Co-Con - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
CO................2
Brother of Jove, and co -inheritor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 944
By Parpaglion and Co ., (those sly compeers The Jealousies, Line 88
 
COACH.............2
When Kate Eyebrow keeps a coach , Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 11
Therefore he call'd a coach , and bade it drive amain. The Jealousies, Line 225
 
COACHES...........3
It swallows chairmen, damns, and hackney coaches . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 15
Curricles, or mail- coaches , swift beyond compare." The Jealousies, Line 252
For press of coaches , that to-night here meet, The Jealousies, Line 259
 
COACHMAN..........1
And bade the coachman wheel to such a street, The Jealousies, Line 254
 
COAL..............1
And struck a lamp from the dismal coal , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 70
 
COALS.............3
Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid coals , To My Brothers, Line 1
For coals , and therefore no coals Betty brings. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 7
For coals, and therefore no coals Betty brings. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 7
 
COAST.............2
That, lingering along a pebbled coast , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 301
See the coast clear then. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 176c
 
COASTS............1
My skiff along green shelving coasts , to hear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 358
 
COAT..............2
In his coat There was a naughty boy, Line 46
"Alas, my friend! your coat sits very well: Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 18
 
COATS.............2
Through which the poppies show their scarlet coats ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 128
The scarlet coats that pester human-kind. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 130
 
COAX..............2
When 'twas their plan to coax her by degrees Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 167
To scrape a little favour, 'gan to coax The Jealousies, Line 698
 
COBWEBS...........1
Brushing the cobwebs with his lofty plume, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 110
 
COCKATRICE........1
You will come to again. O cockatrice , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 36
 
COELUS............2
Of Coelus , from the universal space, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 307
I, Coelus , wonder, how they came and whence; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 314
 
COERULEAN.........1
Through clouds of fleecy white, laughs the coerulean sky. Imitation of Spenser, Line 27
 
COEUS.............1
Coeus , and Gyges, and Briareus, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 19
 
COFFEE............1
"Mr. Nisby is of opinion that laced coffee is bad The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 365
 
COFFEE'S..........1
Have nantz, with which my morning- coffee's laced." The Jealousies, Line 365
 
COFFER............1
All the bright riches of my crystal coffer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 108
 
COFFIN............1
Of witch, and demon, and large coffin -worm, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 374
 
COFFIN'D..........1
To see scull, coffin'd bones, and funeral stole; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 356
 
COGITATION........1
But cogitation in his watery shades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 169
 
COIL..............3
Plump infant laughers mimicking the coil Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 247
In coil and wrangle. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 48
Good Hum, and let me view this mighty coil ." The Jealousies, Line 565
 
COIN..............2
Even as a miser balances his coin ; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
Days happy as the gold coin could invent Lamia, Part I, Line 313
 
COINAGE...........1
Than Midas of his coinage , let us be If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 11
 
COLD..............76
A half-blown flower, which cold blasts amate. Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 8
Who cannot feel for cold her tender feet, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 14
The stars look very cold about the sky, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 3
In other ages - cold and sacred busts Sleep and Poetry, Line 357
Cold as sunrise in September, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 7
The lark was lost in him; cold springs had run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 102
Benighted, close they huddled from the cold , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 391
Stems the upbursting cold : a wild rose tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 55
And when, more near against the marble cold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 265
Desponding, o'er the marble floor's cold thrill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 338
Content, O fool! to make a cold retreat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 465
Of nameless monster. A cold leaden awe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 136
Of weeds were cold beneath his cold thin feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 195
Of weeds were cold beneath his cold thin feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 195
In this cold region? Will he let me freeze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 259
I saw thee, and my blood no longer cold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 304
An urn of tears, as though thou wert cold dead; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 432
And merely given to the cold bleak air. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 553
Because I lov'd her?- Cold , O cold indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 623
Because I lov'd her?- Cold, O cold indeed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 623
'Twas vast, and desolate, and icy- cold ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 632
Press'd its cold hand, and wept,- and Scylla sigh'd! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 780
Speak not of grief, young stranger, or cold snails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 132
That thou mayst listen the cold dews among? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 163
Cold as my fears. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 187
And cold mushrooms; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 234
In the cold moonshine. Straight he seiz'd her wrist; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 508
Shew cold through watery pinions; make more bright Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 588
To die, when summer dies on the cold sward. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 936
The mountains blue, and cold near neighbour rills- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 36
"Love! thou art leading me from wintry cold , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 65
The seal on the cold ice with piteous bark Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 116
Bestride your steed while cold is in the skies. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 184
Lustre into the sun, and put cold doom Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 277
'Twas love; cold ,- dead indeed, but not dethroned. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 400
Through the cold serpent-pipe refreshfully,- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 412
Though beautiful, cold - strange - as in a dream On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 3
All is cold beauty; pain is never done On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 8
Or when grey clouds are thy cold coverlid? To Ailsa Rock, Line 8
On the marble cold and bare, Not Aladdin magian, Line 12
Still dumb, ungrateful Nevis - still so cold ! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 20
The owl, for all his feathers, was a- cold ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 2
Tears, at the thought of those enchantments cold , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 134
For aye unsought for slept among his ashes cold . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 378
Of unmatur'd green vallies cold , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 8
Not to pure Ida with its snow- cold skies, As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 7
Press'd her cold finger closer to her lips. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 14
O spectres busy in a cold , cold gloom! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 229
O spectres busy in a cold, cold gloom! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 229
Bestirr'd themselves, thrice horrible and cold ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 256
Cold as a bubbling well; let faint-lipp'd shells, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 19
On the cold hill's side. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 36
On the cold hill's side. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 44
Free from cold and every care Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 21
Couches warm as theirs is cold ? Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 70
I care not for cold or heat; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 75
As doth eternity: Cold Pastoral! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 45
To some securest lodging - cold perhaps! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 98
Peers with disrelish, grey, barren, and cold ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
The caitiff of the cold steel at his back. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 15
His most uneasy moments, when cold death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 14
Her arms are stiff,- her fingers clench'd and cold ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Page, Line 188
He did; not with cold wonder fearingly, Lamia, Part I, Line 247
Had felt the cold full sponge to pleasure press'd, Lamia, Part II, Line 192
At the mere touch of cold philosophy? Lamia, Part II, Line 230
'Twas icy, and the cold ran through his veins; Lamia, Part II, Line 251
Of what thou now art on that pavement cold . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 113
And was ascending quick to put cold grasp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 124
Slow, heavy, deadly was my pace: the cold The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 129
To her cold lips, and fill with such a light The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 280
Press'd her cold finger closer to her lips. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 318
Degraded, cold , upon the sodden ground The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 322
Smiling and cold and gay, To Fanny, Line 29
Of earnest grasping, would, if it were cold This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 2
To a cold dullard fay,- ah, woe betide! The Jealousies, Line 167
You do not like cold pig with Latin phrases, The Jealousies, Line 539
 
