Ch-Chi - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
CHACE.............3
'Tis vain - away I cannot chace Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 13
Chace him away, sweet Hope, with visage bright, To Hope, Line 17
My spear aloft, as signal for the chace - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 532
 
CHACED............1
Dian had chaced away that heaviness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 138
 
CHACING...........1
Chacing away all worldliness and folly; Sleep and Poetry, Line 26
 
CHAFF.............3
All chaff of custom, wipe away all slime Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 820
And sauces held he worthless as the chaff ; Character of C.B., Line 12
The whole world chaff to me. Your doom is fixed. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
 
CHAFING...........2
In chafing restlessness, is yet more drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 39
Robes, golden tongs, censer, and chafing dish, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 79
 
CHAGRIN...........1
And damn'd his House of Commons, in complete chagrin . The Jealousies, Line 135
 
CHAIN.............8
A sun-beamy tale of a wreath, and a chain ; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 22
And list to the tale of the wreath, and the chain , On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 39
The social smile, the chain for freedom's sake: Addressed to the Same, Line 6
My chain of grief: no longer strive to find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 979
A chain -droop'd lamp was flickering by each door; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 357
From chain -swung censer teeming; Ode to Psyche, Line 33
I'll chain up myself. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 110b
Her soft look growing coy, she saw his chain so sure: Lamia, Part I, Line 256
 
CHAIN'D...........3
In harmless tendril they each other chain'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 935
Some chain'd in torture, and some wandering. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 18
If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd , If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 1
 
CHAINS............7
Keep thy chains burst, and boldly say thou art free; On Peace, Line 12
The chains lie silent on the footworn stones;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 368
On land, on seas, in pagan- chains , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 91
Enter GERSA, in chains , and guarded. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 93
In chains , as just now stood that noble prince: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 168
And chains too heavy for your life; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 90b
Girdles, and chains , and holy jewelries. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 80
 
CHAIR.............8
Left my soft cushion chair and caudle pot? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 16
We're safe enough; here in this arm- chair sit, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 106
On ceiling beam and old oak chair , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 75
Ne with sly lemans in the scorner's chair ; Character of C.B., Line 15
By Peter's chair ! I have upon my tongue Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 67
QUEEN MAUD in a chair of state. The EARLS OF GLOCESTER and King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
It was too much. He shrunk back in his chair , The Jealousies, Line 456
While that fair Princess, from her winged chair , The Jealousies, Line 740
 
CHAIRMEN..........1
It swallows chairmen , damns, and hackney coaches. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 15
 
CHALDEAN..........1
Begone!- for you, Chaldean ! here remain; The Jealousies, Line 357
 
CHALDEANS.........1
And set those old Chaldeans to their tasks.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 21
 
CHALDEE...........1
Built by a banish'd santon of Chaldee : Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 42
 
CHALK.............1
For chalk , I hear, stands at a pretty price; The Jealousies, Line 290
 
CHAM..............2
"Upon my honour!" said the son of Cham , The Jealousies, Line 403
Cham is said to have been the inventor of magic. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
CHAMBER...........16
Now Morning from her orient chamber came, Imitation of Spenser, Line 1
Soon in a pleasant chamber they are seated; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 134
A chamber , myrtle wall'd, embowered high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 389
And from her chamber -window he would catch Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 19
She, to her chamber gone, a ditty fair Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 77
Even to Madeline's chamber , and there hide The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 164
The maiden's chamber , silken, hush'd, and chaste; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 187
A window to her chamber neighbour'd near, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 142
Cannot be done; for see, this chamber -floor Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 45
At seeing me in this chamber . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 161a
E'en to her chamber -door, and there, fair boy,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Above the lintel of their chamber door, Lamia, Part II, Line 14
And shut the chamber up, close, hush'd and still, Lamia, Part II, Line 143
The awed presence chamber may be bold King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 30
A Presence Chamber . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Setting
And breathe themselves at th' Emperor's chamber door, The Jealousies, Line 323
 
CHAMBER'S.........1
The chamber's empty! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 127b
 
CHAMBERLAIN.......1
First wily Crafticant, the chamberlain , The Jealousies, Line 580
 
