C-Ce - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
C.................1
Old Jonah went to C . O grant that like to Peter I, Line 4
 
CABBAGES..........1
It swallows cabbages without a spoon, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 11
 
CABINET...........2
A Cabinet , opening towards a Terrace. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Setting
Into his cabinet , and there did fling The Jealousies, Line 133
 
CABLE'S...........1
No, no, that horror cannot be - for at the cable's length There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 39
 
CADENCE...........1
Still brooding o'er the cadence of his lyre; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 456
 
CADENCED..........1
More subtle cadenced , more forest wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 494
 
CADENCES..........1
Saving, perhaps, some snow-light cadences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 79
 
CADUCEAN..........1
Delicate, put to the proof the lythe Caducean charm. Lamia, Part I, Line 133
 
CAESAR............1
At this great Caesar started on his feet, The Jealousies, Line 496
 
CAESARS...........1
On abject Caesars - not the stoutest band To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 12
 
CAF...............1
Asia, born of most enormous Caf , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 53
 
CAG'D.............2
No, obstinate boy, you shall be kept cag'd up, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 88
We are cag'd in; you need not pester that Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 2
 
CAGE..............2
Open wide the mind's cage -door, Fancy, Line 7
The parrot's cage and pannel square, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 76
 
CAGED.............1
And who the fool? The entrapp'd, the caged fool, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 106
 
CAIN..............2
O that the earth were empty, as when Cain Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 1
With brawny vengeance, like the labourer Cain . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 8
 
CAIRO.............1
Rest for a space 'twixt Cairo and Decan? To the Nile, Line 8
 
CAITIFF...........2
And his letter. Caitiff , he shall feel- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 70
The caitiff of the cold steel at his back. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 15
 
CAIUS.............1
Then follow, my Caius , then follow! Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 11
 
CAKE..............2
"You cannot eat your cake and have it too." Proverb On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Epigraph
The sacramental cake : To Fanny, Line 53
 
CAKED.............1
And the caked snow is shuffled Fancy, Line 20
 
CALABRIAN.........1
Or pale Calabrian ? or the Tuscan grape? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 122
 
CALAMITY..........2
As if calamity had but begun; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 38
As if calamity had but begun; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 340
 
CALF..............1
'Stead of one fatted calf , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 129b
 
CALIDORE..........7
I hotly burn - to be a Calidore - Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 12
Young Calidore is paddling o'er the lake; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 1
Whence Calidore might have the goodliest view Calidore: A Fragment, Line 25
On either side. These, gentle Calidore Calidore: A Fragment, Line 32
Had lifted Calidore for deeds of glory. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 108
Said the good man to Calidore alert; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 123
And placid eye, young Calidore is burning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 142
 
CALIPHAT..........1
Of the soon fading jealous caliphat ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 48
 
CALL..............23
Yet must I dote upon thee, - call thee sweet, Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 9
Will I call the Graces four. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 40
Call on thy gentle spirit to hover nigh Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 56
And what we, ignorantly, sheet-lightning call , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 29
That nought less sweet might call my thoughts away, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 94
Stepping like Homer at the trumpet's call , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 217
Lo! who dares say, "Do this"?- Who dares call down To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 9
And what our duties there: to nightly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 362
Unto what awful power shall I call ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 623
Hush! no exclaim - yet, justly mightst thou call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 471
To laugh, and play, and sing, and loudly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 515
Call ardently! He was indeed wayworn; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 655
And call it love? Alas, 'twas cruelty. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 972
Swallows obeying the south summer's call , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 816
Call me his queen, his second life's fair crown! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 70
Didst thou not after other climates call , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 142
We call thee fruitful, and, that very while, To the Nile, Line 3
And let me call heaven's blessing on thine eyes, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 3
In spirit sure I had a call - All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 35
Hubbub increases more they call out "Hush!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 254
Ye would not call this too indulged tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 298
Yet stay,- perhaps a charm may call you back, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 84
A summoner,- she will obey my call , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 76
 
CALL'D............12
Call'd up a thousand thoughts to envelope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 336
Cathedrals call'd . He bade a loth farewel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 626
Joyous all follow'd, as the leader call'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 813
In Provence call'd , "La belle dame sans mercy": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
That call'd the folk to evening prayer. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 3
Call'd doves of Siam, Lima mice, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 79
Call'd Vesper, who with silver veil Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 52
Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 53
You call'd ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 49c
Otho! thou father of the people call'd , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 118
Therefore he call'd a coach, and bade it drive amain. The Jealousies, Line 225
Call'd for an extra shawl, and gave her nurse a bite. The Jealousies, Line 648
 
CALLING...........4
Calling youth from idle slumbers, Ode to Apollo, Line 38
Calling the people to some other prayers, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 2
Has wept for thee, calling to Jove aloud. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 607
But, calling interest loyalty, swore faith Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 51
 
CALLOW............1
Like callow eagles at the first sunrise. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 859
 
CALLS.............6
Or anxious calls , or close of trembling palms, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 401
Pan's holy priest for young Endymion calls ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 815
Who calls on Otho? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 56b
Otho calls me his lion,- should I blush Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 42
Hear him! He calls you - sweet Auranthe, come! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
Which calls them Highland pebble-stones not worth a fly. The Jealousies, Line 747
 