COLDER............1
Colder than the mortal death. Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 66
 
COLLECTED.........2
Of summer nights collected still to make Sleep and Poetry, Line 191
Collected silently in holes and corners, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
 
COLLECTEDLY.......1
To any one, answer, collectedly , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 17
 
COLLECTING........1
Collecting , mimick'd the wrought oaken beams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 623
 
COLLEGE...........1
As though in Cupid's college she had spent Lamia, Part I, Line 197
 
COLONELCY.........1
And give the colonelcy to Phalaric; The Jealousies, Line 149
 
COLONNADE.........1
Of some arch'd temple door, or dusky colonnade . Lamia, Part I, Line 361
 
COLOSSAL..........2
With stride colossal , on from hall to hall; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 195
With strides colossal , on from hall to hall; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 39
 
COLOUR............4
Full palatable; and a colour grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 767
Laws to my footsteps, colour to my cheek, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 714
We have no eloquence to colour justly Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 128
A fay of colour , slave from top to toe, The Jealousies, Line 182
 
COLOUR'D..........3
Of colour'd phantasy; for I fear 'twould trouble Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 642
As large, as bright, as colour'd as the bow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 850
This lily colour'd skull, with all O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 55
 
COLOURED..........1
Of eye-sight on cinque coloured potter's clay Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 60
 
COLOURS...........4
Of colours , wings, and bursts of spangly light; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 569
Some, Titian colours touch'd into real life. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 19
Would all their colours from the sunset take: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 68
The colours all inflam'd throughout her train, Lamia, Part I, Line 153
 
COLUMBINES........1
Savory, latter-mint, and columbines , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 576
 
COLUMN............4
The plain Doric column The Gothic looks solemn, Line 2
And thus a marble column do I build Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 160
Where 'gainst a column he leant thoughtfully Lamia, Part I, Line 316
Somewhere in the column headed letter B The Jealousies, Line 101
 
COLUMNS...........6
Of sapphire columns , or fantastic bridge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 238
Done heedlessly, those spouting columns rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 606
Through portal columns of a giant size, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 811
Mulciber's columns gleam in far piazzian line. Lamia, Part I, Line 212
Of columns north and south, ending in mist The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 84
Or round white columns wreath'd from capital to plinth. The Jealousies, Line 729
 
COLURE............1
Circles, and arcs, and broad-belting colure , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 274
 
COM'ST............1
Break through her weeping servants, till thou com'st Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 8
 
COMB..............3
She calm'd its wild hair with a golden comb , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 403
Comb ditto There was a naughty boy, Line 14
Till Miss's comb is made a pearl tiara, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 7
 
COMB'D............1
She drench'd away:- and still she comb'd , and kept Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 407
 
COMBINE...........2
And all the powers of song combine , Ode to Apollo, Line 43
So wingedly: when we combine therewith, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 813
 
COMBINED..........1
Who with combined powers, their wits employ'd To George Felton Mathew, Line 6
 
COMBING...........1
Of thy combing hand, the while it travelling cloys Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 968
 
COMBS.............2
That he will seize on trickling honey- combs : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 150
Large honey- combs of green, and freshly teem'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 667
 
