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Keats Concordance
 
COO...............1
The stockdove shall hatch her soft brace and shall coo , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 23
 
COOETH............1
Because it cooeth , and hath snowy wings Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 222
 
COOINGLY..........1
Passion their voices cooingly 'mong myrtles, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 248
 
COOINGS...........1
They will be found softer than ring-dove's cooings . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 64
 
COOK..............1
Kill'd a man- cook , a page, and broke a jar, The Jealousies, Line 669
 
COOKS.............2
A promenade for cooks and ancient ladies; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 13
Eban, untempted by the pastry- cooks , The Jealousies, Line 217
 
COOL..............38
He bares his forehead to the cool blue sky, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 6
Yet feel I little of the cool bleak air, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 5
May fan the cool air gently o'er my rest; Sleep and Poetry, Line 112
Moist, cool and green; and shade the violets, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 33
And cool themselves among the em'rald tresses; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 82
The while they cool themselves, they freshness give, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 83
Than e'er reflected in its pleasant cool I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 168
Come cool and suddenly against his face, This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 6
To whose cool bosom she was used to bring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 433
And cloister'd among cool and bunched leaves- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 829
Some moulder'd steps lead into this cool cell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 869
Through the cool depth.- It moved as if to flee- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 897
She dabbles, on the cool and sluicy sands: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 946
All records, saving thine, come cool , and calm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 2
Lay, half asleep, in grass and rushes cool , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 134
Cool grass, nor tasted the fresh slumberous air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 290
O let me cool it the zephyr-boughs among! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 318
So cool a purple: taste these juicy pears, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 444
Alive, and dazzling cool , and with a sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 609
With fingers cool as aspen leaves. Sweet love, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 804
To a sleeping lake, whose cool and level gleam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 833
Ready to snort their streams. In this cool wonder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 885
Such cool and sorrowful offerings, thou art fond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 438
Among cool clouds and winds, but that the free, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 351
Cool parsley, basil sweet, and sunny thyme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 577
By every lull to cool her infant's pain: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 36
Was cool There was a naughty boy, Line 48
In cool mid-forest. Surely I have traced Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 55
And see my cool sedge-buried urn, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 32
'Mid hush'd, cool -rooted flowers, fragrant-eyed, Ode to Psyche, Line 13
My head cool -bedded in the flowery grass; Ode on Indolence, Line 52
The cool wine, kiss'd off with a soldier's smack: Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 30
Men, women, rich and poor, in the cool hours, Lamia, Part I, Line 355
Nibble their toasts, and cool their tea with sighs, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 2
Stood a cool vessel of transparent juice, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 42
In midmost Ind, beside Hydaspes cool , The Jealousies, Line 1
Nor rested till they stood to cool , and fan, The Jealousies, Line 322
But let me cool your brandy with a little wine." The Jealousies, Line 414
 
COOL'D............4
The languid sick; it cool'd their fever'd sleep, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 223
Till thou hadst cool'd their cheeks deliciously: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 148
And back retir'd, not cool'd by high disdain; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 61
Cool'd a long age in the deep-delved earth, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 12
 
COOLER............3
Dried carefully on the cooler side of sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 439
There was a cooler light; and so he kept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1019
Cooler than all the wonders he had seen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1030
 
COOLEST...........1
The channels where my coolest waters flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 991
 
COOLING...........5
The air was cooling , and so very still, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 2
And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 3
That for themselves a cooling covert make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 17
And cooling the drouth For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 10
Flash'd phosphor and sharp sparks, without one cooling tear. Lamia, Part I, Line 152
 
COOLNESS..........7
In the coolness of the morn. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 34
Temper'd with coolness . How they ever wrestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 75
The eyelids with the passing coolness play, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 7
Their summer coolness : pent up butterflies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 258
Its tempering coolness , to my life akin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 609
A bitter coolness ; the ripe grape is sour: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 35
In fragrance soft, and coolness to the eye, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 210
 
COOMB.............1
And Coomb at the clear Teign head- For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 3
 
COOP'D............1
Straying about, yet coop'd up in the den Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 928
 
COPE..............1
Came gold around me, cheering me to cope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 686
 
COPIED............1
from Bayle's Dictionary, and had copied a long Latin note from that work. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
COPIOUS...........4
A copious spring; and both together dash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 919
A blush of coral. Copious wonder-draughts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 843
Behold!"- Two copious tear-drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
Turn to the copious index, you will find The Jealousies, Line 100
 