CHAMBERS..........4
The level chambers , ready with their pride, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 32
For him, those chambers held barbarian hordes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 85
In all the unknown chambers of the dead, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 18
In the dark secret chambers of her skull The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 278
 
CHAMPAGNE.........1
Sherry in silver, hock in gold, or glass'd champagne ?" The Jealousies, Line 360
 
CHAMPAIGN.........2
Their fellow huntsmen o'er the wide champaign Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 386
And, after looking round the champaign wide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 347
 
CHAMPION..........1
What when a stout unbending champion awes Addressed to Haydon, Line 11
 
CHANC'D...........1
And so it chanc'd , for many a door was wide, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 29
 
CHANCE............20
She said with trembling chance : "Is this the cause? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 721
The happy chance : so happy, I was fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 891
From place to place, and following at chance , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 930
By this the sun is setting; we may chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 988
How a restoring chance came down to quell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 644
Or height, or depth, or width, or any chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 357
Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance ; When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 8
It came like a fierce potion, drunk by chance , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 267
He reads it on the mountain's height, where chance he may sit down There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 43
Ah, happy chance ! the aged creature came, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 91
And they had had it, but, O happy chance , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 47
Advantage of your chance discoveries Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 116
It was my chance to meet his olive brow, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 54
Prythee, fair lady, what chance brought you here? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 96
That I, by happy chance , hit the right man Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 252
And wonder that 'tis so,- the magic chance ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 69
For by some freakful chance he made retire Lamia, Part I, Line 230
How long I slumber'd 'tis a chance to guess. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 57
If by a chance into this fane they come, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 152
The strangest sight - the most unlook'd-for chance - The Jealousies, Line 755
 
CHANCED...........1
And listen'd to her breathing, if it chanced The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 246
 
CHANCEL...........1
In dull November, and their chancel vault, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 37
 
CHANCELLOR........2
And as for the Chancellor - dominat. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 12
"I'll trounce 'em!- there's the square-cut chancellor , The Jealousies, Line 145
 
CHANCES...........1
Of all the chances in their earthly walk; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 388
 
CHANDELIERS.......1
These pendent lamps and chandeliers are bright Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 40
 
CHANG'D...........7
Apollo chang'd thee; how thou next didst seem To George Felton Mathew, Line 86
You chang'd the footpath for the grassy plain. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 126
Stood silent round the shrine: each look was chang'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 186
How chang'd , how full of ache, how gone in woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 80
How chang'd thou art! how pallid, chill, and drear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 311
What more than I know of could so have chang'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 142
Have chang'd a God into a shaking palsy. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 426
 
CHANGE............14
Nor e'er will the notes from their tenderness change ; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 35
Ah! thou hast been uphappy at the change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 520
Vexing conceptions of some sudden change ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 236
The solitary felt a hurried change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 633
How lightning-swift the change ! a youthful wight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 775
Thou shouldst, my love, by some unlook'd for change Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 992
There was a painful change , that nigh expell'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 300
And bid the day begin, if but for change . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 291
That I may never know how change the moons, Ode on Indolence, Line 39
May change you to a spider, so to crawl Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
To change ; her elfin blood in madness ran, Lamia, Part I, Line 147
To change his purpose. He thereat was stung, Lamia, Part II, Line 69
It works a constant change , which happy death The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 259
Of change , hour after hour I curs'd myself: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 399
 
CHANGE'S..........1
A pigeon's somerset, for sport or change's sake. The Jealousies, Line 45
 
CHANGED...........3
Are changed to harmonies, for ever stealing To Kosciusko, Line 7
The streams with changed magic interlace: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 613
How specious heaven was changed to real hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 476
 
CHANGEFUL.........1
Were clogg'd in some thick cloud? O, changeful Love, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 32
 
CHANGELING........2
She is a changeling of my management; The Jealousies, Line 389
"She is my dainty changeling , near and dear, The Jealousies, Line 404
 
CHANGES...........1
Of happy changes in emphatic dreams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 414
 
CHANGING..........3
The reading of an ever- changing tale; Sleep and Poetry, Line 91
Hither and thither all the changing thoughts Sleep and Poetry, Line 287
With an electral changing misery The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 246
 