COME..............98
O come , dearest Emma! the rose is full blown, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 1
Which every elf and fay had come to see: To George Felton Mathew, Line 28
And come like a clear sun-rise to my mind; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 50
Come to the earth; with an incline so sweet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 86
In which a spirit new come from the skies Calidore: A Fragment, Line 120
Come from the Galaxy: anon he sports,- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 5
These thoughts now come o'er me with all their might:- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 131
Upon the forehead of the age to come ; Addressed to the Same, Line 10
Wheel downward come they into fresher skies, Sleep and Poetry, Line 131
And when they're come , the very pleasant rout: Sleep and Poetry, Line 322
And with these airs come forms of elegance Sleep and Poetry, Line 331
His mighty voice may come upon the gale. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 56
And calmest thoughts come round us - as, of leaves After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 9
Come cool and suddenly against his face, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 6
Come hither all sweet maidens, soberly On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 1
That overtop your mountains; whether come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 199
That come a swooning over hollow grounds, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 286
The many that are come to pay their vows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 291
And come instead demurest meditation, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 975
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 2
Must such conviction come upon his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 35
Come with the constant dawn upon thy morrows? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 46
A hundred waterfalls, whose voices come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 242
Of sudden voices, echoing, " Come ! come! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 501
Of sudden voices, echoing, "Come! come ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 501
Death had come sudden; for no jot he mov'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 566
For quenchless burnings come upon the heart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 844
Sleep will come smoothly to my weary brow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 236
The which I breathe away, and thronging come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 336
The shepherd's pipe come clear from airy steep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 359
Upon my wild conjecturing: truth had come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 556
As newly come of heaven, dost thou sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 962
" Come hither, Sister of the Island!" Plain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 14
Come hither, lady fair, and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 226
Come hither, lady fair, and joined be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 237
" Come then, Sorrow! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 279
Of every ill: the man is yet to come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 522
So timidly among the stars: come hither! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 603
My love is still for thee. The hour may come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 657
Come hand in hand with one so beautiful. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 812
No tongue shall ask, whence come ye? but ye shall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 822
Where thou alone shalt come to me, and lave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 861
Come to-day, and come to-morrow, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 3
Come to-day, and come to-morrow, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 3
Till, in his soul dissolv'd, they come to be Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 7
Things all disjointed come from north and south, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 5
Come down, we pray thee, ere the hot sun count Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 187
And divine liquids come with odorous ooze Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 411
But their low voices are not heard, though come on travels drear; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 16
When shapes of old come striding by and visages of old, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 37
Come to pay devotion due- Not Aladdin magian, Line 33
Come to confession, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 28
Had come young Porphyro, with heart on fire The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 75
Had come to mock behind her back, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 87
At length her constant eyelids come The Eve of St. Mark, Line 115
When they were come unto the Faery's court When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 1
Would come in these like accents; O how frail Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 50
"This cheers our fallen house: come to our friends, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 150
O Saturn! come away, and give them heart; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 151
The shady visions come to domineer, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 244
Ere half this region-whisper had come down, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 349
Which by just right should come of mighty Gods; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 258
Would come no mystery? For me, dark, dark, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 86
Come with me, o'er tops of trees, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 48
For shade to shade will come too drowsily, Ode on Melancholy, Line 9
Beyond all pleasures past, and all to come : Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
Come , fair Auranthe, try if your soft hands Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 114
Why should he be so earnest? Come , my friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 131
I come to greet you as a loving son, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 78
Come close, and let me breathe into thine ear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 126
No more of her. Auranthe - Ludolph, come ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 152
Come in, and see. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 68a
As to my poor deserts. Come , come, be plain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 86
As to my poor deserts. Come, come , be plain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 86
Let him come in. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 57a
And, though it never come , be on my head Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 162
Juggler! May I come near you! On my soul Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 205
You will come to again. O cockatrice, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 36
Hear him! He calls you - sweet Auranthe, come ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 50
Come , let me lead you to our halls again! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 56
Now - one adieu for Albert!- Come away! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 60
A kind forbearance, holy abbot. Come , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 6
When dreadful guests would come to spoil her solitude. Lamia, Part II, Line 145
Come from the gloomy tun with merry shine. Lamia, Part II, Line 188
Louder they talk, and louder come the strains Lamia, Part II, Line 204
What am I that another death come not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 139
If by a chance into this fane they come , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 152
They come not here, they have no thought to come- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 165
They come not here, they have no thought to come - The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 165
Would come in this-like accenting; how frail The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 352
With such remorseless speed still come new woes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 366
I come - I see thee, as thou standest there, To Fanny, Line 7
Whence come you? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 28b
Come , lead me to this Mars - and let us move King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 51
Come on! Farewell my kingdom, and all hail King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 9
Come on! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 13
Come not near me, De Kaims, for by the price King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 22
Named Bertha; but her surname will not come , The Jealousies, Line 381
 
COMELINESS........1
Leaving, in naked comeliness , unshaded, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 615
 
COMELY............2
And feedeth still, more comely than itself? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 219
Now, while I speak to you, their comely heads Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 60
 
COMES.............36
And then, thou wilt know that the sigh comes from me. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 16
Comes thine alabaster steed; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 57
Or wherefore comes that steed so proudly by? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 46
Comes up with ripple, and with easy float, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 20
A sudden glow comes on them, nought they see To My Brother George (epistle), Line 21
It comes upon us like the glorious pealing To Kosciusko, Line 3
A sense of real things comes doubly strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 157
How silent comes the water round that bend; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 65
For a long dreary season, comes a day After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 2
A resting place, thus much comes clear and plain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 848
And yet my song comes native with the warmth; O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 10
And from them comes a silver flash of light Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 51
It comes in silence - now 'tis hidden all. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 60
The breath of Winter comes from far away, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 250
Comes from beyond the river to my bed: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 302
Comes articulate, and presseth Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 14
She comes , she comes again, like ring-dove fray'd and fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 198
She comes, she comes again, like ring-dove fray'd and fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 198
Which comes upon the silence, and dies off, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 77
Which comes of thought and musing: give us help!" Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 166
Now comes the pain of truth, to whom 'tis pain; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 202
Be cause of feud between us. See! he comes ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 119
Your hand - I go! Ha! here the thunder comes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 57
Ludolph, old Ethelbert, be sure, comes not Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107
Comes through the panes with persecuting glare. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 25
How shall I bear my life till Albert comes ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 91
Be speedy, darkness! Till that comes , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 182b
Comes from the pillow'd beauty of that fair Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 35
Seeing no Ludolph comes . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 66a
The remedy grows hopeless! Here he comes ,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 20
This way he comes , and if you would maintain King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Baldwin, Line 24
Here comes the testy brood. O for a sword! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 5
Can make his June December - here he comes . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 58
"He always comes down backward, with one shoe"- The Jealousies, Line 304
Comes from a play-thing of the Emperor's choice, The Jealousies, Line 332
When the time comes , don't feel the least alarm; The Jealousies, Line 520
 
COMET.............1
How like a comet he goes streaming on. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 17
 
COMFORT...........12
But thee to comfort a poor lonely maid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 287
And it shall comfort me within the tomb. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 304
His ancient mother, for some comfort yet. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 21
I have no comfort for thee, no not one: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 53
And in the proof much comfort will I give, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 179
If ye will take that comfort in its truth. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 180
Shrive him and comfort him at his last gasp, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 10
Have ye no comfort for me, ye physicians Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 2
Hath it not comfort in it? Would it not Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 13
His antient mother, for some comfort yet. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 326
I have no comfort for thee, no - not one: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 355
For it may comfort and console him much, The Jealousies, Line 123
 