COPSE.............2
This pleasant tale is like a little copse : This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 1
Through copse -clad vallies,- ere their death, o'ertaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 120
 
COPY..............1
Whence I may copy many a lovely saying Sleep and Poetry, Line 65
 
CORAL.............8
When he upswimmeth from the coral caves, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 51
Coral tinted teach no blisses, You say you love; but with a voice, Line 12
More than coral in the sea- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 13
Gurgling in beds of coral : for anon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 640
Ribb'd and inlaid with coral , pebble, and pearl. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 629
Smiling beneath a coral diadem, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 776
A blush of coral . Copious wonder-draughts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 843
To visit dolphin- coral in deep seas. To Homer, Line 4
 
CORALLINA.........1
Quoth Corallina , nurse and confidant, The Jealousies, Line 47
 
CORALLINE.........2
"Ah, beauteous mortal!" "Hush!" quoth Coralline , The Jealousies, Line 64
Could not conceive what Coralline was at- The Jealousies, Line 672
 
CORDELIA'S........1
More serene than Cordelia's countenance? Sleep and Poetry, Line 9
 
CORDIAL...........1
Who let me taste that more than cordial dram, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 64
 
CORDIALLY.........1
No, nor till cordially you shook my hand To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 121
 
CORDS.............2
Whose cords are solid rays, and twinkle radiant fires. Ode to Apollo, Line 6
Loop'd up with cords of twisted wreathed light, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 38
 
CORE..............9
Now I have tasted her sweet soul to the core Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 904
Into the dungeon core of that wild wood: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 565
Will you play once more, at nice cut- core , O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 13
But I saw too distinct into the core Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 96
Until her heart felt pity to the core Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 378
And moisten'd it with tears unto the core . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 424
Young buds sleep in the root's white core . Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 4
Of love deep learned to the red heart's core : Lamia, Part I, Line 190
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core ; To Autumn, Line 6
 
CORINTH...........10
I love a youth of Corinth - O the bliss! Lamia, Part I, Line 119
Who go on to Corinth from Cenchreas' shore; Lamia, Part I, Line 174
To Corinth from the shore; for freshly blew Lamia, Part I, Line 222
Perhaps grown wearied of their Corinth talk: Lamia, Part I, Line 232
Her face so long in Corinth , where, she said, Lamia, Part I, Line 311
And last, pointing to Corinth , ask'd her sweet, Lamia, Part I, Line 342
As men talk in a dream, so Corinth all, Lamia, Part I, Line 350
My presence in wide Corinth hardly known: Lamia, Part II, Line 93
twenty-five years of age, that going betwixt Cenchreas and Corinth , met such a Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
suburbs of Corinth , and told him she was a Phoenician by birth, and if he would Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
CORINTH'S.........1
Amid the hoarse alarm of Corinth's voice. Lamia, Part II, Line 61
 
CORINTHIAN........1
She saw the young Corinthian Lycius Lamia, Part I, Line 216
 
CORINTHIANS.......2
Corinthians ! look upon that gray-beard wretch! Lamia, Part II, Line 287
Around his demon eyes! Corinthians , see! Lamia, Part II, Line 289
 
CORN..............9
To see high, golden corn wave in the light To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 92
In woven baskets bringing ears of corn , To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 6
Their fairest blossom'd beans and poppied corn ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 255
When snouted wild-boars routing tender corn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 282
Across the gold autumn's whole kingdoms of corn ? Apollo to the Graces, Line 6
Rustle of the reaped corn ; Fancy, Line 41
She stood in tears amid the alien corn ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 67
Sway'd by command, as corn is by the wind? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 19
For all corn ! thou snail-creeper to and fro, The Jealousies, Line 236
 
CORNER............2
Into some backward corner of the brain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 11
This corner holds at least a score, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 92
 
CORNERS...........2
By the melancholy corners of that mouth. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 396
Collected silently in holes and corners , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 48
 
CORNICE...........1
Star'd, where upon their heads the cornice rests, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 35
 
CORNICED..........1
Or found them cluster'd in the corniced shade Lamia, Part I, Line 360
 
CORNS.............1
'Tis true I had no corns - no! thank the fates, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 17
 
CORONAL...........2
To make a coronal ; and round him grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 409
Weaving a coronal of tender scions Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 693
 
CORONALS..........1
The flowers of autumn for your coronals . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 814
 
