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Keats Concordance
 
D.................1
Better than Mr. D --, All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 30
 
D'YE..............2
Blockhead, d'ye hear - Blockhead, I'll make her feel. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 53
From this so famous field - D'ye hear! be quick! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 47
 
DABBLED...........1
Dew- dabbled on their stalks, the ouzel sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 683
 
DABBLES...........1
She dabbles , on the cool and sluicy sands: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 946
 
DABBLING..........1
A fold of lawny mantle dabbling swims Sleep and Poetry, Line 374
 
DACK'D............1
And chatter with dack'd hair'd critics, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 39
 
DAEDALE...........1
I have no daedale heart: why is it wrung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 459
 
DAFFED............1
Braw Tam was daffed like a chick, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 35
 
DAFFODIL..........1
Young playmates of the rose and daffodil , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 572
 
DAFFODILS.........2
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 15
While her robes flaunted with the daffodils . Lamia, Part I, Line 184
 
DAFT..............1
As though some knotty problem, that had daft Lamia, Part II, Line 160
 
DAGGER............3
With golden star, or dagger bright, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 94
[Draws a dagger . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 179b
Take away the dagger . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ethelbert, Line 189b
 
DAILY.............4
Kissing thy daily food from Naiad's pearly hands. To George Felton Mathew, Line 93
Daily , I pluck sweet flowerets from their bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 954
With daily boon of fish most delicate: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 369
Suffering a daily death from evil tongues; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 45
 
DAINTIES..........4
Those dainties made to still an infant's cries: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 374
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 1
"All cates and dainties shall be stored there The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 173
From Fez; and spiced dainties , every one, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 269
 
DAINTIEST.........1
Adieu, my daintiest Dream! although so vast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 656
 
DAINTY............10
In a dainty bend they lie, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 9
Were rippling round her dainty fairness now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 939
The more, the more I saw her dainty hue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 408
Ha! ha! Sir Dainty ! there must be a nurse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 570
For dainty toying. Cupid, empire-sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 931
Nay, look not down, nor lick thy dainty wrists- To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 9
Sweeter than those dainty pies Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 8
And press my dainty morsel to my breast. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 67
"She is my dainty changeling, near and dear, The Jealousies, Line 404
Princess turn'd dainty , to our great surprise, The Jealousies, Line 652
 
DAIRY.............2
Its delicate amber; and the dairy pails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 44
Ye tight little fairy, just fresh from the dairy , Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 3
 
DAISIES...........8
Before the daisies , vermeil rimm'd and white, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 50
Daisies upon the sacred sward last eve, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 93
Handfuls of daisies ." - "Endymion, how strange! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 632
The daisies blow, For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 32
O who would not rumple the daisies there, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 19
Where the daisies are rose-scented, Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 14
And daisies on the aguish hills. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 12
As daisies lurk'd in June-grass, buds in treen; The Jealousies, Line 347
 
DAISY.............3
Or is't thy dewy hand the daisy tips? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 151
The daisy and the marigold; Fancy, Line 48
They scatter'd,- daisy , primrose, hyacinth,- The Jealousies, Line 728
 
DAISY'S...........1
And we will sigh in the daisy's eye Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 15
 
DALE..............1
Over the hill and over the dale , Over the hill and over the dale, Line 1
 
DALES.............4
Thy dales , and hills, are fading from my view: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 104
More healthful than the leafiness of dales ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 7
I love your hills and I love your dales , Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 9
In Tempe or the dales of Arcady? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 7
 
DALLIANCE.........2
This sweetest day for dalliance was born; Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 15
Of soothing warmth, of dalliance supreme; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 439
 
DALLYING..........1
Left sudden by a dallying breath of air, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 117
 
DAMASK............2
By tenderest pressure, a faint damask mouth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 405
Blush'd a live damask , and swift-lisping said, Lamia, Part I, Line 116
 
DAMASK'D..........1
As are the tiger-moth's deep- damask'd wings; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 213
 
DAME..............9
The youth of Caria plac'd the lovely dame Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 345
And when he is restor'd, thou, fairest dame , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 816
How she doth whisper to that aged Dame , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 346
"It shall be as thou wishest," said the Dame : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 172
The dame return'd, and whisper'd in his ear The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 183
In Provence call'd, "La belle dame sans mercy": The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 292
They cried - "La belle dame sans merci La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 39
Has just return'd. He bids me say, bright dame , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 10
Live!- O! at Canterbury, with her old grand- dame ." The Jealousies, Line 387
 
DAMES.............1
As she had heard old dames full many times declare. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
 
DAMN'D............4
I've had a damn'd confounded ugly dream, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 26
At his damn'd blunder! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 54
Then the damn'd crime of blurting to the world Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 25
And damn'd his House of Commons, in complete chagrin. The Jealousies, Line 135
 