COMFORTABLE.......5
With half-shut eyes and comfortable cheek, On The Story of Rimini, Line 2
O magic sleep! O comfortable bird, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 453
The comfortable green and juicy hay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 4
The comfortable sun. I was athirst Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 676
O bless'd asylum! Comfortable home! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 100
 
COMFORTED.........1
And let us be thus comforted ; unless Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1001
 
COMFORTING........1
But for her comforting ! unhappy sight, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 530
 
COMFORTINGS.......1
These things, with all their comfortings , are given Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 707
 
COMFORTS..........3
Nought comforts then the leafless grove Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 19
Let me awhile thy sweetest comforts borrow: To Hope, Line 22
Who comforts those she sees not, who knows not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 270
 
COMING............23
We hear around when Hesperus is coming . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 161
Coming sometimes like fearful claps of thunder, Sleep and Poetry, Line 27
The silence when some rhymes are coming out; Sleep and Poetry, Line 321
Coming into the blue with all her light. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 115
Coming with softest rustle through the trees; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 154
Coming ever to bless I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 184
Now coming from beneath the forest trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 148
And winnow from the coming step of time Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 819
Salt tears were coming , when I heard my name Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 963
From the clear moon, the trees, and coming madness. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 218
For some few hours the coming solitude." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 706
Is coming fresh upon me: O be kind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 181
Here's somebody coming , here's somebody coming! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 9
Here's somebody coming, here's somebody coming ! Over the hill and over the dale, Line 9
See what is coming from the distance dim! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 55
A coming down by craggis grey Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 3
The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 49
Who are these coming to the sacrifice? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 31
This coming night of banquets must not light Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
Lamia beheld him coming , near, more near- Lamia, Part I, Line 237
And, coming nearer, saw beside the shrine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 95
Coming down stairs,- by St. Bartholomew! The Jealousies, Line 301
April the twenty-fourth,- this coming day, The Jealousies, Line 501
 
COMMAND...........11
Press'd, saying: "Sister, I would have command , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 975
Thy thunder, conscious of the new command , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 60
Of the sky-children; I will give command : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 133
Awaiting for Hyperion's command . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 289
Of all these eyes; pr'ythee command me hence! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 112
Command an escort to the Friedburg lines. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
Sway'd by command , as corn is by the wind? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 19
And, in the name of mercy, give command Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 188
I command ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 36c
Thy thunder, captious at the new command , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 362
About you,- feel your pockets, I command ,- The Jealousies, Line 601
 
COMMANDED.........2
Fain would he have commanded , fain took throne Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 290
Sway'd here and there, commanded to and fro, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 2
 
COMMANDER.........1
" Commander of the faithful!" answer'd Hum, The Jealousies, Line 361
 
COMMANDS..........1
Sent forth with my commands ? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 73a
 
COMMENCE..........1
"Let us commence ," Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 744b
 
COMMENTED.........1
High commented with smiles. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 128a
 
COMMENTS..........1
I have mine own particular comments on't; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 43
 
COMMINGLING.......3
Gently commingling , gives tremendous birth To Kosciusko, Line 12
Commingling with her argent spheres did roll Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 595
The mere commingling of passionate breath, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 833
 
COMMISSION'D......2
Thou art commission'd to this fated spot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 298
Fancy, high- commission'd :- send her! Fancy, Line 27
 
COMMIT............1
Nor may I be thy love. We might commit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 757
 
COMMITMENT........1
In self- commitment , thus that meek unknown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 874
 
COMMITTED.........1
Committed to the darkness and the gloom: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 660
 
COMMON............24
So near those common folk; did not their shames Sleep and Poetry, Line 211
The black tassell'd trencher and common hat; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 9
To common lookers on, like one who dream'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 176
Came not by common growth. Thus on I thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 564
Were her fair limbs, and like a common weed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 624
Even for common bulk, those olden three, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 848
O feel as if it were a common day; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 820
Towards common thoughts and things for very fear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 896
That noises are a common thing All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 51
And common Wellingtons turn Romeo boots; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 8
Should be more common than the growth of weeds. And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 14
Or hear the voice of busy common -sense! Ode on Indolence, Line 40
With common thousands, into shallow graves. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 129
Lifted you from the crowd of common men Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 48
'Twas with some people out of common reach; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 43
Nay open speech, rude mockery grown common , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 131
Ere, by one grasp, this common hand is made Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 86
To listen with no common interest; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 53
And show to common eyes these secret bowers? Lamia, Part II, Line 149
His young disciple. "'Tis no common rule, Lamia, Part II, Line 164
In the dull catalogue of common things. Lamia, Part II, Line 233
Thy flesh, near cousin to the common dust, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 109
Doubled into a common fist, went grand, The Jealousies, Line 350
The Common Council and my fool Lord Mayor The Jealousies, Line 768
 
COMMONER..........1
That vulgar commoner , Esquire Biancopany? The Jealousies, Line 162
 
COMMONS...........1
And damn'd his House of Commons , in complete chagrin. The Jealousies, Line 135
 
COMMOTIONS........1
Soon wild commotions shook him, and made flush Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 124
 
COMMUN'D..........1
Forgot all violence, and but commun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 867
 
COMMUNE...........2
To commune with those orbs, once more I rais'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 600
Yes, and those of heaven commune Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 5
 
COMPACT...........2
In form and shape compact and beautiful, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 209
Compact in steeled squares, and speared files, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 162
 
COMPANIES.........2
Young companies nimbly began dancing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 313
With staid and pious companies , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 15
 
COMPANION.........2
Not to companion thee, and sigh away Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 135
Will trespass down those cheeks. Companion fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 870
 
COMPANION'D.......1
Companion'd or alone; while many a light Lamia, Part I, Line 357
 
COMPANIONS........2
The sweet companions that await on thee; On Peace, Line 6
From his companions , and set forth to walk, Lamia, Part I, Line 231
 