CORONET...........2
Sleep, quiet with his poppy coronet : Sleep and Poetry, Line 348
To be conscious of such a coronet . On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 8
 
CORPSE............1
And so remain'd as he a corpse had been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 919
 
CORRIDOR..........1
The corridor , and scarce upright could reach The Jealousies, Line 625
 
CORRIDORS.........1
Of halls and corridors . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 72
 
CORRUPT...........1
Or in that place the moth could not corrupt , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 75
 
CORSE.............2
Over his waned corse , the tremulous shower Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 482
Appear'd, and, stepping to a beauteous corse , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 778
 
CORSLET...........1
Conrad's sword, his corslet , and his helm, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 69
 
CORTEZ............1
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 11
 
COSSET............1
For idleness to cosset , nurse, and dandle; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 2
 
COST..............2
Who cost her mother Tellus keener pangs, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 54
Whence all this mighty cost and blaze of wealth could spring. Lamia, Part II, Line 198
 
COSTLINESS........1
There must be some superior costliness , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 33
 
COSTLY............2
Springing from a costly vase. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 55
costly Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
COT...............1
Toward the castle or the cot where long ago was born There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 11
 
COTERIES..........1
To waiting-maids, and bed-room coteries , The Jealousies, Line 119
 
COTTAGE...........2
That in a little cottage I have found; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 10
To bend with apples the moss'd cottage -trees, To Autumn, Line 5
 
COTTAGERS.........1
And gave them to the cottagers Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 23
 
COTTAGES..........1
To scour the plains and search the cottages . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 39
 
COTTON............1
Its swathe is on the cotton tree; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 21
 
COTTUS............1
Next Cottus : prone he lay, chin uppermost, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 49
 
COUCH.............15
The pleasant day, upon a couch at ease. Sleep and Poetry, Line 353
For the sun's purple couch ; to emulate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 365
On her own couch , new made of flower leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 438
Feeling about for its old couch of space Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 336
For on a silken couch of rosy pride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 392
From the imprinted couch , and when he did, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 871
Ripe fruits, and lonely couch , contentment gave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 968
And my couch a low grass tomb. Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 33
And on her couch low murmuring "Where? O where?" Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 240
And couch supine their beauties, lily white; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 52
For rest divine upon exalted couch Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 192
Upon a couch , near to a curtaining Lamia, Part II, Line 18
As pale it lay upon the rosy couch : Lamia, Part II, Line 250
On the high couch he lay!- his friends came round- Lamia, Part II, Line 309
For rest divine upon exalted couch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 36
 
COUCH'D...........1
Couch'd in the teeming grass, Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 7
 
COUCH'S...........1
The dull of midnight, at her couch's foot Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 274
 
COUCHANT..........2
The frozen God still couchant on the earth, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 87
Bright, and cirque- couchant in a dusky brake. Lamia, Part I, Line 46
 
COUCHED...........2
Couched in thy brightness, dream of fields divine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 58
Saw two fair creatures, couched side by side Ode to Psyche, Line 9
 
COUCHES...........3
Couches of rugged stone, and slaty ridge Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 16
Couches warm as theirs is cold? Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 70
Around the silken couches , wondering Lamia, Part II, Line 197
 
COUGHING..........1
Stuck in his moral throat, no coughing e'er could stir. The Jealousies, Line 108
 
COULD'ST..........1
O thou could'st foster me beyond the brink Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 306
 
COULDST...........3
Couldst thou wish for lineage higher Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 37
Thou couldst rejoice to see my hopeless stream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1002
An inch appears the utmost thou couldst budge; The Jealousies, Line 245
 
COUNCIL...........6
How in the Council you condemn'd this war, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 147
Enter GONFRID, from the Council -room. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 17b
Instant dismiss'd the Council from his sight, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 20
[Exit. Enter the Nobles from the Council -room. They cross Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
In Council , dreams too much among his books. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 32
The Common Council and my fool Lord Mayor The Jealousies, Line 768
 
COUNCILS..........1
Hot to their Councils , scarce content O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 9
 
COUNSEL...........6
They all three wept - but counsel was as vain When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 65
O speak your counsel now, for Saturn's ear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 162
When, lackeying my counsel at a beck, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 99
You would not hear my counsel , when his life Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 17
Sometimes the counsel of a dying man Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 41
Faithful counsel have I given, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Glocester, Line 5b
 
COUNSELLORS.......1
Are all my counsellors . If they can make Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 108
 