CHANNEL...........2
To its old channel , or a swollen tide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 340
Had made a miry channel for his tears. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 280
 
CHANNELS..........2
Into its airy channels with so subtle, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 750
The channels where my coolest waters flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 991
 
CHANT.............1
Alone: I chant alone the holy mass, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 307
 
CHANTED...........1
And as he went she chanted merrily. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 208
 
CHANTRY...........1
The chantry boy sings, The Gothic looks solemn, Line 10
 
CHAOS.............7
Uprisen o'er chaos : and with such a stun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 247
Dark as the parentage of chaos . Hark! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 912
Where is another Chaos ? Where?"- That word Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 145
From Chaos and parental Darkness came Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 191
Than Chaos and blank Darkness, though once chiefs; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 207
Of shapeless Chaos . Say, doth the dull soil Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 217
Intrigue with the specious chaos , and dispart Lamia, Part I, Line 195
 
CHAPEL............4
The little chapel with the cross above Calidore: A Fragment, Line 42
And many a chapel bell the hour is telling, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 310
For seldom did she go to chapel -shrift, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 467
Along the chapel aisle by slow degrees: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 13
 
CHAPLAIN..........1
And next a chaplain in a cassock new; The Jealousies, Line 590
 
CHAPLETS..........1
Of laurel chaplets , and Apollo's glories; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 45
 
CHAPMAN...........1
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 8
 
CHAPMEN...........1
Of loggerheads and chapmen ;- we are told Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 11
 
CHAPP'D...........1
Who waits for thee, as the chapp'd earth for rain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 33
 
CHAPTER...........2
Well, let us see,- tenth book and chapter nine,- The Jealousies, Line 640
To the second chapter of my fortieth book, The Jealousies, Line 706
 
CHARACTER.........1
the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph4
 
CHARACTER'D.......2
So plainly character'd , no breeze would shiver Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 890
There must be surely character'd strange things, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 62
 
CHARACTERS........1
On this scroll thou seest written in characters fair On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 21
 
CHARACTERY........2
Nor mark'd with any sign or charactery - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 762
Had swollen and green'd the pious charactery , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 790
 
CHARACTRY.........1
Before high piled books, in charactry , When I have fears that I may cease to be, Line 3
 
CHARGE............3
O ye whose charge Sleep and Poetry, Line 206b
Buds lavish gold; or ye, whose precious charge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 203
At one pernicious charge of the enemy, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 66
 
CHARIOT...........10
The thought of that same chariot , and the strange Sleep and Poetry, Line 161
Of Bacchus from his chariot , when his eye Sleep and Poetry, Line 335
His snorting four. Now when his chariot last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 552
How lithe! When this thy chariot attains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 191
In sombre chariot ; dark foldings thrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 641
Apollo singeth, while his chariot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 958
With wings or chariot fierce to repossess Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 123
Have ye beheld his chariot , foam'd along Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 234
So wearily, as if night's chariot -wheels Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
Veil'd, in a chariot , heralded along Lamia, Part II, Line 108
 
CHARIOTED.........1
Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 32
 
CHARIOTEER........3
And steeds with streamy manes - the charioteer Sleep and Poetry, Line 127
The charioteer with wond'rous gesture talks Sleep and Poetry, Line 136
Charioteer God of the golden bow, Line 5
 
CHARIOTING........1
Charioting foremost in the envious race, Lamia, Part I, Line 217
 
CHARITABLE........3
O charitable Echo! hear, and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 958
Of life from charitable voice? No sweet saying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 45
Those charitable eyes will thaw my heart, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 144
 
CHARITIES.........1
Around my bed its lulling charities . Sonnet to Sleep, Line 8
 
CHARITY...........2
Much charity , and ne'er neglect O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 38
O save, in charity , To Fanny, Line 23
 
CHARLES...........2
By this, friend Charles , you may full plainly see To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 21
Again I shake your hand,- friend Charles , good night. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 132
 
CHARLES'S.........1
the Anniversary of Charles's Restoration, on Hearing the Bells Lines Written on 29 May, Extended Title
 