COMPANIONSHIP.....2
But far from such companionship to wear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 291
In will, in action free, companionship , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 210
 
COMPANY...........7
In telling of this goodly company , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 129
The next is snoring in their company ; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 27
Albert, go thou and bear him company . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 156
Fiends keep you company ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 183a
A splendid company ! rare beauties here! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 22
She shall be brought before this company , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 97
In husband's company , but still employ'd The Jealousies, Line 113
 
COMPARE...........2
What is it? And to what shall I compare it? Sleep and Poetry, Line 23
Curricles, or mail-coaches, swift beyond compare ." The Jealousies, Line 252
 
COMPARING.........1
Comparing , joyfully, their plenteous stores Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 389
 
COMPARISON........2
Half-happy, by comparison of bliss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 371
Should cower beneath what, in comparison , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 154
 
COMPARISONS.......2
But these comparisons are nothing worth. To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 8
Making comparisons of earthly things; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 3
 
COMPASS...........3
And compass vile: so that ye taught a school Sleep and Poetry, Line 196
When one can compass it. Auranthe, try Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 46
And, Stephen, I must compass it- King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 34a
 
COMPASSING........1
Nought earthly worth my compassing ; so stand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 162
 
COMPASSION........2
Any compassion for that Emperor's niece, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 46
I took compassion on her, bade her steep Lamia, Part I, Line 106
 
COMPEERS..........1
By Parpaglion and Co., (those sly compeers The Jealousies, Line 88
 
COMPEL............1
A hand was at my shoulder to compel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 604
 
COMPETENT.........1
I have to conciliate men who are competent to look, and who do look with a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
 
COMPLAIN..........3
That fierce complain to silence: where I stumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 488
The amorous promise of her lone complain , Lamia, Part I, Line 288
Continued to lament and to complain , The Jealousies, Line 75
 
COMPLAIN'D........2
And yet she answer'd not, only complain'd , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 249
Once he complain'd of weariness. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Gersa, Line 48a
 
COMPLAININGS......1
Those looks immortal, those complainings dear! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 313
 
COMPLAINT.........1
Skulks to his cavern, 'mid the gruff complaint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 952
 
COMPLAISANT.......1
And the moon, whether prudish or complaisant , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 13
 
COMPLETE..........12
Complete my joy - let not my first wish fail, On Peace, Line 7
Or more complete to overwhelm surmise? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 522
A mimic temple, so complete and true Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 257
Go thither quick and so complete my joy. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 56
The teeth complete , so white and small, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 56
Sandals more interwoven and complete If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 5
I spring complete Minerva! But the Prince- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 97
She had a woman's mouth with all its pearls complete : Lamia, Part I, Line 60
Love, jealous grown of so complete a pair, Lamia, Part II, Line 12
Complete and ready for the revels rude, Lamia, Part II, Line 144
Remember'd it from childhood all complete Lamia, Part II, Line 153
And damn'd his House of Commons, in complete chagrin. The Jealousies, Line 135
 
COMPLETED.........2
Whence that completed form of all completeness? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 606
Completed by her twin-arch'd ebon-brows; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 63
 
COMPLETELY........4
His spirit flies before him so completely . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 63
But thou to please wert nurtured so completely To G.A.W., Line 11
Bard art thou completely ! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 48
Bard art thou completely !- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 51
 
COMPLETENESS......1
Whence that completed form of all completeness ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 606
 
COMPLETION........5
feel sensible are not of such completion as to warrant their passing the press; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
By the most soft completion of thy face, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 757
After the full completion of fair day,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 191
Completion of all delicate nature's wit! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 36
After the full completion of fair day, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 35
 
COMPLETIONS.......1
All its completions - be quickly near, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 260
 
COMPLIMENT........1
Without your paying me one compliment . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 5
 
COMPLYING.........1
There is for madness - cruel or complying ? Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 6
 
COMPRIZED.........1
By blinded Lycius, so in her comprized . Lamia, Part I, Line 347
 
COMPULSION........1
Unus'd to bend, by hard compulsion bent Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 300
 
COMUS.............1
Just fresh from the banquet of Comus ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 20
 
CONCAVE...........1
He saw far in the concave green of the sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 191
 
CONCEAL'D.........1
Will sharpen more the longer 'tis conceal'd . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 73
 
CONCEALING........1
The names of heroes, burst from clouds concealing , To Kosciusko, Line 6
 
CONCEALMENT.......1
'Tis a concealment needful in extreme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 576
 
CONCEALS..........1
Or from old Skiddaw's top, when fog conceals Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 394
 
CONCEIT...........1
Fever'd his high conceit of such a bride, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 46
 
CONCEITS..........1
Gentle and tender, full of soft conceits , The Jealousies, Line 633
 
CONCEIVE..........3
I love thee, youth, more than I can conceive ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 774
And she would not conceive it. Timid thing! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 403
Could not conceive what Coralline was at- The Jealousies, Line 672
 
CONCEIVED.........1
Such dim- conceived glories of the brain On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 9
 
CONCEIVES.........1
She sings but to her love, nor e'er conceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 830
 
CONCEIVING........1
To clear conceiving : yet there ever rolls Sleep and Poetry, Line 290
 
CONCEPTION........2
Conception to the very bourne of heaven, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 295
Could figure out and to conception bring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 577
 
CONCEPTIONS.......1
Vexing conceptions of some sudden change; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 236
 
CONCERNING........3
Ink'd purple with a song concerning dying; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 43
Concerning what will make that sin-worn cheek Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 27
Concerning whom or what? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 60b
 
CONCHED...........1
Even into thine own soft- conched ear: Ode to Psyche, Line 4
 
CONCHS............1
Among the conchs and shells of the lofty grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 921
 
CONCILIATE........1
I have to conciliate men who are competent to look, and who do look with a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
 
CONCLAVE..........1
To thin the scarlet conclave of old men, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 50
 