COUNT.............11
Weep! I'll count the tears: Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 10
Of kind and passionate looks; to count , and count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 657
Of kind and passionate looks; to count, and count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 657
No more will I count over, link by link, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 978
Exhales in mists to heaven. Aye, the count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 723
Come down, we pray thee, ere the hot sun count Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 187
Do you not count , when I am queen, to take Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 115
Who goes there? Count Sigifred? Ha! ha! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 33
We'll meet upon our subject. Farewell, Count ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 63
To count with the toil the innumerable degrees. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 92
Or kiss thine eyes, or count thy locks, tress after tress?" The Jealousies, Line 171
 
COUNTENANCE.......9
Of thy lively countenance , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 3
When I think on thy noble countenance : Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 52
More serene than Cordelia's countenance ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 9
A smile was on his countenance ; he seem'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 175
Already, a more healthy countenance ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 987
His laugh at nature's holy countenance , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 948
Your honest countenance all things above, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 34
Is then a father's countenance a Gorgon? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 12
From his old teacher's wrinkled countenance , Lamia, Part II, Line 244
 
COUNTERCHANGE.....1
Their points of contact, and swift counterchange ; Lamia, Part I, Line 194
 
COUNTERFEIT.......1
Moans from my heart, and sighs not counterfeit . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 17
 
COUNTING..........1
Counting his woe-worn minutes, by the strokes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 50
 
COUNTLESS.........1
Speckled with countless fleeces? Have not rains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 216
 
COUNTREE..........1
Ravish'd away far from her dear countree ; The Jealousies, Line 77
 
COUNTRIES.........1
Then will I pass the countries that I see Sleep and Poetry, Line 99
 
COUNTRY...........5
The poor folk of the sea- country I blest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 368
From mouth to mouth through all the country pass'd: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 502
Tasting of Flora and the country green, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 13
The Country , with the Castle in the distance. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Setting
The Country . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Setting
 
COUNTRY'S.........2
Let me not see our country's honour fade: To Hope, Line 32
Proud to behold him in his country's eye. Addressed to Haydon, Line 14
 
COUNTS............1
" Counts of the palace, and the state purveyor The Jealousies, Line 766
 
COUPLE'S..........1
And dipt again, with the young couple's weight,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 426
 
COUPLED...........2
Coupled so unaware; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 39
Her ears, and she shall take them coupled with Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 16
 
COUPLET...........1
Till this oracular couplet met his eye The Jealousies, Line 454
 
COURIERS..........1
For couriers are abroad to seek you out. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 124
 
COURSE............10
written with the least atom of purpose to forestall criticisms of course , but Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
My soul to keep in its resolved course ." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 488
Along the ground they took a winding course . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 926
Stay, stay thy weary course , and let me lead, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 950
I will delight thee all my winding course , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 988
Away from me again, as though her course Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 649
We fall by course of Nature's law, not force Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 181
And ever ready was to take her course What can I do to drive away, Line 12
Anon, I'll tell what course were best to take; The Jealousies, Line 493
And, as we shaped our course , this, that way run, The Jealousies, Line 723
 
COURSERS..........2
Had found white coursers prancing in the glen: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 57
In air he sees white coursers paw, and prance, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 26
 
COURSES...........2
O'erwhelming water- courses ; scaring out Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 88
Spin round, the stars their antient courses keep, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 419
 
COURT.............15
With the base purple of a court oppress'd, To Hope, Line 39
Of clattering hoofs; into the court he sprang, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 76
And as he to the court -yard pass'd along, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 193
By following fat elbows up a court . Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 19
When they were come unto the Faery's court When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 1
Pedestal'd haply in a palace court , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 32
A poor court -bankrupt, outwitted and lost, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
The Court -yard of the Castle. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Setting
If men, in court and camp, lie not outright, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 35
Turn, thou court -Janus, thou forget'st thyself; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 248
An inner Court of the Castle. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Setting
That, on a court day bow'd to haughty Maud, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 29
Which seeing, his high court of parliament The Jealousies, Line 19
"'Stead of his anxious Majesty and court The Jealousies, Line 757
"A poet, mounted on the court -clown's back, The Jealousies, Line 775
 
COURTEOUS.........4
Ah! courteous Sir Knight, with large joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 17
In courteous fountains to all cups outreach'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 926
With reconciling words and courteous mien Lamia, Part II, Line 171
Of accent feminine, so courteous ." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 215
 
COURTEOUSLY.......2
Lorenzo, courteously as he was wont, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 189
And touch'd the wards; the door full courteously When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 71
 