CHARM.............25
Thy notes the blossoms charm to blow, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 11
From my despairing breast to charm Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 9
And charm the ear of evening fair, Ode to Apollo, Line 46
Could charm them into such an attitude. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 7
That my soft verse will charm thy daughters fair, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 108
With him," said I, "will take a pleasant charm ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 129
The very archings of her eye-lids charm Sleep and Poetry, Line 238
As plainly in his ear, as the faint charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 356
Between her kissing breasts, and every charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 947
Against his pallid face: he felt the charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 105
Thou wast the charm of women, lovely Moon! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 169
She lifted up the charm : appealing groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 518
Endymion, with quick hand, the charm applied- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 781
He flapp'd towards the sound. Alas, no charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 556
Och the charm There was a naughty boy, Line 53
O Stranger, thou my nerves from pipe didst charm ; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 10
For a song and for a charm - 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 6
But dares not look behind, or all the charm is fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 234
By the dusk curtains:- 'twas a midnight charm The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 282
Yet stay,- perhaps a charm may call you back, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 84
Delicate, put to the proof the lythe Caducean charm . Lamia, Part I, Line 133
What canst thou say or do of charm enough Lamia, Part I, Line 274
Throughout, as fearful the whole charm might fade. Lamia, Part II, Line 124
Imagination from the sable charm The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 10
This is the magic, this the potent charm , The Jealousies, Line 518
 
CHARM'D...........6
Of all that ever charm'd romantic eye: Imitation of Spenser, Line 24
Her shadow fell upon his breast, and charm'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 527
And underneath their shadow charm'd her eyes Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 6
So play'd, so charm'd , so conquer'd, so bereft As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 4
Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Ode to a Nightingale, Line 69
Charm'd into ever freezing, lay an old The Jealousies, Line 512
 
CHARMED...........6
Methought I fainted at the charmed touch, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 637
Charmed to death by the drone of the humming may fly. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 12
When Madeline, St. Agnes' charmed maid, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 192
Tall oaks, branch- charmed by the earnest stars, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 74
Then, once again, the charmed God began Lamia, Part I, Line 112
Forests, branch- charmed by the earnest stars, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 373
 
CHARMING..........5
Of charming my mind from the trammels of pain. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 24
My charming rod, my potent river spells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 116
Her charming syllables, till indistinct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 444
And charming Mister Lovels? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 40
A woman's shape, and charming as before. Lamia, Part I, Line 118
 
CHARMINGLY........1
Of dulcet instruments came charmingly ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 942
 
CHARMS............6
Such charms with mild intelligences shine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 26
Charms us at once away from all our troubles: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 138
Into the deadening ether that still charms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 209
See not her charms ! Is Phoebe passionless? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 56
War on his temples. Do not all charms fly Lamia, Part II, Line 229
Faded the flower and all its budded charms , The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 5
 
CHARNEL...........1
Death fell a weeping in his charnel -house. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 788
 
CHARON'S..........1
O such deformities! Old Charon's self, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 503
 
CHARTER...........1
Who dares take such large charter from our smiles! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 70
 
CHARTERS..........1
The charters of man's greatness, at this hour Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 15
 
CHASE.............3
Made by some mighty oaks: as they would chase Sleep and Poetry, Line 140
Among his brothers of the mountain chase . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 192
But such a love is mine, that here I chase Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 590
 
CHASM.............1
And every gulf, and every chasm old, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 360
 
CHASMS............2
Enormous chasms , where, all foam and roar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 601
I look into the chasms , and a shroud Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 3
 
CHASTE............3
Came chaste Diana from her shady bower, To George Felton Mathew, Line 79
Moving more near the while. "O Haunter chaste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 302
The maiden's chamber, silken, hush'd, and chaste ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 187
 
CHASTENED.........1
Down-looking - aye, and with a chastened light On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 2
 
CHASTER...........1
Chaster than a nun's, who singeth You say you love; but with a voice, Line 2
 
CHASTITY..........3
A hymn in praise of spotless chastity . Ode to Apollo, Line 33
In chastity : yes, Pallas has been sighing, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 802
In that same void white Chastity shall sit, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 883
 
CHAT..............1
And revel'd in a chat that ceased not To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 117
 
CHATS.............1
With him who elegantly chats , and talks- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 43
 