CALM..............32
Or when his spirit, with more calm intent, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 27
Of late, too, I have had much calm enjoyment, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 119
Of conscience bids me be more calm awhile. Sleep and Poetry, Line 305
In the calm grandeur of a sober line, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 127
What a calm round of hours shall make my days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 983
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 2
An old man sitting calm and peacefully. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 192
And calm , and whispering, and hideous roar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 201
These uttering lips, while I in calm speech tell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 475
Upon a calm sea drifting: and meanwhile Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 406
But few have ever felt how calm and well Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 524
Calm speculation; but if you are wise, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 183
Pray thee be calm and do not quake nor stir, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 38
Such calm favonian burial! Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 11
Of triumph calm , and hymns of festival Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 128
This calm luxuriance of blissful light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 237
And to envisage circumstance, all calm , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 204
Full of calm joy it was, as I of grief; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 265
The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 335
Began calm -throated. Throughout all the isle Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 38
And their eternal calm , and all that face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 60
They lay calm -breathing on the bedded grass; Ode to Psyche, Line 15
He will be calm anon. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 49b
Let us be calm , and hear the abbot's plea Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 100
Ludolph, be calm . Ethelbert, peace awhile. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 103
Be calm in this. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 129b
Suck'd to my grave amid a dreary calm ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 27
More calm ; his features are less wild and flush'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 47
Like a young Jove with calm uneager face, Lamia, Part I, Line 218
And with calm -planted steps walk'd in austere; Lamia, Part II, Line 158
Of triumph calm , and hymns of festival The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 433
Whereat, to calm their fears, he promised soon The Jealousies, Line 24
 
CALM'D............4
Endymion was calm'd to life again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 464
She calm'd its wild hair with a golden comb, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 403
In the calm'd twilight of Platonic shades. Lamia, Part I, Line 236
And thou be conscience- calm'd . See, here it is- This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 7
 
CALMED............2
Can see all round upon the calmed vast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 867
I saw him on the calmed waters scud, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 236
 
CALMEST...........1
And calmest thoughts come round us - as, of leaves After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 9
 
CALMING...........1
For all his calming of my childish griefs, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 42
 
CALMLY............4
May we together pass, and calmly try To My Brothers, Line 12
Heaves calmly its broad swelling smoothness o'er Sleep and Poetry, Line 377
And twang'd it inwardly, and calmly said: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 848
And therefore fit to calmly put a close Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 211
 
CALMNESS..........1
And turns for calmness to the pleasant green Calidore: A Fragment, Line 9
 
CALUMNY...........3
Is blighted by the touch of calumny ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 137
An article made up of calumny The Jealousies, Line 104
Against that ugly piece of calumny , The Jealousies, Line 746
 
CAM'ST............1
"How cam'st thou over the unfooted sea? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 50
 
CAMEL.............1
My greedy thirst with nectarous camel -draughts; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 479
 
CAMEL'S...........1
Give him his proof! A camel's load of proofs! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 208
 
CAMP..............13
The Castle of Friedburg, its vicinity, and the Hungarian Camp Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, SCENE
That camp -mushroom, dishonour of our house; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 80
Among the midnight rumours from the camp . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 107
The bruised remnants of our stricken camp Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 127
The Prince a regal escort to his camp ; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 155
Still weep amid the wild Hungarian camp , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 196
Amid a camp , whose steeled swarms I dar'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 67
The entrance of GERSA'S Tent in the Hungarian Camp . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Setting
A trusty soul? A good man in the camp ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 2
[Shouts in the Camp . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.a to Line 7
In this beleaguer'd camp ? Or are you here Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 28
If men, in court and camp , lie not outright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 35
Here in this camp , where all the sisterhood, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 75
 
CAN'T.............5
And a sigh for I can't bear it! O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 18
Can't be got without hard money! Robin Hood, Line 48
You can't deny it. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 128a
"I can't say," said the monarch, "that may be The Jealousies, Line 397
Bad omen - this new match can't be a happy one. The Jealousies, Line 657
 
CANARY............1
Than mine host's Canary wine? Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 6
 
CANCEL............1
Poor cancel for his kindness to my youth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 41
 
CANDIED...........1
Of candied apple, quince, and plum, and gourd; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 265
 
CANDLE............1
There's a large cauliflower in each candle , Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 15
 
CANDLES...........1
Shall I put out the candles , please your Grace?" The Jealousies, Line 482
 
CANDLESTICKS......1
Candlesticks John saw in heaven, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 34
 
CANDY.............1
Some lady's fingers nice in Candy wine; The Jealousies, Line 429
 
CANKERING.........1
To hide the cankering venom, that had riven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 396
 
CANNON............1
And sudden cannon . Ah! how all this hums, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 18
 