DAMNATION.........1
Betwixt damnation and impassion'd clay On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 6
 
DAMNED............1
Prevail against my fury. Damned priest! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 170
 
DAMNS.............1
It swallows chairmen, damns , and hackney coaches. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 15
 
DAMP..............4
Still, still they toll, and I should feel a damp , Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 9
Damp awe assail'd me; for there 'gan to boom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 484
On the damp grass myriads of lingering leaves, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 934
With damp and slippery footing from a depth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 85
 
DAMSEL............3
"Fair damsel , pity me! forgive that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 105
On me, and on this damsel fair of mine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 662
By many a damsel hoarse and rouge of cheek; Character of C.B., Line 23
 
DAMSEL'S..........2
He gave each damsel's hand so warm a kiss, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 147
Went, spiritual, through the damsel's hand; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 498
 
DAMSELS...........4
Light-footed damsels move with gentle paces Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 41
Leading the way, young damsels danced along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 135
"Whence came ye, merry Damsels ! whence came ye! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 218
Turn, damsels ! hist! one word I have to say. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 909
 
DANAE'S...........1
Danae's Son, before Jove newly bow'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 606
 
DANC'D............4
Time's sweet first-fruits - they danc'd to weariness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 321
And my boat danc'd in every creek and bay; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 319
The Nereids danc'd ; the Syrens faintly sang; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 889
She danc'd along with vague, regardless eyes, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 64
 
DANCE.............22
And thy humid eyes that dance Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 4
And always does my heart with pleasure dance , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 51
Thou spar'st the flowers in thy mazy dance ? To G.A.W., Line 8
And still will dance with ever varied ease, Sleep and Poetry, Line 115
But when my eyes with thine thereon could dance : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 150
Made a delighted way. Then dance , and song, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 933
Though he should dance from eve till peep of day- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 169
We dance before him thorough kingdoms wide:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 225
Onward these myriads - with song and dance , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 243
Join dance with shadowy Hours; while still the blast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 424
Do you get health - and Tom the same - I'll dance , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 110
At every farthing quadrille dance ." Not Aladdin magian, Line 55
Or dance , or play, do any thing, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 86
And dance , and ruffle their garments black. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 88
And dance and kiss and love as faeries do, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 3
The Ape for very fear began to dance , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 48
Dance , and Provencal song, and sunburnt mirth! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 14
You see now how I dance attendance here, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 7
Of dowdies, for some dance or party drest, The Jealousies, Line 242
To have such splendour dance attendance at her heels. The Jealousies, Line 594
At his sweet prose, and, if we can, make dance The Jealousies, Line 635
All things turn'd topsy-turvy in a devil's dance . The Jealousies, Line 756
 
DANCE'S...........1
Though swimming through the dance's dangerous wreath, To Fanny, Line 27
 
DANCED............2
Leading the way, young damsels danced along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 135
Cinque-parted danced , some half asleep reposed The Jealousies, Line 690
 
DANCES............3
E'en then my soul with exultation dances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 7
A full-brimm'd goblet, dances lightly, sings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 416
Who dances on bubbles where brooklets meet- Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 6
 
DANCETH...........1
Spirit here that danceth ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 13
 
DANCING...........12
For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye. Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 2
His breast is dancing on the restless sea. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 138
Dancing their sleek hair into tangled curls; Sleep and Poetry, Line 150
Young companies nimbly began dancing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 313
Moreover, through the dancing poppies stole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 566
Dancing before the morning gates of heaven? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 688
Dancing upon the waves, as if to please Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 84
With dancing and loud revelry,- and went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 535
All madly dancing through the pleasant valley, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 202
Trifling his ivy-dart, in dancing mood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 210
Dancing music, music sad, Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 18
Itself with dancing bulrush, and the bream Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 212
 
DANCINGLY.........1
As dancingly as thine. Be not afraid, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 307
 
DANDELION'S.......1
Fanning away the dandelion's down; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 96
 
DANDIES...........1
To or three dandies - Two or three posies, Line 19
 
DANDLE............1
For idleness to cosset, nurse, and dandle ; And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 2
 
DANGER............2
Kept danger all aloof from Otho's head, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 22
Till flurried danger held the mirror up, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 80
 
DANGER'D..........1
Let her glide on! This danger'd neck is saved, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 6
 
DANGEROUS.........5
But lapp'd and lull'd along the dangerous sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 646
With dangerous speed: and so he did not mourn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 550
Through dangerous winds, had by my footsteps worn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 616
I am near hustled to a dangerous gulph, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 115
Though swimming through the dance's dangerous wreath, To Fanny, Line 27
 