CHATTED...........1
Chatted with thee, and many days exil'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 926
 
CHATTELS..........1
And so is my revenge, my lawful chattels ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 137
 
CHATTER...........1
And chatter with dack'd hair'd critics, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 39
 
CHATTERING........1
To chattering pigmies? I would have you know Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 61
 
CHATTERTON........3
Oh Chatterton ! how very sad thy fate! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 1
And sit, and rhyme and think on Chatterton ; To George Felton Mathew, Line 56
INSCRIBED TO THE MEMORY OF THOMAS CHATTERTON Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Dedication
 
CHAUCER...........2
Than I, for I n'ad sicknesse nor disese." Chaucer Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
To stammer where old Chaucer used to sing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 134
 
CHAUNT............2
That I must chaunt thy lady's dirge, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 2
Who shall delay her flight? And she must chaunt Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 83
 
CHAUNTING.........2
Where the fairies are chaunting their evening hymns, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 7
The soft, lute-finger'd Muses chaunting clear, Lamia, Part I, Line 73
 
CHEAT.............4
Hence, pageant history! hence, gilded cheat ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 14
Shall airy voices cheat me to the shore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 654
Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well Ode to a Nightingale, Line 73
Do not cheat yourself Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 127b
 
CHEATED...........5
Cheated by shadowy wooer from the clouds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 190
And catch the cheated eye in wide surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 341
Down she sat, poor cheated soul, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 69
Poor cheated Ludolph! Make the forest hiss Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
Men shall confess,- this prince was gull'd and cheated , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 133
 
CHEATER...........2
She was the cheater ! Who's the cheater now, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 105
She was the cheater! Who's the cheater now, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 105
 
CHEATS............2
Such innocence to ruin, - who vilely cheats Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 35
Cheats us into a swamp, into a fire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 279
 
CHECK.............1
Philosophising thus, he pull'd the check , The Jealousies, Line 253
 
CHECK'D...........1
Predestin'd for his ear, scape as half check'd King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 54
 
CHECKING..........1
Till, checking his love trance, a cup he took Lamia, Part II, Line 241
 
CHEEK.............32
He feels a moisture on his cheek , and blesses Calidore: A Fragment, Line 90
And this he fondled with his happy cheek Calidore: A Fragment, Line 97
Made Ariadne's cheek look blushingly. Sleep and Poetry, Line 336
Sweet Sappho's cheek - a sleeping infant's breath- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 12
For Hero's cheek and smiles against her smile. On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 11
With half-shut eyes and comfortable cheek , On The Story of Rimini, Line 2
Beckon'd their sons to silence; while each cheek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 188
To tint her pallid cheek with bloom, who cons Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 368
Her very cheek against my crowned lip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 662
Left his young cheek ; and how he used to stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 728
Upon his cheek , while thus he lifeful spake. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 768
Of this in heaven: I have mark'd each cheek , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 570
For one as sorrowful: thy cheek is pale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 75
For one whose cheek is pale: thou dost bewail Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 76
With dry cheek who can tell? While thus my might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 616
She kist the sea-nymph's cheek ,- who sat her down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 896
I'm giddy at that cheek so fair and smooth; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 311
Laws to my footsteps, colour to my cheek , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 714
But to thy cheek my soul doth take its flight: Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 8
More soft, more white, and her fair cheek more fair; Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 6
The flush of welcome ever on the cheek . To J.R., Line 4
Until sweet Isabella's untouch'd cheek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 33
Her cheek was flush wi' timid blood Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 27
With reddened cheek - Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 34
Where's the cheek that doth not fade, Fancy, Line 69
No care had touch'd his cheek with mortal doom, Character of C.B., Line 8
Ne with lewd ribbalds sat he cheek by jowl, Character of C.B., Line 14
By many a damsel hoarse and rouge of cheek ; Character of C.B., Line 23
The second was Ambition, pale of cheek , Ode on Indolence, Line 26
Concerning what will make that sin-worn cheek Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
Wheels round its dazzling spokes."- The lady's cheek Lamia, Part II, Line 64
Misted the cheek ; no passion to illume Lamia, Part II, Line 274
 