CANNOT............78
'Tis vain - away I cannot chace Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 13
I cannot your light, mazy footsteps attend; To Some Ladies, Line 2
From such fine pictures, heavens! I cannot dare Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 19
Who cannot feel for cold her tender feet, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 14
It cannot be that ought will work him harm." To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 130
Imagination cannot freely fly Sleep and Poetry, Line 164
My boundly reverence, that I cannot trace Sleep and Poetry, Line 209
Cynthia! I cannot tell the greater blisses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 239
Forgive me, Haydon, that I cannot speak To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 1
Now while I cannot hear the city's din; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 40
He cannot see the heavens, nor the flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 285
Its powerless self: I know this cannot be. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 702
Affright this lethargy! I cannot quell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 769
He leant, wretched. He surely cannot now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 86
I cannot choose but kneel here and adore. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 302
This cannot be thy hand, and yet it is; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 315
The north cannot undo them In drear nighted December, Line 5
I cannot look upon the rose's dye, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 7
I cannot look on any budding flower, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 9
At thought of idleness cannot be idle, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 13
Be my award. Things cannot to the will Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 76
Cannot refer to any standard law Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 81
And cannot speak it. The first page I read Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 87
Thine eyes by gazing; but I cannot live Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 63
Were they unhappy then?- It cannot be- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 89
Another cannot wake thy giant size! To Ailsa Rock, Line 14
My eyes are wandering, and I cannot see, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 7
No, no, that horror cannot be - for at the cable's length There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 39
It cannot be! My old eyes are not true! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 28
Pray pardon me, I cannot help but smile- Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 8
I cannot say, ' O wherefore sleepest thou?' Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 54
Utterance thus.- "But cannot I create? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 141
Cannot I form? Cannot I fashion forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 142
Cannot I form? Cannot I fashion forth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 142
I cannot see - but darkness, death and darkness. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 242
So art thou not the last; it cannot be: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 189
"You cannot eat your cake and have it too." Proverb On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Epigraph
How fever'd is the man who cannot look On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 1
Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 29
I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 41
Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well Ode to a Nightingale, Line 73
She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 19
Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 21
So, ye three ghosts, adieu! Ye cannot raise Ode on Indolence, Line 51
Because I cannot flatter with bent knees Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 106
My lord, forgive me that I cannot see Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 30
That cannot trample on the fallen. But his Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 56
I cannot square my conduct to time, place, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 3
No, my good lord, I cannot say I did. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 121
Peace! peace, old man! I cannot think she is. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130
You cannot credit such a monstrous tale. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 138
I cannot . Take her. Fair Erminia, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 139
I cannot guess. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 70a
A minute first. It cannot be - but may Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 156
My evidence cannot be far away; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 161
I cannot doubt - I will not - no - to doubt Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 193
Silence! Gag up their mouths! I cannot bear Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 261
You cannot doubt but 'tis in Albert's power Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 6
No, I cannot doubt. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 7b
A glue upon my wings, that cannot spread, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 13
Cannot be done; for see, this chamber-floor Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 45
Albert! he cannot stickle, chew the cud Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 103
But, be it what it may, I cannot fail Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
I cannot , in plain terms, grossly assault Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 57
Indeed, indeed I cannot trace them further. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Page, Line 17
She's gone! I cannot clutch her! no revenge! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 25
Upon me sudden! for I cannot meet, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 17
I cannot catch you! You should laugh at me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
Let, let me hear his voice; this cannot last; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 41
Though my own knell they be! This cannot last! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 43
That pestilence brought in,- that cannot be, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 101
Alas! My lord, my lord! they cannot move her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 187
That finer spirits cannot breathe below Lamia, Part I, Line 280
It cannot be - adieu!" So said, she rose Lamia, Part I, Line 286
Is that old man? I cannot bring to mind Lamia, Part I, Line 372
I cannot tell. Let me no more be teas'd- Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 22
What image this, whose face I cannot see, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 213
I cannot cry, Wherefore thus sleepest thou? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 356
 
CANOE.............1
As breezeless lake, on which the slim canoe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 880
 
CANON.............1
Foisted into the canon law of love;- What can I do to drive away, Line 26
 
CANOPIED..........2
Conducting to the throne high canopied . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 16
So canopied , lay an untasted feast Lamia, Part II, Line 132
 
CANOPIES..........2
Broad leav'd are they and their white canopies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 22
Pour'd into shapes of curtain'd canopies , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 618
 
CANOPY............2
Beneath thy pinions canopy my head! To Hope, Line 36
This canopy mark: 'tis the work of a fay; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 25
 
CANST.............23
To mortal steps, before thou canst be ta'en Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 125
Art thou wayworn, or canst not further trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 651
Who, that thou canst not be for ever here, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 754
For these I know thou canst not feel a drouth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 395
Canst thou read aught? O read for pity's sake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 763
Warm mountaineer! for canst thou only bear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 54
Thou surely canst not bear a mind in pain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 811
Thou canst not surely be the same that thou didst seem." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 144
As thou canst move about, an evident God; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 338
And canst oppose to each malignant hour Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 339
But thou canst .- Be thou therefore in the van Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 343
What sorrow thou canst feel; for I am sad Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 69
Sylvan historian, who canst thus express Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 3
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 15
Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 17
Thou mak'st me boil as hot as thou canst flame! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 103
Will you? Ah, wretch, thou canst not, for I have Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 58
Possess whatever bliss thou canst devise, Lamia, Part I, Line 85
What canst thou say or do of charm enough Lamia, Part I, Line 274
Thou canst not ask me with thee here to roam Lamia, Part I, Line 276
Language pronounc'd. "If thou canst not ascend The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 107
Ere thou canst mount up these immortal steps." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 117
What benefit canst thou do, or all thy tribe, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 167
 
CANTERBURY........3
Live!- O! at Canterbury , with her old grand-dame." The Jealousies, Line 387
"In Canterbury doth your lady shine? The Jealousies, Line 413
"Those wings to Canterbury you must beat, The Jealousies, Line 498
 
CANTING...........1
At canting gallop- Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 18
 
