BRUSH'D...........1
Came sudden 'fore my face, and brush'd against my hat. The Jealousies, Line 675
 
BRUSHES...........1
Cowering their tawny brushes . Silent sails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 647
 
BRUSHING..........3
Brushing , awakened: then the sounds again Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 379
Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 110
Round bush and tree, soft- brushing , in his speed, Lamia, Part I, Line 43
 
BRUTE.............1
And all around her shapes, wizard and brute , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 500
 
BRUTISHNESS.......1
That all his brutishness he quite forsook, In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 7
 
BRUTUS............2
The hand of Brutus , that so grandly fell To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 71
And Junius Brutus pretty well so so, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 11
 
BUBBLE............2
I'd bubble up the water through a reed; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 880
Of mitigation, or redeeming bubble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 641
 
BUBBLED...........1
Meander gave me,- for I bubbled up Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 118
 
BUBBLES...........9
Bubbles a pipe; fine sounds are floating wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 228
While at our feet, the voice of crystal bubbles I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 137
He's gone - up bubbles all his amorous breath. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 14
To warm their chilliest bubbles in the grass; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 103
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth; Fancy, Line 4
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth. Fancy, Line 78
Who dances on bubbles where brooklets meet- Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 6
Lift their eyes above the bubbles , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 36
With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 17
 
BUBBLING..........4
Two bubbling springs of talk from their sweet lips. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 738
Shone like the bubbling foam about a keel Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 354
Cold as a bubbling well; let faint-lipp'd shells, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 19
Came, as through bubbling honey, for Love's sake, Lamia, Part I, Line 65
 
BUBBLINGS.........2
With mingled bubblings and a gentle rush, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 420
Thy bubblings ne'er remember In drear nighted December, Line 11
 
BUCKLED...........1
Buckled and tied with many a twist and plait? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 88
 
BUD...............4
A bud which snares his fancy: lo! but now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 57
My river-lily bud ! one human kiss! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 664
A kiss should bud upon the tree of love, Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 8
As though a rose should shut, and be a bud again. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 243
 
BUD'S.............1
And the green bud's as long as the spike end. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 36
 
BUDDED............7
Of flowers budded newly; and the dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 91
Budded , and swell'd, and, full-blown, shed full showers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 799
Where thou didst dream alone on budded bays, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 3
Will sear my plumage newly budded Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 25
Blue, silver-white, and budded Tyrian, Ode to Psyche, Line 14
Faded the flower and all its budded charms, The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 5
Let none else touch the just new- budded flower; To Fanny, Line 54
 
BUDDERS...........1
Now while the early budders are just new, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 41
 
BUDDING...........8
Budding - fruit ripening in stillness - autumn suns After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 10
Their freckled wings; yea, the fresh budding year Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 259
Not flowers budding in an April rain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 971
From budding at the prime. In drear nighted December, Line 8
I cannot look on any budding flower, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 9
There is a budding morrow in midnight, To Homer, Line 11
Let in the budding warmth and throstle's lay; Ode on Indolence, Line 48
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, To Autumn, Line 8
 
BUDGE.............3
And rub your flinty back against it - budge ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 50
Do it, De Kaims, I will not budge an inch. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 18
An inch appears the utmost thou couldst budge ; The Jealousies, Line 245
 
BUDS..............17
Outvieing all the buds in Flora's diadem. Imitation of Spenser, Line 36
With its own drooping buds , but very white; To George Felton Mathew, Line 44
Wreather of poppy buds , and weeping willows! Sleep and Poetry, Line 14
Breath of new buds unfolding? From the meaning Sleep and Poetry, Line 169
That the sweet buds which with a modest pride I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 3
Of buds into ripe flowers; or by the flitting I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 111
Buds lavish gold; or ye, whose precious charge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 203
Dew-drops, and dewy buds , and leaves, and flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 900
In pity of the shatter'd infant buds ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 923
It swells, it buds , it flowers beneath his sight; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 59
All the buds and bells of May, Fancy, Line 33
With buds , and bells, and stars without a name, Ode to Psyche, Line 61
Young buds sleep in the root's white core. Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 4
Strength to thy virgin crownet's golden buds , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 28
Still buds the tree, and still the sea-shores murmur. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 422
As daisies lurk'd in June-grass, buds in treen; The Jealousies, Line 347
Buds gather'd from the green spring's middle-days, The Jealousies, Line 727
 