CHEEKS............10
They gave each other's cheeks ; with all their sighs, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 145
Her motherly cheeks . Arous'd from this sad mood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 343
Blush-tinted cheeks , half smiles, and faintest sighs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 619
Till thou hadst cool'd their cheeks deliciously: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 148
Will trespass down those cheeks . Companion fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 870
Made their cheeks paler by the break of June: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 26
Show'd her pale cheeks , and all her forehead wan, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 114
And on thy cheeks a fading rose La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 11
Cheeks fashion'd tenderly on either side, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 66
Flush'd were their cheeks , and bright eyes double bright: Lamia, Part II, Line 214
 
CHEER.............10
O bright-eyed Hope, my morbid fancy cheer ; To Hope, Line 21
That men of health were of unusual cheer ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 216
To cheer itself to Delphi. Still his feet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 82
Might seem unholy, be of happy cheer ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 435
Striving their ghastly malady to cheer , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 897
To cheer the brave remainder of your host Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 131
Console my poor boy, cheer him, heal his spirits? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 14
This should cheer up your Highness; the weariness Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 57
The roof of awful richness, nectarous cheer , Lamia, Part II, Line 207
She does not mean it really. Cheer up, hearty - there! The Jealousies, Line 459
 
CHEERED...........2
Our idle sheep. So be thou cheered , sweet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 486
He might have died: but now, with cheered feel, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 139
 
CHEERFUL..........3
Thee for enlivening all the cheerful eyes Sleep and Poetry, Line 17
Too cheerful for these foul pernicious days. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
"At half-past three arose the cheerful moon- The Jealousies, Line 685
 
CHEERFULNESS......1
And frown, to drive fair Cheerfulness away, To Hope, Line 10
 
CHEERILY..........1
And buzzes cheerily from bower to bower? Sleep and Poetry, Line 4
 
CHEERING..........3
And, smiles with his star- cheering voice sweetly blending, To Some Ladies, Line 19
Haunt us till they become a cheering light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 30
Came gold around me, cheering me to cope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 686
 
CHEERLY...........2
But cheerly , cheerly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 176
But cheerly, cheerly , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 176
 
CHEERS............3
Whose tips are glowing hot. The legend cheers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 841
"This cheers our fallen house: come to our friends, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 150
hearing the cheers of the soldiery). Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 85
 
CHEESE............1
And the cheese is overtoasted, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 15
 
CHEQUER...........3
Chequer my tablet with their quivering shades. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 126
The frequent chequer of a youngling tree, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 38
In pink and purple chequer , nor, up-pil'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 287
 
CHEQUER'D.........1
Slowly across the chequer'd shadows pass. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 68
 
CHEQUERED.........1
Or a green hill o'erspread with chequered dress Sleep and Poetry, Line 77
 
CHERISH...........1
Beneath the cherish of a star Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 51
 
CHERISHINGLY......1
Cherishingly Diana's timorous limbs;- Sleep and Poetry, Line 373
 
CHERRY............3
He kiss'd my lady's cherry lips, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 7
That a cherry There was a naughty boy, Line 103
Or nantz, or cherry brandy, drank full meek Character of C.B., Line 22
 
CHERUB............1
If a cherub , on pinions of silver descending, To Some Ladies, Line 17
 
CHERUB'S..........1
Two witch's eyes above a cherub's mouth, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 6
 
CHERUBIM..........2
Cherubim and golden mice. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 38
As in old pictures tender cherubim The Jealousies, Line 37
 
CHESS.............2
Or if it please him play an hour at chess - King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 45
"She cried for chess - I play'd a game with her- The Jealousies, Line 703
 
CHESTER...........6
EARL OF CHESTER King Stephen 3
Of boisterous Chester , whose fell truncheon now King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 22
Not twenty Earls of Chester shall brow-beat King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 35
[Trumpets. Enter the EARL OF CHESTER and Knights. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 47
CHESTER , Lords, Attendants. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
My Lord of Chester , is't true what I hear King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 24
 
CHESTER'S.........1
It paunch'd the Earl of Chester's horse, who then King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 42
 
CHESTNUTS.........2
Tall chestnuts keep away the sun and moon:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 207
Around me beeches and high chestnuts shed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 300
 