CANTO.............2
End of Canto xii / Canto the xiii When they were come unto the Faery's court, Bet. 74 and 75
End of Canto xii / Canto the xiii When they were come unto the Faery's court, Bet. 74 and 75
 
CANVAS............2
The stubborn canvas for my voyage prepar'd- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 772
A child's soul through the sapphired canvas bear, The Jealousies, Line 38
 
CANVASS...........1
With shatter'd boat, oar snapt, and canvass rent, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 17
 
CANVASS'D.........1
Now 'tis I see a canvass'd ship, and now To My Brother George (epistle), Line 133
 
CAP...............10
Or as the winged cap of Mercury. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 115
My hunting cap , because I laugh'd and smil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 925
And Alexander with his night- cap on- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 8
A slight cap There was a naughty boy, Line 11
For night cap - There was a naughty boy, Line 12
By my old night cap , night cap night and day, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 42
By my old night cap, night cap night and day, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 42
This skull- cap wore the cowl from sloth, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 19
Though you've padded his night- cap , O sweet Isabel. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 4
With mad- cap pleasure, or hand-clasp'd amaze: The Jealousies, Line 724
 
CAPABLE...........3
Was Hesperean; to his capable ears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 674
Yet do thou strive; as thou art capable , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 337
This living hand, now warm and capable This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 1
 
CAPACIOUS.........2
Still downward with capacious whirl they glide; Sleep and Poetry, Line 133
Of thy capacious bosom ever flow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 950
 
CAPE..............3
Of love-spangles, just off yon cape of trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 83
That skims, or dives, or sleeps, 'twixt cape and cape. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 204
That skims, or dives, or sleeps, 'twixt cape and cape . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 204
 
CAPITAL...........1
Or round white columns wreath'd from capital to plinth. The Jealousies, Line 729
 
CAPITALS..........1
Exact in capitals your golden name: Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 2
 
CAPP'D............1
Many as bees about a straw- capp'd hive, The Jealousies, Line 260
 
CAPTAIN...........2
An Hungarian Captain Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 10
Enter an Hungarian Captain . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.b to Line 7
 
CAPTAINS..........4
Among his fallen captains on yon plains. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 92
Brave captains , thanks! Enough Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 80b
Enter two Captains , severally. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 9
Intreating him, his captains , and brave knights King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 25
 
CAPTIOUS..........1
Thy thunder, captious at the new command, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 362
 
CAPTIVE...........2
Had taken captive her two eyes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 27
The restoration of some captive maids, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 191
 
CAPTIVITY.........2
My long captivity and moanings all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 334
Young Gersa, from a short captivity Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 9
 
CAR...............10
And let there glide by many a pearly car , On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 6
O'er sailing the blue cragginess, a car Sleep and Poetry, Line 126
The visions all are fled - the car is fled Sleep and Poetry, Line 155
Their voices to the clouds, a fair wrought car , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 165
Meet some of our near-dwellers with my car ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 989
Blue heaven, and a silver car , air-borne, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 518
The impatient doves, up rose the floating car , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 580
"Within his car , aloft, young Bacchus stood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 209
Though bright Apollo's car stood burning here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
While through the thronged streets your bridal car Lamia, Part II, Line 63
 
CARCASE...........1
Doom'd with enfeebled carcase to outstretch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 690
 
CARDING...........1
I have, by many yards at least, been carding Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 3
 
CARE..............34
My daring steps: or if thy tender care , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 57
That aye at fall of night our care condoles. To My Brothers, Line 8
A laughing school-boy, without grief or care , Sleep and Poetry, Line 94
With honors; nor had any other care Sleep and Poetry, Line 179
Whose care it is to guard a thousand flocks: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 197
A yielding up, a cradling on her care . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 411
But wherefore this? What care , though owl did fly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 22
What care , though striding Alexander past Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 24
The glutted Cyclops, what care ? - Juliet leaning Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 27
Thy soul of care , by heavens, I would offer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 107
Than be - I care not what. O meekest dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 169
I care not for this old mysterious man!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 280
Before that care -worn sage, who trembling felt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 290
Parted its dripping leaves with eager care . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 678
Put sleekly on one side with nicest care ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 742
Who has another care when thou hast smil'd? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 979
Nor care for wind and tide. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 250
Of recollection! make my watchful care Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 307
And air, and pains, and care , and suffering; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 432
Tender soever, but is Jove's own care . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 878
Then 'gan she work again; nor stay'd her care , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 375
Too apt to fall in love with care All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 39
Scanty the hour and few the steps beyond the bourn of care , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 29
Closes up, and forgets all its Lethean care , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 11
On love, and wing'd St. Agnes' saintly care , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 44
With silver taper's light, and pious care , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 194
No care had touch'd his cheek with mortal doom, Character of C.B., Line 8
Free from cold and every care Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 21
I care not for cold or heat; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 75
His gentlemen conduct me with all care Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 97
The saints will bless you for this pious care . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 200
In care of the physicians. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 244
Nods, becks, and hints, should be obey'd with care , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 32
Not in your heart while care weighs on your brow: Lamia, Part II, Line 43
 
CARED.............2
Ne cared he for wine, or half and half, Character of C.B., Line 10
Ne cared he for fish, or flesh, or fowl, Character of C.B., Line 11
 
CAREER............2
Watching the sailing cloudlet's bright career , To one who has been long in city pent, Line 11
Spleen-hearted came in full career at him. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 43
 