BUFFETING.........1
And eagles struggle with the buffeting north Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 643
 
BUFFETS...........1
Do ye forget the blows, the buffets vile? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 317
 
BUGBEAR...........1
What is the monstrous bugbear that can fright King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 20
 
BUGLE.............6
Was hung a silver bugle , and between Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 173
Of velvet leaves and bugle -blooms divine; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 414
He blows a bugle ,- an ethereal band Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 420
Whose bugle ?" he inquires: they smile - "O Dis! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 427
No, the bugle sounds no more, Robin Hood, Line 11
Honour to the bugle -horn! Robin Hood, Line 51
 
BUILD.............2
Yes, I will be thy priest, and build a fane Ode to Psyche, Line 50
And thus a marble column do I build Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 160
 
BUILDED...........2
Builded so high, it seem'd that filmed clouds The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 63
Like sculpture builded up upon the grave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 383
 
BUILDING..........1
Part of the building was a chosen see Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 41
 
BUILDINGS.........2
Of murky buildings ; climb with me the steep,- O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 3
From square to square, among the buildings raved, The Jealousies, Line 736
 
BUILT.............8
Nor knew that nests were built . Now a soft kiss- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 806
Built by a banish'd santon of Chaldee: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 42
Was built by Cuthbert de Saint Aldebrim; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 44
Built by a Lapland witch turn'd maudlin nun- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 46
Golden aisled, built up in heaven, Not Aladdin magian, Line 8
Or mountain- built with peaceful citadel, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 36
That royal porch, that high- built fair demesne; Lamia, Part II, Line 155
Above a pearl- built minster, hovering near; The Jealousies, Line 579
 
BULK..............5
Of every shape and size, even to the bulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 881
Even for common bulk , those olden three, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 848
At this, through all his bulk an agony Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 259
Pouring a constant bulk , uncertain where. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 9
In midst of his own brightness, like the bulk Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 373
 
BULKY.............1
All its more ponderous and bulky worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 803
 
BULLION...........1
Bring forth once more my bullion , treasured deep, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11
 
BULRUSH...........1
Itself with dancing bulrush , and the bream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 212
 
BUMPER............2
Yet can I gulp a bumper to thy name,- This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 13
He fill'd a bumper . "Great sire, do not weep! The Jealousies, Line 425
 
BUNCH.............2
A bunch of violets full blown, and double, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 92
By any touch, a bunch of blooming plums Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 450
 
BUNCHED...........1
And cloister'd among cool and bunched leaves- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 829
 
BUNCHES...........1
Of fruits, and flowers, and bunches of knot-grass, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 210
 
BUNDLE............1
Take you a bundle of the largest pines, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 57
 
BUOYANT...........2
And buoyant round my limbs. At first I dwelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 384
The buoyant life of song can floating be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 352
 
BURDEN............4
Melting a burden dear, Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 11
Bearing the burden of a shepherd song; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 136
Even while they brought the burden to a close, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 307
Let us two a burden try. Robin Hood, Line 62
 
BURDEN'D..........1
Eas'd in one accent his o'er- burden'd soul, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 229
 
BURGUNDY..........1
Hence burgundy , claret, and port, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 1
 
BURIAL............3
Thy fragile bones to unknown burial . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 599
Such calm favonian burial ! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 11
Sure this should be some splendid burial . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Second Lady, Line 12
 
BURIED............11
One kiss brings honey-dew from buried days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 7
Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 73
Then all its buried magic, till it flush'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 900
Of buried griefs the spirit sees, but scarce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 517
And their minutes buried all Robin Hood, Line 3
There was Lorenzo slain and buried in, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 217
A buried miser's only son, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 74
And buried from all godlike exercise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 107
And see my cool sedge- buried urn, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 32
Up the hill-side; and now 'tis buried deep Ode to a Nightingale, Line 77
And buried from all godlike exercise The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 413
 
BURLY.............2
Hurly burly There was a naughty boy, Line 69
Your temper elsewhere, 'mong these burly tents, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
 