CHEW..............1
Albert! he cannot stickle, chew the cud Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 103
 
CHEWS.............1
He chews the honied cud of fair spring thoughts, Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 6
 
CHICK.............2
Of fish and mice and rats and tender chick . To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 8
Braw Tam was daffed like a chick , Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 35
 
CHIDDEN...........2
Had chidden herald Hesperus away, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 685
Indeed I am - thwarted, affrighted, chidden , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 753
 
CHIDE.............3
How to frown and how to chide ; Fancy, Line 83
The silver, snarling trumpets 'gan to chide : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 31
To chide , and to reproach that solitude Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 268
 
CHIEF.............12
Some mountain breeze had turned its chief delight, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 9
To the chief intensity: the crown of these Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 800
His paces back into the temple's chief ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 298
In human accent: ' Potent goddess! chief Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 539
He shall not die. Moreover, and in chief , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 701
Chief of organic numbers! Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 1
Chief Poet! and ye clouds of Albion, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 9
Chief of the pyramid and crocodile! To the Nile, Line 2
Chief isle of the embowered Cyclades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 23
She is the world's chief jewel, and, by heaven, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 73
By her glad Lycius sitting, in chief place, Lamia, Part II, Line 239
Where the Chief Justice on his knees and hands doth crawl. The Jealousies, Line 765
 
CHIEFDOM..........1
Can it deny the chiefdom of green groves? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 220
 
CHIEFLIE..........1
And chieflie whate he auctorethe The Eve of St. Mark, Line 113
 
CHIEFLY...........3
Chiefly by shifting to this lady's room Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 146
I was a mad conspirator, chiefly too Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 141
And chiefly of the veils, that from her brow The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 252
 
CHIEFS............5
Than Chaos and blank Darkness, though once chiefs ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 207
That even the homage of his ranged chiefs Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 11
[Enter Chiefs . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 147b
[Exeunt Chiefs . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 151
Sits in the banquet-room among his chiefs ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 62
 
CHIEFTAIN.........2
A chieftain king's: beneath his breast, half bare, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 172
And now, O winged Chieftain ! thou hast sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 100
 
CHILD.............42
Dear child of sorrow! son of misery! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 2
Over the trippings of a little child : Sleep and Poetry, Line 369
To meet his rosy child , with feathery sails, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 379
Than Dryope's lone lulling of her child ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 495
When love-lorn hours had left me less a child , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 885
But woe is me, I am but as a child Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 120
But Venus, bending forward, said: "My child , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 548
My heart so potently? When yet a child Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 143
She took me like a child of suckling time, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 456
"Bright-winged Child ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 978
Before the first of Druids was a child ;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 7
When yet a child , I heard that kisses drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 738
When her young infant child God of the meridian, Line 14
Yet brought him to the meekness of a child : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 47
Burns in thee, child ?- What good can thee betide, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 349
At such a time the soul's a child , in childhood is the brain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 23
Child , I see thee! Child, I've found thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 27
Child, I see thee! Child , I've found thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 27
Child , I see thee! Child, I spy thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 29
Child, I see thee! Child , I spy thee, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 29
Child , I know thee! Child no more, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 31
Child, I know thee! Child no more, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 31
Little child 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 49
Little child 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 54
Follow me, child , or else these stones will be thy bier." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 108
Wait here, my child , with patience; kneel in prayer The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 178
And how a litling child mote be The Eve of St. Mark, Line 103
Of these new-form'd art thou, oh brightest child ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 319
Full beautiful, a fairy's child ; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 14
And mid-May's eldest child , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 48
Thou foster- child of silence and slow time, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 2
Is now your infant;- I am a weak child . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 120
His deep heart-sickness for a rebel child . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 39
Not a word more. Let me embrace my child . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 98
Of my great love for thee, my supreme child ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 125
Nonsense! Child ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 28b
Well? What ails thee, child ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 115a
Why will ye keep me from my darling child ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 10
My miserable child ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 38
Gersa, watch him like a child ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 50b
By great Apollo, thy dear foster child , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 286
"Good! good!" cried Hum, "I've known her from a child ! The Jealousies, Line 388
 
CHILD'S...........2
Is beating with a child's anxiety, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 23
A child's soul through the sapphired canvas bear, The Jealousies, Line 38
 