CAREFUL...........9
A careful moving, caught my waking ears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 680
Broke through the careful silence; for they heard Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 495
Be careful , ere ye enter in, to fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 573
Careful and soft, that not a leaf may fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 928
And of thy seasons be a careful nurse."- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 348
Shutting with careful fingers and benign Sonnet to Sleep, Line 2
Moved 'twas with careful steps, and hush'd as death: Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 4
Feeling, with careful toe, for every stair, The Jealousies, Line 308
And retrograding careful as he can, The Jealousies, Line 309
 
CAREFULLY.........1
Dried carefully on the cooler side of sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 439
 
CARELESS..........9
Strive for her son to seize my careless heart; To Hope, Line 14
With careless robe, to meet the morning ray, To G.A.W., Line 7
Careless , and grand - fingers soft and round Sleep and Poetry, Line 333
Of careless butterflies: amid his pains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 765
Faint through his careless arms; content to see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 463
And freckles many; ah! a careless nurse, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 7
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, To Autumn, Line 14
And careless hectorers in proud bad verse. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 208
His woven periods into careless rhyme; The Jealousies, Line 636
 
CARES.............7
But 'tis impossible; far different cares To George Felton Mathew, Line 17
From little cares :- to find, with easy quest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 6
To sooth the cares , and lift the thoughts of man. Sleep and Poetry, Line 247
Some other gloominess, more dreadful cares , Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 3
And at the least 'twill startle off her cares ." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 40
Leaving your cares to one whose diligence Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 79
More dismal cares What can I do to drive away, Line 28
 
CARESS............1
Grew, like a lusty flower in June's caress . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 72
 
CARESSING.........2
Were dead and gone, and her caressing tongue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 340
Long time ere soft caressing sobs began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 736
 
CARIA.............1
The youth of Caria plac'd the lovely dame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 345
 
CARIAN............6
Went forward with the Carian side by side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 311
Olympus! we are safe! Now, Carian , break Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 764
Thou, Carian lord, hadst better have been tost Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 52
While to his lady meek the Carian turn'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 504
In thine own depth. Hail, gentle Carian ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 545
The Carian Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 763b
 
CARIAN'S..........1
Dew-dropping melody, in the Carian's ear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 373
 
CARICATURE........1
Caricature was vain, and vain the tart lampoon. The Jealousies, Line 18
 
CARLE.............1
He was to weet a melancholy carle , Character of C.B., Line 1
 
CARNAL............1
Of carnal passion; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 82
 
CAROLS............2
Therefore for her these vesper- carols are. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 834
Distant harvest- carols clear; Fancy, Line 40
 
CAROUSING.........1
What gipsies have you been carousing with? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 38
 
CARPET............3
And over the hush'd carpet , silent, stept, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 251
Broad golden fringe upon the carpet lies: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 285
Both, prostrate on the carpet , ear by ear, The Jealousies, Line 336
 
CARPET'S..........1
They kiss'd nine times the carpet's velvet face The Jealousies, Line 343
 
CARPETS...........2
And the long carpets rose along the gusty floor. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 360
Wool-woofed carpets : fifty wreaths of smoke Lamia, Part II, Line 179
 
CARRIED...........2
Lo! while slow carried through the pitying crowd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1019
habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
CARRY.............2
You needs must be. Carry it swift to Otho; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 73
May carry that with him shall make him die Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
 
CARV'D............2
The quaintly carv'd seats, and freshening shades; O come, dearest Emma!, Line 6
A crescent he had carv'd , and round it spent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 788
 
CARVE.............2
Carve it on my tomb, that, when I rest beneath, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 132
Carve it upon my 'scutcheon'd sepulchre. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 33
 
CARVED............5
The shafted arch and carved fret O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 3
The carved angels, ever eager-eyed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 34
Fresh carved cedar, mimicking a glade Lamia, Part II, Line 125
I look'd around upon the carved sides The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 61
Whose carved features wrinkled as he fell, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 225
 
CARVEN............1
All garlanded with carven imag'ries The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 209
 
CASE..............1
Gave mighty pulses: in this tottering case Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 305
 
CASEMENT..........4
A casement high and triple-arch'd there was, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 208
Full on this casement shone the wintry moon, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 217
A bright torch, and a casement ope at night, Ode to Psyche, Line 66
The open casement press'd a new-leaved vine, Ode on Indolence, Line 47
 
CASEMENTS.........2
Charm'd magic casements , opening on the foam Ode to a Nightingale, Line 69
Should fright her silken casements , and dismay Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 4
 
CASES.............1
Which never should be used but in alarming cases ." The Jealousies, Line 540
 
CASING............1
Blush in your casing helmets!- for see, see! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 3
 
CASKET............5
Serenely sleep:- she from a casket takes To My Brother George (epistle), Line 93
And seal the hushed casket of my soul. Sonnet to Sleep, Line 14
Like to a jealous casket , hold my pearl- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 103
Though Fancy's casket were unlock'd to choose. Lamia, Part I, Line 20
He lifted a bright casket of pure gold, The Jealousies, Line 510
 
CASKETED..........1
So that the jewel, safely casketed , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 431
 
CASKETS...........1
With emptied caskets , and her train upheld Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 86
 
CASQUE............2
Thy locks in a knightly casque are rested: Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 52
Voltaire with casque and shield and habergeon, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 7
 