CONDEMN'D.........2
And cradled me in roses. Thus condemn'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 457
How in the Council you condemn'd this war, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 147
 
CONDESCEND........2
In this dark city, nor would condescend To George Felton Mathew, Line 33
To hear you condescend to ribbald-phrase. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 90
 
CONDOLES..........2
That aye at fall of night our care condoles . To My Brothers, Line 8
The generous Earl condoles in his mishaps, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 41
 
CONDOLING.........2
Ah! you list to the nightingale's tender condoling , To Some Ladies, Line 11
Condoling with Prince Ludolph. In fit time Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 72
 
CONDUCT...........4
His gentlemen conduct me with all care Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 97
I cannot square my conduct to time, place, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 3
Unseen conduct him to me: but I fear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 23
Vile strictures on the conduct of a prince The Jealousies, Line 470
 
CONDUCTING........1
Conducting to the throne high canopied. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 16
 
CONE..............1
To alleys where the fir-tree drops its cone , On The Story of Rimini, Line 13
 
CONES.............1
With silvery oak apples, and fir cones brown- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 276
 
CONFER............2
We meet again to-day, and can confer Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 45
You would confer with;- me? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 46a
 
CONFERENCE........2
Fair Scylla and her guides to conference ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 894
And many a jealous conference had they, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 169
 
CONFESS...........9
Our by-gone quarrels, I confess my heart Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 22
I confess Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 44b
I must confess ,- and cut my throat,- to-day? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 31
Confess , or by the wheel- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 160b
I will confess , O holy abbot!- How! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 99
Tell me,- the league of devils? Confess - confess- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
Tell me,- the league of devils? Confess - confess - Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
Men shall confess ,- this prince was gull'd and cheated, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 133
Where the heart beats: confess - 'tis nothing new- To Fanny, Line 35
 
CONFESSION........2
Come to confession , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 28
Not to thine ear alone I make confession , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 173
 
CONFESSIONAL......1
Put to the torture for confessional ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 24
 
CONFIDANT.........1
Quoth Corallina, nurse and confidant , The Jealousies, Line 47
 
CONFIDE...........2
For to thy tongue will I all health confide . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 864
To do an honest deed. Shall I confide -? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 37
 
CONFIDING.........1
'Tis not confiding in a broken reed, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 33
 
CONFINED..........1
Beyond its proper bound, yet still confined ,- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 79
 
CONFINES..........2
Of flesh and bone, curbs, and confines , and frets Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 21
Beyond the seeming confines of the space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 513
 
CONFLICTING.......1
Look'd up: a conflicting of shame and ruth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 761
 
CONFOUND..........1
Melodious howsoever, can confound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 80
 
CONFOUNDED........2
I've had a damn'd confounded ugly dream, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 26
May be confounded and abash'd withal, Lamia, Part II, Line 58
 
CONFOUNDS.........1
Thick night confounds the pine-tops with the clouds: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 80
 
CONFUS'D..........1
All in a mingled heap confus'd there lay The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 78
 
CONFUSION.........1
But no confusion , no disturbance rude How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 7
 
CONGEES...........1
Congees and scape-graces of every sort, The Jealousies, Line 759
 
CONGRATULATE......1
To thank thee; here congratulate each other; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 250
 
CONGREGATED.......2
Whose congregated majesty so fills Sleep and Poetry, Line 208
Of all the congregated world, to fan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 818
 
CONJECTURE........1
We are without conjecture ; not a soul Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 274
 
CONJECTURED.......1
Conjectured , on the instant, it might be The Jealousies, Line 678
 
CONJECTURES.......1
conjectures , found her out to be a serpent, a lamia; and that all her furniture Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
CONJECTURING......1
Upon my wild conjecturing : truth had come Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 556
 
CONJURATION.......1
No sooner had this conjuration pass'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 291
 
CONJURE...........1
Conjure thee to receive our humble paean, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 305
 
CONJURER'S........1
A conjurer's spirits, what cup will you drain? The Jealousies, Line 359
 
CONJURING.........1
Without a little conjuring ." "'Tis Pearl, The Jealousies, Line 382
 
CONJUROR..........1
God's help! my lady fair the conjuror plays The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 124
 
CONN'D............1
And in his lap a book, the which he conn'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 214
 
CONNOISSEURING....1
Admired it with a connoisseuring look, The Jealousies, Line 417
 
CONQUER...........2
Go! conquer Italy! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 156a
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line, Lamia, Part II, Line 235
 
CONQUER'D.........3
So play'd, so charm'd, so conquer'd , so bereft As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 4
Thereby more conquer'd , than by us the rule Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 216
For when the conquer'd lion is once dungeoned, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 170
 
CONQUERING........6
With the conquering sun of spring, and left the skies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 921
Then came a conquering earth-thunder, and rumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 487
A conquering ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 223
For my own sullen conquering : to him Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 619
Num of all conquering , All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 54
Its poison in the eyes of conquering Jove. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 48
 
CONQUEROR.........2
My conqueror ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 107a
Pause but one moment, mighty conqueror , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
 
CONQUERORS........1
Our conquerors to mourn as we do now. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 231
 