BURN..............16
I hotly burn - to be a Calidore - Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 12
Yet do I often warmly burn to see Happy is England! I could be content, Line 12
Or of those silver lamps that burn on high, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 7
Smile, as if those words should burn me, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 22
And be a criminal. Alas, I burn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 963
As Pluto's sceptre, that my words not burn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 474
Just when the sufferer begins to burn , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 533
Must I burn through; once more humbly assay On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 7
Meadows sweet where flames burn under; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 8
My heart began to burn - and only pains, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 10
"Now ye are flames, I'll tell you how to burn , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 327
Terrier, ferret them out! Burn - burn the witch! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 138
Terrier, ferret them out! Burn - burn the witch! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 138
More than a fiery dragon, and did burn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 135
Let, let the amorous burn - To Fanny, Line 20
And take some more wine, Hum;- O, heavens! I burn The Jealousies, Line 530
 
BURN'D............2
Then faded, and to follow them I burn'd Ode on Indolence, Line 23
Dash'd by the wood-nymph's beauty, so he burn'd ; Lamia, Part I, Line 130
 
BURNETH...........2
While mine for passion burneth - You say you love; but with a voice, Line 19
Spirit here that burneth ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 3
 
BURNING...........9
And placid eye, young Calidore is burning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 142
And there in strife no burning thoughts to heed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 879
The burning prayer within him; so, bent low, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 546
But vain is now the burning , and the strife, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 28
A gentler speech from burning Porphyro; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 159
A burning forehead, and a parching tongue. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 30
Though bright Apollo's car stood burning here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
Burning ,- when suddenly a palsied chill The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 122
For by my burning brain I measured sure The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 393
 
BURNINGS..........1
For quenchless burnings come upon the heart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 844
 
BURNISH'D.........1
Tied in a burnish'd knot, their semblance took The Jealousies, Line 269
 
BURNS.............7
We well might drop a tear for him, and Burns . To George Felton Mathew, Line 71
Burns in thee, child?- What good can thee betide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 349
Cast wan upon it! Burns ! with honour due On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 12
Now fills, O Burns , a space in thine own room, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 2
Scorches and burns our once serene domain. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 63
Sepulchred, where no kindled incense burns , Lamia, Part II, Line 95
Scorches and burns our once serene domain. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 365
 
BURNT.............6
Soon they awoke clear eyed: nor burnt with thirsting, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 225
Am I to be burnt up? No, I will shout, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 267
Would offer a burnt sacrifice of verse Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 9
Burnt from his winged heels to either ear, Lamia, Part I, Line 23
Was none. She burnt , she lov'd the tyranny, Lamia, Part II, Line 81
Thy hour glass, if these gummed leaves be burnt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 116
 
BURR..............2
Holding his forehead, to keep off the burr Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 138
To this new-fangled vice, which seems a burr The Jealousies, Line 107
 
BURROWING.........1
Its strength for darkness, burrowing like the mole; Sonnet to Sleep, Line 12
 
BURRS.............1
Delight it; for it feeds upon the burrs , Sleep and Poetry, Line 244
 
BURST.............21
Keep thy chains burst , and boldly say thou art free; On Peace, Line 12
The names of heroes, burst from clouds concealing, To Kosciusko, Line 6
Ah! surely he had burst our mortal bars; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 190
But soon she came, with sudden burst , upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 503
That kept my spirit in are burst - that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 186
Moanings had burst from him; but now that rage Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 862
To burst with hoarest thunderings, and wipe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 348
Ere it burst open swift as fairy thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 857
To meet oblivion."- As her heart would burst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 124
Hedge-grown primrose that hath burst ; Fancy, Line 50
At length burst in the argent revelry, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 37
Burst the door open, quick - or I declare When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 16
Till his girths burst and left him naked stark When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 86
Clear'd them of heavy vapours, burst them wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 267
Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine; Ode on Melancholy, Line 28
May burst , and swell, and flourish round thy brows, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 30
Nothing? Her burst heart nothing? Emperor! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
Came jasper pannels; then, anon, there burst Lamia, Part II, Line 139
Can burst the meshes. Not the eagle more King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 29
And, ere one lively bead could burst and flit, The Jealousies, Line 419
A fan-shaped burst of blood-red, arrowy fire, The Jealousies, Line 663
 
BURSTING..........3
Nor with hot fingers, nor with temples bursting : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 226
But flowers bursting out with lusty pride, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 17
How was it nurtur'd to such bursting forth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 104
 
BURSTS............2
Of colours, wings, and bursts of spangly light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 569
Bursts gradual, with a wayward indolence. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 350
 
BURTHEN...........1
Still is the burthen sung - "O cruelty, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 503
 