CASSANDRA.........1
Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 1
 
CASSIA............1
Of whitest cassia , fresh from summer showers: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 96
 
CASSIA'S..........1
And intertwined the cassia's arms unite, To George Felton Mathew, Line 43
 
CASSOCK...........1
And next a chaplain in a cassock new; The Jealousies, Line 590
 
CAST..............14
Cast upward, through the waves, a ruby glow: Imitation of Spenser, Line 13
Beheld thee, pluck'd thee, cast thee in the stream To George Felton Mathew, Line 82
Its beams against the zodiac-lion cast , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 553
When I have cast this serpent-skin of woe?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 240
Endymion said: "Are not our fates all cast ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 901
And thus to be cast out, thus lorn to die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 959
And if Robin should be cast Robin Hood, Line 38
Cast wan upon it! Burns! with honour due On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 12
Cast on sunny bank its skin; Fancy, Line 58
When simplest things put on a sombre cast ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 123
And down the passage cast a glow upon the floor. Lamia, Part II, Line 15
What eyes are upward cast . As I had found The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 271
And cast a quiet figure in his second floor. The Jealousies, Line 288
The city all her unhived swarms had cast , The Jealousies, Line 719
 
CASTIGATION.......1
they if I thought a year's castigation would do them any good;- it will not: the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
CASTING...........1
Green tufted islands casting their soft shades Calidore: A Fragment, Line 46
 
CASTLE............20
Whence may be seen the castle gloomy, and grand: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 65
You know the Enchanted Castle - it doth stand Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 26
To shew this castle in fair dreaming wise Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 31
Towards the shade under the castle wall Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 59
Toward the castle or the cot where long ago was born There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 11
The Castle of Friedburg, its vicinity, and the Hungarian Camp Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, SCENE
An Apartment in the Castle . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Setting
The Court-yard of the Castle . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Setting
[Enter CONRAD, from the Castle , attended by two Knights and Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
[Enter, from the Castle , AURANTHE, followed by Pages holding Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
The Country, with the Castle in the distance. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Setting
He would be watching round the castle -walls, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 16
Let us to Friedburg castle . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 132
An Antichamber in the Castle . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Setting
An Apartment in the Castle . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Setting
Be what they may, and send him from the castle Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 55
Will leave this busy castle . You had best Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 172
An Apartment in the Castle . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Setting
An inner Court of the Castle . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Setting
[Exeunt into the Castle . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 17
 
CASTLED...........1
Castled her king with such a vixen look, The Jealousies, Line 704
 
CASTOR............1
Castor has tamed the planet Lion, see! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 591
 
CASTS.............2
New sudden thoughts, nor casts his mental slough? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 638
When the bee-hive casts its swarm; Fancy, Line 64
 
CAT...............3
Cat ! who hast past thy grand climacteric, To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 1
And Hazlitt playing with Miss Edgeworth's cat ; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 10
And silken furr'd Angora cat . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 82
 
CAT'S.............2
Of the wild cat's eyes, or the silvery stems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 50
Quick cat's -paws on the generous stray-away,- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 135
 
CATALOGUE.........1
In the dull catalogue of common things. Lamia, Part II, Line 233
 
CATARACT..........1
He of the cloud, the cataract , the lake, Addressed to the Same, Line 2
 
CATARACTS.........1
And all the everlasting cataracts , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 363
 
CATCH.............16
To catch the tunings of a voice divine. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 28
Are upward turn'd to catch the heavens' dew. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 23
And catch soft floatings from a faint-heard hymning; Sleep and Poetry, Line 34
Catch the white-handed nymphs in shady places, Sleep and Poetry, Line 105
To catch a glimpse of Fauns, and Dryades I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 153
Catch an immortal thought to pay the debt On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 4
And catch the cheated eye in wide surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 341
To catch a glance at silver throated eels,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 393
Doth catch at the maiden's gown. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 18
And from her chamber-window he would catch Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 19
I cannot catch you! You should laugh at me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
And fain would I catch up his dying words, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 42
O let me catch his voice - for lo! I hear Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 44
For should he catch a glimpse of my dull garb, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 53
Enough to catch me in but half a snare, What can I do to drive away, Line 8
To catch the treasure: "Best in all the town!" The Jealousies, Line 422
 
CATCHES...........1
Catches his freshness from archangel's wing: Addressed to the Same, Line 4
 
CATCHING..........2
Catching the notes of Philomel,- an eye To one who has been long in city pent, Line 10
And taper fingers catching at all things, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 59
 
CATERING..........1
On such a catering trust my dizzy head. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 177
 
CATES.............2
"All cates and dainties shall be stored there The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 173
An old lion sugar- cates of mild reprieve? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 172
 
CATHEDRAL.........2
This cathedral of the sea. Not Aladdin magian, Line 38
Like natural sculpture in cathedral cavern; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 86
 
CATHEDRAL'S.......1
As a large cross, some old cathedral's crest, Sleep and Poetry, Line 296
 
CATHEDRALS........2
Cathedrals call'd. He bade a loth farewel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 626
Of grey cathedrals , buttress'd walls, rent towers, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 67
 
CATS..............2
So scared, he sent for that "good king of cats ," Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 5
Two or three cats Two or three posies, Line 13
 
CAUDLE............1
Left my soft cushion chair and caudle pot? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 16
 