CONRAD............38
CONRAD , Duke of Franconia Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 3
Enter CONRAD . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Conrad ! what tidings? Good, if I may guess Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 17
I pr'ythee, Conrad , do not overact Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 30
His right hand, his brave Conrad ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 44a
[Exeunt CONRAD and AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 144
[Enter CONRAD , from the Castle, attended by two Knights and Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
Aye, Conrad , it will pluck out all grey hairs; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 7
More thanks, good Conrad ; for, except my son's, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 43
Not so tedious, Conrad . No, no, no, no,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 81
Conrad , with all due ceremony, give Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 154
To prop my empire's dome. Conrad , in thee Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 161
Conrad , I owe thee much. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 179a
stage, bowing with respect to LUDOLPH, he frowning on them. CONRAD follows. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
[Exit CONRAD . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 56
Enter OTHO and CONRAD . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 60
Conrad , we would be private! Sigifred! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 71
[Exeunt CONRAD and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 73
O cursed Conrad ! devilish Auranthe! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 4
"To the Duke Conrad . Forget the threat you Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
CONRAD , Nobles, Knights, Ladies, etc., etc., etc. Music. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
(to Conrad ) Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 26b
Conrad , if he flames longer in this wise Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 46
Conrad , see all depart not wanted here. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 102
Conrad , be they in your safe custody, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 238
AURANTHE and CONRAD discovered. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Conrad , hold! I would not bear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 59b
But, Conrad , now be gone; the host is look'd for; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 68
Conrad ! Albert! help! help! What can I do? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 76
Conrad ,- traitor! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 159b
[Enter CONRAD . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 160
For loving Conrad , see you fawn on him. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 175
Enter CONRAD and AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
To pray thee far away! Conrad , go! go!- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 6
Go, go,- no blood! no blood!- go, gentle Conrad ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 9
[Exit CONRAD . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D.a to Line 16
Done to another,- Conrad has it home! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 6
Of Albert and Duke Conrad ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 5a
 
CONRAD'S..........6
AURANTHE, Conrad's Sister Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 15
To-day, at the Duke Conrad's , where he keeps Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 92
By heavens, I'd rather kiss Duke Conrad's slipper, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 13
This Conrad's gates, to the wide air again. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 84
Conrad's sword, his corslet, and his helm, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 69
For the Duke Conrad's . Close I follow'd them Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 124
 
CONS..............1
To tint her pallid cheek with bloom, who cons Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 368
 
CONSCIENCE........8
Of conscience bids me be more calm awhile. Sleep and Poetry, Line 305
But sickness smites the conscience sore; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 50
Save me from curious conscience , that still hoards Sonnet to Sleep, Line 11
And opiate for the conscience have I none! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 158
Of conscience , for their long offended might, Lamia, Part II, Line 284
And thou be conscience -calm'd. See, here it is- This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 7
It goes against your conscience - good! Well, don't. The Jealousies, Line 462
(I've got a conscience , maugre people's jokes:) The Jealousies, Line 697
 
CONSCIOUS.........2
To be conscious of such a coronet. On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 8
Thy thunder, conscious of the new command, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 60
 
CONSCIOUSNESS.....2
The goal of consciousness ? Ah, 'tis the thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 283
Shed balmy consciousness within that bower. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 466
 
CONSECRATE........1
My future days to her fane consecrate ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 888
 
CONSECRATED.......1
And, silent as a consecrated urn, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 32
 
CONSENT...........1
Hath given consent that you should marry Ludolph! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 87
 
CONSENTED.........1
And, all subdued, consented to the hour Lamia, Part II, Line 82
 
CONSIDER..........1
Stop and consider ! life is but a day; Sleep and Poetry, Line 85
 
CONSOLATION.......1
Give consolation in this woe extreme. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 242
 
CONSOLE...........2
Console my poor boy, cheer him, heal his spirits? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 14
For it may comfort and console him much, The Jealousies, Line 123
 
CONSPIRACY........1
In a dark conspiracy Fancy, Line 23
 
CONSPIRATOR.......1
I was a mad conspirator , chiefly too Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 141
 
CONSPIRED.........1
Has my own soul conspired : so my story Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 644
 
CONSPIRING........1
Conspiring with him how to load and bless To Autumn, Line 3
 
CONSTANT..........11
Come with the constant dawn upon thy morrows? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 46
Those same full fringed lids a constant blind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 563
But by a patient wing, a constant spell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 24
The sea-gulls not more constant ; for I had Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 321
She is so constant to me, and so kind: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 178
But ah! she is so constant and so kind. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 181
And constant as her vespers would he watch, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 21
Of brother's eyes, of sister's brow, constant to every place; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 34
At length her constant eyelids come The Eve of St. Mark, Line 115
Pouring a constant bulk, uncertain where. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 9
It works a constant change, which happy death The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 259
 
CONSTANTLY........1
Wide o'er the swelling streams: and constantly Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 365
 
CONSTRAIN'D.......1
Let us find out, if we must be constrain'd , If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 4
 
CONSULT...........1
We must consult upon our terms of peace. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 159
 
CONSUMED..........1
But, when I am consumed in the fire, On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 13
 
CONSUMES..........1
"O ye, whom wrath consumes ! who, passion-stung, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 173
 
CONSUMING.........1
By one consuming flame: it doth immerse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 369
 
CONSUMMATE........1
How to consummate all. The youth elect Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 710
 
CONSUMMATION......2
Of a peculiar sort,- a consummation ;- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 106
This mighty consummation made, the host Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 828
 
CONTACT...........1
Their points of contact , and swift counterchange; Lamia, Part I, Line 194
 
CONTAIN...........1
His heart is full, it can contain no more, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 23
 
CONTAIN'D.........1
Endymion: woe! woe! is grief contain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 823
 
CONTAINETH........1
For it containeth twenty thousand punks, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 17
 
CONTEMPLATING.....2
Who thus were ripe for high contemplating Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 355
I sat contemplating the figures wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 886
 
CONTEMPLATIVE.....1
He utter'd, while his hands contemplative Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 377
 
CONTEMPT..........2
He lean'd; not rising, from supreme contempt . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 308
Gruff with contempt ; which a death-nighing moan Lamia, Part II, Line 292
 
CONTEND...........1
He heard but the last words, nor could contend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 215
 
CONTENDING........1
For what a height my spirit is contending ! On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 13
 