COURTESY..........2
Do me the courtesy , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 43b
How Glocester overstrains his courtesy King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 37
 
COURTIER'S........1
And kiss the courtier's missal, its silk steps? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 65
 
COURTIERS.........3
[Enter GERSA and Courtiers . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 42
[Exeunt Courtiers . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 45
To your so loving courtiers for one day; The Jealousies, Line 536
 
COURTLIEST........2
The courtliest inviter to a feast; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 9
From lips the courtliest and the rubiest King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 55
 
COURTLY...........2
Or stand in courtly talk by fives and sevens: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 43
Came up,- a courtly smile upon his face, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 125
 
COURTS............5
With outspread wings the Naiad Zephyr courts , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 6
All courts and passages, where silence dead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 267
Into the outer courts of Neptune's state: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 854
Glar'd a blood-red through all its thousand courts , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 179
Glares a blood red through all the thousand courts , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 27
 
COUSIN............3
Blue!- gentle cousin to the forest green, Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 9
But Selfishness, Love's cousin , held not long Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 241
Thy flesh, near cousin to the common dust, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 109
 
COUSIN'S..........1
And for the Speaker's second cousin's aunt, The Jealousies, Line 152
 
COV'RING..........1
Cov'ring half thine ivory breast; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 46
 
COVE..............2
Into a shady, fresh, and ripply cove , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 430
When the prow sweeps into a midnight cove . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 355
 
COVENANTAL........1
And the Covenantal Ark, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 36
 
COVER'D...........3
Cover'd with crystal vines; then weeping trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 615
And cover'd it with mould, and o'er it set Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 415
Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 47
 
COVERLET..........1
While legion'd fairies pac'd the coverlet , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 168
 
COVERLETS.........1
My table coverlets of Jason's fleece Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 62
 
COVERLID..........1
Or when grey clouds are thy cold coverlid ? To Ailsa Rock, Line 8
 
COVERLIDS.........1
And coverlids gold-tinted like the peach, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 396
 
COVERT............10
Where on one side are covert branches hung, To George Felton Mathew, Line 45
From his lush clover covert ; - when anew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 3
That for themselves a cooling covert make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 17
Of covert flowers in vain; and then he flung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 95
He sprang from his green covert : there she lay, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 101
As the break- covert blood-hounds of such sin: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 221
Where Porphyro took covert , pleas'd amain. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 188
I know the covert , for thence came I hither." Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 152
But for the main, here found they covert drear. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 32
There was no covert , no retired cave Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 39
 
COVERTS...........1
And birds from coverts innermost and drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 470
 
COVERTURE.........1
Pull'd down fresh foliage and coverture Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 930
 
COVETOUS..........1
Into their vision covetous and sly! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 141
 
COWARD............5
A coward , did my very eye-lids wink Sleep and Poetry, Line 299
For endless pleasure, by some coward blushes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 788
Yet must I be a coward !- Horror rushes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 789
I am safe! Coward ! why am I in fear? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 102
O faltering coward ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 113b
 
COWARDICE.........1
In hungry pride and gainful cowardice , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 130
 
COWARDS...........2
Cowards , who never knew their little hearts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 79
Fly, cowards , fly! Glocester is at your backs! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 9
 
COWER.............3
Should cower beneath what, in comparison, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 154
Draw! but remember thou must cower thy plumes, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 109
And make him cower lowly while I soar? What can I do to drive away, Line 23
 
COWER'D...........1
Faded before him, cower'd , nor could restrain Lamia, Part I, Line 137
 
COWERING..........1
Cowering their tawny brushes. Silent sails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 647
 
COWL..............3
This skull-cap wore the cowl from sloth, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 19
Took to the cowl ,- then rav'd and swore O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 53
Shall sprawl distracted! O that that dull cowl Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
 
COWL'D............1
The lady weeping, the old abbot cowl'd . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 12
 
COWSLIP...........3
And where the bee with cowslip bells was wrestling. To George Felton Mathew, Line 50
'Tis a cowslip bed; Hither, hither, love, Line 6
A cowslip on the head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 168
 
COWSLIP'D.........1
From rushes green, and brakes, and cowslip'd lawns, Lamia, Part I, Line 6
 