CAUGHT............21
Hadst caught the tones, nor suffered them to die. To Lord Byron, Line 5
The mountain flowers, when his glad senses caught Calidore: A Fragment, Line 54
No spherey strains by me could e'er be caught To My Brother George (epistle), Line 4
While, in my face, the freshest breeze I caught . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 122
When first my senses caught their tender falling. Sleep and Poetry, Line 330
Caught from the early sobbing of the morn. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 7
How she would start, and blush, thus to be caught I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 99
The hillock turf, and caught the latter end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 323
Offensive to the heavenly powers? Caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 509
A careful moving, caught my waking ears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 680
And here I bid it die. Have not I caught , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 986
He caught her airy form, thus did he plain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 301
And, when all were clear vanish'd, still he caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 583
A poet caught as he was journeying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 834
It ceased - I caught light footsteps; and anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 423
I caught a finger: but the downward weight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 673
And scarcely for one moment could be caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 388
Enlarge not to my hunger, or I'm caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 760
And I was startled, when I caught thy name Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 38
Caught infant-like from the far-foamed sands. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 172
Caught up his little legs, and, in a fret, The Jealousies, Line 201
 
CAULIFLOWER.......1
There's a large cauliflower in each candle, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 15
 
CAUSE.............11
Of those who in the cause of freedom fell; To George Felton Mathew, Line 66
How glorious this affection for the cause Addressed to Haydon, Line 9
She said with trembling chance: "Is this the cause ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 721
And is not this the cause God of the meridian, Line 16
Be cause of feud between us. See! he comes! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 119
To beard us for no cause ; he's not the man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 108
The cause for which you have disturb'd us here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
For what cause Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 48b
And for your absence may I guess the cause ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 67
And suffer'd in these temples; for that cause The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 180
But not for this cause ;- alas! she had more The Jealousies, Line 84
 
CAUSES............1
Contented fools causes for discontent, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 40
 
CAUTIONING........1
No more advices, no more cautioning ; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 1
 
CAVALIER..........1
Came many a tiptoe, amorous cavalier , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 60
 
CAVE..............10
Tracing along, it brought me to a cave , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 935
' Endymion! the cave is secreter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 965
And stirr'd them faintly. Verdant cave and cell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 678
Before he went into his quiet cave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 996
From the old womb of night, his cave forlorn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 372
Sink downward to his dusky cave again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 384
Hath led thee to this Cave of Quietude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 548
A hermit young, I'll live in mossy cave , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 860
A cave of young earth dragons - well, my boy, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 55
There was no covert, no retired cave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 39
 
CAVERN............10
With mellow utterance, like a cavern spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 576
And, but from the deep cavern there was borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 199
By a cavern wind unto a forest old; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 831
More did I love to lie in cavern rude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 354
Skulks to his cavern , 'mid the gruff complaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 952
Happy field or mossy cavern , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 3
Happy field or mossy cavern , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 25
From his north cavern . So sweet Isabel Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 255
Like natural sculpture in cathedral cavern ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 86
Haunters of cavern , lake, and waterfall, Lamia, Part I, Line 331
 
CAVERN'D..........1
Outblackens Erebus, and the full- cavern'd earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 121
 
CAVERN'S..........2
Sit ye near some old cavern's mouth and brood On the Sea, Line 13
That, near a cavern's mouth, for ever pour'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 85
 
CAVERNS...........4
Gluts twice ten thousand caverns ; till the spell On the Sea, Line 3
Huge dens and caverns in a mountain's side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 650
These dreary caverns for the open sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 987
Are cloudy phantasms. Caverns lone, farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 651
 
CAVES.............7
Hast thou from the caves of Golconda, a gem On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 1
Its ships, its rocks, its caves , its hopes, its fears,- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 6
When he upswimmeth from the coral caves , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 51
Fountains grotesque, new trees, bespangled caves , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 458
Through caves , and palaces of mottled ore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 594
Came swelling forth where little caves were wreath'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 665
Blue tides may sluice and drench their time in caves and weedy There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 18
 
CAW...............1
Or the rooks, with busy caw , Fancy, Line 45
 
CEAS'D............10
There, when new wonders ceas'd to float before, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 274
I clung about her waist, nor ceas'd to pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 626
"O that the flutter of this heart had ceas'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 728
"Lorenzo!"- here she ceas'd her timid quest, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 55
The bells had ceas'd , the prayers begun, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 23
The quavering thunder thereupon had ceas'd , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 225
He spake, and ceas'd , the while a heavier threat Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 251
Until it ceas'd ; and still he kept them wide: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 352
The nightingale had ceas'd , and a few stars Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 36
Of the sky children."- So he feebly ceas'd , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 438
 
CEASE.............10
Nor move till Milton's tuneful thunders cease , Ode to Apollo, Line 22
When I have fears that I may cease to be When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 1
There in that forest did his great love cease ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 218
With prayers that heaven would cease to bless O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 35
Yet could I on this very midnight cease , Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 11
His eyes to fever out, his voice to cease . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 138
To cease upon the midnight with no pain, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 56
Foul barbarian, cease ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 72b
Until they think warm days will never cease , To Autumn, Line 10
Return'd the Princess, "my tongue shall not cease The Jealousies, Line 62
 