CONTENT...........33
Who is more happy, when, with heart's content , To one who has been long in city pent, Line 5
Happy is England! I could be content Happy is England! I could be content, Line 1
Should it e'er be so, what a rich content ! To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 83
'Tis not content so soon to be alone. On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 14
Than the proud laurel shall content my bier. To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 4
Could at this moment be content to lie This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 12
I shall die content . Hither, hither, love, Line 24
Whither his brethren, bleating with content , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 71
Have been content to let occasion die, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 822
Their measure of content ; what merest whim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 846
He was content to let her amorous plea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 462
Faint through his careless arms; content to see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 463
Content , O fool! to make a cold retreat, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 465
Where will the splendour be content to reach? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 91
Could not thy harshest vengeance be content , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 621
Dost weep for me? Then should I be content . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 119
Hast thou felt so content : a grievous feud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 547
Far wandering, they were perforce content Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 766
Let it content thee, sister, seeing me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 858
Wilt be content to dwell with her, to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 871
Are folded up, and he content to look Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 10
"You seem there in the quiet of content , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 181
By bards who died content in pleasant sward, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 7
Content as theirs, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 13
Hot to their Councils, scarce content O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 9
I see, astonied, that severe content Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 165
How ye, perforce, must be content to stoop: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 178
Who have not learnt to be content without her; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 6
Ye have none better? No, I am content ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 81
She's gone! I am content - nobles, good night! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 192
Without the aid of love; yet in content Lamia, Part I, Line 314
content , and at last married Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Praying his royal senses to content The Jealousies, Line 21
 
CONTENTED.........5
"Why was I not contented ? Wherefore reach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 372
This murky phantasm! thou contented seem'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 466
And pledging with contented smack Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 21
Contented fools causes for discontent, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 40
In pale contented sort of discontent, Lamia, Part II, Line 135
 
CONTENTMENT.......3
Sluggishly by, ere more contentment swept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 916
Than sighs could fathom, or contentment reach: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 395
Ripe fruits, and lonely couch, contentment gave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 968
 
CONTENTS..........1
But, finding in our green earth sweet contents , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 313
 
CONTINUAL.........2
And his continual voice was pleasanter Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 13
Her brethren, noted the continual shower Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 452
 
CONTINUALLY.......2
In long perspective, and continually Sleep and Poetry, Line 100
And the sick west continually bereaves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 251
 
CONTINUED.........3
continued for a few minutes before he thus began,) Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
Continued to lament and to complain, The Jealousies, Line 75
While Hum continued , shamming half a sob,- The Jealousies, Line 412
 
CONTINUING........2
Her lucid bow, continuing thus: "Drear, drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 988
So answer'd I, continuing , "If it please, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 186
 
CONTINUOUS........2
Wide sea, that one continuous murmur breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 16
My sports were lonely, 'mid continuous roars, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 340
 
CONTRADICTIONS....1
'Mid contradictions her delights to lend. To George Felton Mathew, Line 34
 
CONTRIV'D.........1
Yet they contriv'd to steal the basil-pot, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 473
 
CONTRIVANCES......1
He must be sav'd by fine contrivances ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 20
 
CONTRIVE..........4
Intreated, managed! When can you contrive Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 20
Peace! nor contrive thy mistress' ire to rouse," The Jealousies, Line 61
But how in the world can I contrive to stun The Jealousies, Line 158
Sometime to-day I must contrive a minute, The Jealousies, Line 618
 
CONTROLS..........1
Endymion feels it, and no more controls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 545
 
CONTUMELIES.......1
Tired out, and weary-worn with contumelies . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 116
 
CONTUMELIOUS......1
Had he, though blindly contumelious , brought Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 285
 
CONVENIENCE.......1
For your convenience , and her dear nerves' sake; The Jealousies, Line 491
 
CONVENIENTLY......1
His mouth being held conveniently fit The Jealousies, Line 421
 
CONVENT...........3
You may have grown from convent libraries, Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 2
A longer skein of wit in Convent Garden. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 4
Sir, Convent Garden is a monstrous beast; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 9
 
CONVENTS..........1
What, have you convents in that Gothic isle? Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 7
 
CONVERSATION......1
In a finger conversation with my mutes,- The Jealousies, Line 356
 
CONVERSE..........6
Yet the sweet converse of an innocent mind, O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 10
Sweet too the converse of these happy mortals, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 158
Yet shall my spirit lofty converse hold To My Brother George (epistle), Line 72
And converse high of those with glory crown'd. Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 8
Anon they wander'd, by divine converse , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 371
Nor did speed hinder converse soft and strange- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 488
 
CONVEY............3
Their cradling arms, and purpos'd to convey Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1017
" Convey her to me, Hum, or by my crown, The Jealousies, Line 406
For on that eve alone can you the maid convey ." The Jealousies, Line 504
 
CONVEY'D..........2
Truly I should not like to be convey'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 35
Convey'd in little solder'd pipes by stealth, The Jealousies, Line 212
 
CONVICTION........3
the conviction that there is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Must such conviction come upon his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 35
Whether through poz'd conviction , or disdain, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 244
 
CONVINC'D.........1
You are convinc'd ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 148a
 
CONVINCE..........2
In short, convince you that however wise Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 1
Now I think on't, perhaps I could convince The Jealousies, Line 473
 
CONVOLUTING.......1
Its mighty self of convoluting sound, Sleep and Poetry, Line 175
 
CONVOLVULUS.......1
Convolvulus in streaked vases flush; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 415
 
CONVULS'D.........8
Convuls'd and headlong! Stay! an inward frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 304
Nestling a rose, convuls'd as though it smarted Sleep and Poetry, Line 344
Lay dormant, mov'd convuls'd and gradually Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 499
With convuls'd clenches waving it abroad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 231
Ring-doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
Making slow way, with head and neck convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 262
Heaving in pain, and horribly convuls'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 27
She writh'd about, convuls'd with scarlet pain: Lamia, Part I, Line 154
 
CONVULSE..........1
As hot as death's is chill, with fierce convulse Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 129
 
CONVULSED.........1
Their horses homeward, with convulsed spur, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 223
 
CONVULSEST........1
All scope of thought, convulsest my heart's blood Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 78
 
CONVULSION........1
Convulsion to a mouth of many years? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 287


Published @ RC

March 2005