CHILDHOOD.........2
At such a time the soul's a child, in childhood is the brain; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 23
Remember'd it from childhood all complete Lamia, Part II, Line 153
 
CHILDISH..........3
Inconstant, childish , proud, and full of fancies; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 2
When every childish fashion Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 22
For all his calming of my childish griefs, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 42
 
CHILDREN..........9
A troop of little children garlanded; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 110
Fair creatures! whose young children's children bred Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 317
Old Atlas' children ? Art a maid of the waters, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 690
My children fair, my lovely girls and boys! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 547
Will I to children utter, and repent. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 645
Of the sky- children ; I will give command: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 133
"O brightest of my children dear, earth-born Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 309
To these fair children , stars of a new age? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 22
Of the sky children ."- So he feebly ceas'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 438
 
CHILDREN'S........1
Fair creatures! whose young children's children bred Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 317
 
CHILL.............14
A chill as from a tomb, did I not know Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 10
Spun off a drizzling dew,- which falling chill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 520
His spreaded feathers to the morrow chill , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 389
The storm, and through chill aguish gloom outburst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 675
She kiss'd it with a lip more chill than stone, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 371
Let not quick Winter chill its dying hour!- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 450
St. Agnes' Eve - Ah, bitter chill it was! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 1
Pale, lattic'd, chill , and silent as a tomb. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 113
How chang'd thou art! how pallid, chill , and drear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 311
When the chill rain begins at shut of eve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 36
As hot as death's is chill , with fierce convulse Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 129
You chill me with astonishment! How's this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 215
Burning,- when suddenly a palsied chill The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 122
So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 4
 
CHILLED...........1
But the God fostering her chilled hand, Lamia, Part I, Line 140
 
CHILLIEST.........1
To warm their chilliest bubbles in the grass; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 103
 
CHILLING..........1
Frozen north, and chilling east, Robin Hood, Line 7
 
CHILLY............11
A little lower than the chilly sheen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 207
But as the murmuring surge. Chilly and numb Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 243
By chilly finger'd spring. "Unhappy wight! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 971
With tears, as chilly as a dripping well, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 406
And she forgot the chilly autumn breeze; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 420
Soon, trembling in her soft and chilly nest, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 235
Filling the chilly room with perfume light.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 275
The chilly sunset faintly told The Eve of St. Mark, Line 7
Suddenly on the ocean's chilly streams. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 268
Of chilly rain, and shivering air. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 22
Chilly lovers, what a rout Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 64
 
CHIME.............3
Do they occasion; 'tis a pleasing chime . How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 8
While the chime -bell ringeth- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 4
Funeral and steeple- chime ; Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 11
 
CHIMES............2
I partly owe to him: and thus, the chimes Sleep and Poetry, Line 350
To music of the drowsy chimes . The Eve of St. Mark, Line 66
 
CHIMNEY...........1
As spectacled she sits in chimney nook. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 131
 
CHIN..............5
Pillow my chin for ever? ever press Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 742
No reveller had ever dipp'd a chin Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 128
She lifted up her soft warm chin , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 54
No brush had touch'd his chin or razor sheer; Character of C.B., Line 7
Next Cottus: prone he lay, chin uppermost, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 49
 
CHINA.............2
My china closet too - with wretched nerves Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 14
A Faery Tale, by Lucy Vaughan Lloyd of China Walk, Lambeth The Jealousies, Subtitle
 
CHINK.............1
We are dead if that latchet gives one little chink . Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 18
 
CHIP..............2
And Miss Chip has kiss'd the sawyer, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 19
A chip hat had she on. Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 28
 
CHIPS.............1
Of moulted feathers, touchwood, alder chips , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 882
 
CHIRPING..........1
Great God of breathless cups and chirping mirth!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 236
 
CHIVALROUS........2
Of troops chivalrous prancing through a city, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 46
Their wings chivalrous into the clear air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 482
 
CHIVALRY..........5
Hadst thou liv'd when chivalry Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 41
Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry ; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 1
Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry ; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 11
Yet must I tell a tale of chivalry : Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 45
Yonder my chivalry , my pride of war, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 4


Published @ RC

March 2005