COY...............5
To the coy muse, with me she would not live To George Felton Mathew, Line 32
Or the coy moon, when in the waviness To My Brother George (epistle), Line 59
To embracements warm as theirs makes coy excuse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 533
Fame, like a wayward girl, will still be coy On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 1
Her soft look growing coy , she saw his chain so sure: Lamia, Part I, Line 256
 
CRACK.............1
Whose rug is straw, whose wholeness is a crack ; The Jealousies, Line 230
 
CRACKLING.........1
Bay leaves were crackling in the fragrant pile, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 228
 
CRACKLINGS........1
And their faint cracklings o'er our silence creep To My Brothers, Line 2
 
CRADLE............8
From out her cradle shell. The wind out-blows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 627
And airy cradle , lowly bow'd his face Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 337
From thy sea-foamy cradle ; or to doff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 699
To cradle thee, my sweet, and lull thee: yes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 572
As was thy cradle ; hither shalt thou flee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 995
To find a bard's low cradle place about the silent north. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 28
Its cradle still are in the lake; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 19
This cradle of my glory, this soft clime, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 236
 
CRADLE'S..........1
Upon the little cradle's top 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 35
 
CRADLED...........1
And cradled me in roses. Thus condemn'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 457
 
CRADLING..........2
A yielding up, a cradling on her care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 411
Their cradling arms, and purpos'd to convey Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1017
 
CRAFTICANT........5
Close at your back, that sly old Crafticant ? The Jealousies, Line 49
Written by Crafticant , and published The Jealousies, Line 87
First wily Crafticant , the chamberlain, The Jealousies, Line 580
Old Crafticant will smoke me, by-the-bye! The Jealousies, Line 615
Thus Crafticant pursues his diary:- The Jealousies, Line 641
 
CRAFTICANTO.......1
This as a falsehood Crafticanto treats; The Jealousies, Line 631
 
CRAFTICANTO'S.....1
Down stairs on Crafticanto's evidence; The Jealousies, Line 789
 
CRAG..............9
Is mist and crag - not only on this height, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 13
Red- Crag , my spectacles! Now let me see! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 29
Red- Crag !- What, madam, can you then repent Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 44
Red- Crag , I say! O I must have you close! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 47
Red- Crag , there lies beneath my farthest toe Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 48
A vein of sulphur - go, dear Red- Crag , go- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 49
The moment then - for then will Red- Crag rub Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 65
Crag jutting forth to crag, and rocks that seem'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 10
Crag jutting forth to crag , and rocks that seem'd Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 10
 
CRAG'S............1
Above her, on a crag's uneasy shelve, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 64
 
CRAGGINESS........1
O'er sailing the blue cragginess , a car Sleep and Poetry, Line 126
 
CRAGGIS...........1
A coming down by craggis grey Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 3
 
CRAGGY............5
And craggy isles, and sea-mew's plaintive cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 341
Her brothers were the craggy hills, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 9
Hearken, thou craggy ocean pyramid, To Ailsa Rock, Line 1
Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet; Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 10
The craggy hollowness of a wild-reefed shore. The Jealousies, Line 738
 
CRAMP'D...........1
Gaunt, wither'd, sapless, feeble, cramp'd , and lame. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 638
 
CRAMPT............1
Lock'd up like veins of metal, crampt and screw'd; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 25
 
CRANIOLOGIST......1
Well! I'm a craniologist , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 17
 
CRANNIED..........1
Like crannied vermin,- no! but fresh, and young, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 84
 
CRANNIES..........1
Into the dwellings, through the door crannies , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 206
 
CRANNY............1
Into some cranny to escape my wrath? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
 
CRAVAT............1
Old Socrates a tying his cravat ; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 9
 
CRAVATS...........1
To cravats and to petticoats. Not Aladdin magian, Line 52
 
CRAVE.............1
Young Phoebe's, golden hair'd; and so 'gan crave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 451
 
CRAVED............1
And fluttering ensigns emulously craved The Jealousies, Line 734
 
CRAVINGS..........1
Annull'd my vigorous cravings : and thus quell'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 662
 
CRAWL.............2
May change you to a spider, so to crawl Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
Where the Chief Justice on his knees and hands doth crawl . The Jealousies, Line 765
 
CRAWL'D...........1
This crawl'd through life in feebleness, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 31
 
CRAZE.............3
And, for my tortur'd brain begins to craze , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 116
She would weep, and he would craze : Robin Hood, Line 42
The holy missal; thou didst craze O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 45
 
CRAZED............1
O they had all been sav'd but crazed eld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 661


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Published @ RC

March 2005