CEASED............5
And revel'd in a chat that ceased not To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 117
It ceased - I caught light footsteps; and anon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 423
He ceased - she panted quick - and suddenly The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 295
By faint degrees, voice, lute, and pleasure ceased ; Lamia, Part II, Line 265
Sudden the music ceased , sudden the hand The Jealousies, Line 348
 
CEASELESS.........2
Mingled with ceaseless bleatings of his sheep: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 360
The ceaseless wonders of this ocean-bed. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 392
 
CEASES............1
Which, when it ceases in this mountain'd world, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 123
 
CEASING...........2
The poetry of earth is ceasing never: On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 9
No other sound succeeds; but ceasing here, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 124
 
CEDAR.............2
Wandering about in pine and cedar gloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 483
Fresh carved cedar , mimicking a glade Lamia, Part II, Line 125
 
CEDAR'D...........2
Ring-doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
From silken Samarcand to cedar'd Lebanon. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 270
 
CEDARS............1
Beneath the green-fan'd cedars , some did shroud The Jealousies, Line 691
 
CEILING...........1
On ceiling beam and old oak chair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 75
 
CEILING'S.........1
Down from the ceiling's height, pouring a noise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 923
 
CELESTIAL.........4
Sweet Hope, celestial influence round me shed, To Hope, Line 47
Up went the hum celestial . High afar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 581
Celestial Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 136
So Hermes thought, and a celestial heat Lamia, Part I, Line 22
 
CELL..............7
Some moulder'd steps lead into this cool cell , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 869
Or 'tis the cell of Echo, where she sits, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 947
I have a ditty for my hollow cell ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 130
And stirr'd them faintly. Verdant cave and cell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 678
Dovelike in the dim cell lying beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 65
And all around each eye's sepulchral cell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 404
No poison gender'd in close monkish cell The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 49
 
CELLED............1
Meagre from its celled sleep; Fancy, Line 56
 
CELLS.............6
For thee to tumble into Naiads' cells , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 272
Loiter'd around us; then of honey cells , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 668
As bees gorge full their cells . And, by the feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 40
Who, driven forth from their religious cells , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 193
Forc'd from their quiet cells , are parcell'd out Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 76
For summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells . To Autumn, Line 11
 
CENCHREAS.........2
In port Cenchreas , from Egina isle Lamia, Part I, Line 225
twenty-five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
CENCHREAS'........1
Who go on to Corinth from Cenchreas' shore; Lamia, Part I, Line 174
 
CENSER............8
From the censer to the skies Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 22
Like pious incense from a censer old, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 7
From chain-swung censer teeming; Ode to Psyche, Line 33
From swinged censer teeming; Ode to Psyche, Line 47
A censer fed with myrrh and spiced wood, Lamia, Part II, Line 176
Robes, golden tongs, censer , and chafing dish, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 79
About a golden censer from the hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 197
About a golden censer from her hand The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 219
 
CENSERS...........2
From fifty censers their light voyage took Lamia, Part II, Line 180
Like floral- censers swinging light in air; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 27
 
CENSORIOUS........1
My vein is not censorious - Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 99a
 
CENTAINE..........1
Take refuge.- Of bad lines a centaine dose Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 112
 
CENTAUR...........1
The ramping Centaur ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 595
 
CENTAUR'S.........1
The Centaur's arrow ready seems to pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 597
 
CENTAURS..........1
Swifter than centaurs after rapine bent.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 536
 
CENTINEL..........1
Yon centinel stars; and he who listens to it Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 842
 
CENTRE............2
Puzzled those eyes that for the centre sought; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 387
Even here, into my centre of repose, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 243
 
CENTRED...........1
When the whole kingdom, centred in ourself, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 65
 
CENTURIES.........2
His loath'd existence through ten centuries , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 691
Won from the gaze of many centuries : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 280
 
CENTURION.........1
But as a son. The bronz'd centurion , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 25
 
CEREMONIES........1
If ceremonies due they did aright; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 50
 
CEREMONIOUS.......1
Lie!- but begone all ceremonious points Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 89b
 
CEREMONY..........3
Conrad, with all due ceremony , give Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 154
In times of delicate brilliant ceremony : Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 55
And fragrant oils with ceremony meet Lamia, Part II, Line 194
 
CERES.............1
Shakes hand with our own Ceres ; every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 38
 
CERES'............2
Dulcet-eyed as Ceres' daughter, Fancy, Line 81
Of Ceres' horn, and, in huge vessels, wine Lamia, Part II, Line 187
 
CERTAIN...........7
Till, like the certain wands of Jacob's wit, Sleep and Poetry, Line 198
The message certain to be done to-morrow- Sleep and Poetry, Line 323
One felt heart- certain that he could not miss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 374
Whence, from a certain spot, its winding flood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 543
A certain shape or shadow, making way Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 122
A certain Arab haunting in these parts. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 120
Generously, without more certain guarantee, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 109
 
CERTAINTY.........2
Felt a high certainty of being blest. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 795
We met could answer any certainty . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 275
 
CERTES............4
Certes , a father's smile should, like sunlight, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 117
The serpent - Ha, the serpent! certes , she Lamia, Part II, Line 80
Stephen - me - prisoner. Certes , De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 32
" Certes , monsieur were best take to his feet, The Jealousies, Line 257
 
CEYLON............1
For them the Ceylon diver held his breath, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 113


Published @ RC

March 2005