BURTHENS..........2
They brought their happy burthens . What a kiss, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 80
And all its burthens . Gasping with despair The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 398
 
BURTON'S..........1
this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece." Burton's "Anatomy of Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
BURY..............1
To kill Lorenzo, and there bury him. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 176
 
BUSH..............2
A bush of May flowers with the bees about them; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 29
Round bush and tree, soft-brushing, in his speed, Lamia, Part I, Line 43
 
BUSHES............7
Among the bushes half leafless, and dry; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 2
A linnet starting all about the bushes : Sleep and Poetry, Line 342
Bushes and trees do lean all round athwart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 865
Right upward, through the bushes , to the sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 872
To the white rose bushes ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 150
Of death among the bushes and the leaves, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 253
She met among the bushes . Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 24
 
BUSHY.............1
Thin in the waist, with bushy head of hair, Character of C.B., Line 2
 
BUSIEST...........1
Were busiest , into that self-same lawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 108
 
BUSINESS..........1
"Gad! he's obliged to stick to business ! The Jealousies, Line 289
 
BUSS..............1
I must have one sweet buss - I must and shall! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 43
 
BUSTLE............2
In perilous bustle ; while upon the deck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 657
A hopeless bustle 'mid our swarming arms; King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 11
 
BUSTLING..........2
Of grass, a wailful gnat, a bee bustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 450
He sets his bustling household's wits at work King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 48
 
BUSTS.............2
In other ages - cold and sacred busts Sleep and Poetry, Line 357
Greek busts and statuary have ever been Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 55
 
BUSY..............11
As that of busy spirits when the portals Calidore: A Fragment, Line 159
Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid coals, To My Brothers, Line 1
Peona's busy hand against his lips, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 444
Or the rooks, with busy caw, Fancy, Line 45
So saying, she hobbled off with busy fear. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 181
O spectres busy in a cold, cold gloom! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 229
Or hear the voice of busy common-sense! Ode on Indolence, Line 40
Will leave this busy castle. You had best Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 172
Shut from the busy world of more incredulous. Lamia, Part I, Line 397
The herd approach'd; each guest, with busy brain, Lamia, Part II, Line 150
Our minute's glance; a busy thunderous roar, The Jealousies, Line 735
 
BUTTERFLIES.......5
Or June that breathes out life for butterflies ? To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 11
Their summer coolness: pent up butterflies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 258
Of careless butterflies : amid his pains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 765
King of the butterflies ; but by this gloom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 952
Plenty of posies, great stags, butterflies The Jealousies, Line 449
 
BUTTERFLY.........3
A butterfly , with golden wings broad parted, Sleep and Poetry, Line 343
A golden butterfly ; upon whose wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 61
Why, I have been a butterfly , a lord Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 937
 
BUTTOCKS..........1
O put it to her buttocks bare All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 11
 
BUTTRESS'D........2
Buttress'd from moonlight, stands he, and implores The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 77
Of grey cathedrals, buttress'd walls, rent towers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 67
 
BUTTS.............1
When butts of wine are drunk off to the lees? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 36
 
BUZZ..............4
Nor will a bee buzz round two swelling peaches, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 66
That buzz about our slumbers, like brain-flies, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 852
Buzz from their honied wings: and thou shouldst please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 997
Of Psyche given by Love, there was a buzz Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 29
 
BUZZ'D............2
He ventures in: let no buzz'd whisper tell: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 82
Hover'd and buzz'd his wings, with fearful roar, Lamia, Part II, Line 13
 
BUZZES............1
And buzzes cheerily from bower to bower? Sleep and Poetry, Line 4
 
BUZZING...........4
"Aye, but a buzzing by my ears has flown, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 875
For the buzzing bee, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 29
But left a thought, a buzzing in his head. Lamia, Part II, Line 29
Replied the page; "that little buzzing noise, The Jealousies, Line 330
 
BY'R..............1
" By'r Lady! he is gone!" cries Hum, "and I,- The Jealousies, Line 613
 
BYE...............5
His very goddess: good- bye earth, and sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 431
Good- bye to all but love! Then doth he spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 433
Good bye ! I'll soon be back."- "Good bye!" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
Good bye! I'll soon be back."- "Good bye !" said she:- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 207
Old Crafticant will smoke me, by-the- bye ! The Jealousies, Line 615
 
BYRON.............1
Byron , how sweetly sad thy melody, To Lord Byron, Line 1


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Published @ RC

March 2005