DANIEL............2
Young Daniel , who did straightway pluck the beam Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 6
That any Daniel , though he be a sot, Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 12
 
DANK..............1
In desolate places, where dank moisture breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 240
 
DANUBE'S..........1
The provinces about the Danube's mouth, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 19
 
DAPHNE'S..........1
By Daphne's fright, behold Apollo!-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 611a
 
DAPPLE............1
The freedom of three steeds of dapple brown: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 167
 
DAPPLED...........1
And startle the dappled prickets? For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 42
 
DAR'D.............2
Ah, desperate mortal! I ev'n dar'd to press Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 661
Amid a camp, whose steeled swarms I dar'd Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 67
 
DAR'ST............1
How dar'st thou lift those beetle brows at me? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 77
 
DARE..............16
From such fine pictures, heavens! I cannot dare Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 19
When - who, who did dare God of the golden bow, Line 31
My soul; that I may dare , in wayfaring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 133
To gladden thee; and all I dare to say, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 121
Is - is it to be so? No! Who will dare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 749
Why did poor Glaucus ever - ever dare Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 400
I dare not yet!- Oh never will the prize, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 74
For I am slow and feeble, and scarce dare The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 176
You are my enemy, I dare here swear Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
I dare not. 'Twould pollute so good a father! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 99
Prais'd be the heavens, I now dare own myself! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 94
And you dare own your name. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 97b
Of her high phrase: perhaps no further dare . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 468
Dare keep its wretched home: To Fanny, Line 45
Eludes death, giving death to most that dare King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 14
How dare , against a man disarm'd? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 20b
 
DARED.............2
At speaking out what I have dared to think. Sleep and Poetry, Line 300
Who, thus far, discontent, has dared to tread, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 36
 
DARES.............13
Lo! who dares say, "Do this"?- Who dares call down To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 9
Lo! who dares say, "Do this"?- Who dares call down To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 9
And rigid ranks of iron - whence who dares Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 732
I look where no one dares , Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 9
To make all bare before he dares to stray Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 254
Dares to pass our sacred ways, Not Aladdin magian, Line 36
Dares to touch audaciously Not Aladdin magian, Line 37
What whining bit of tongue and mouth thus dares Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 21
It dares what no one dares; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 43
It dares what no one dares ; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 43
But dares not look behind, or all the charm is fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 234
Who lets him forth again? or dares to give Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 171
Who dares take such large charter from our smiles! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 70
 
DAREST............1
Darest thou? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 20a
 
DARIEN............1
Silent, upon a peak in Darien . On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 14
 
DARING............3
With daring Milton through the fields of air: Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 11
Enraptured dwells, - not daring to respire, Ode to Apollo, Line 16
My daring steps: or if thy tender care, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 57
 
DARIUS............1
To play the Alexander with Darius . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 34
 
DARK..............79
So when in youth the eye's dark glance Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 13
Through the dark robe oft amber rays prevail, To Lord Byron, Line 11
So, when dark thoughts my boding spirit shroud, To Hope, Line 46
Hast thou a goblet for dark sparkling wine? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 5
Light feet, dark violet eyes, and parted hair; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
In this dark city, nor would condescend To George Felton Mathew, Line 33
Where the dark -leav'd laburnum's drooping clusters To George Felton Mathew, Line 41
There must be too a ruin dark , and gloomy, To George Felton Mathew, Line 51
Of thy dark hair that extends Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 13
And his dark brow for very wrath is knit? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 26
In dark green ivy, and among wild larches? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 34
Would he naught see but the dark , silent blue To My Brother George (epistle), Line 57
Out the dark mysteries of human souls Sleep and Poetry, Line 289
After dark vapours have oppressed our plains After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 1
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 13
Edg'd round with dark tree tops? through which a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 86
At last into a dark and vapoury tent- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 597
Far off, the shadows of his pinions dark , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 674
How tiptoe Night holds back her dark -grey hood. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 831
Like vestal primroses, but dark velvet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 874
How sickening, how dark the dreadful leisure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 910
To dive into the deepest. Dark , nor light, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 221
Of thy disparted nymphs? Through what dark tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 308
Those same dark curls blown vagrant in the wind; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 562
In sombre chariot; dark foldings thrown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 641
Over his nested young: but all is dark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 721
The Olympian eagle's vision, is dark , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 911
Dark as the parentage of chaos. Hark! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 912
Of that dark gulph he wept, and said: "I urge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1013
About his large dark locks, and faultering spake: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 291
I came to a dark valley.- Groanings swell'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 490
These phantoms with a nod. Lo! from the dark Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 533
Fainted away in that dark lair of night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 560
Dark clouds, and muttering of winds morose. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 652
And having done it, took his dark blue cloak Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 751
Of all his rebel tempests. Dark clouds faint Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 953
Written in star-light on the dark above: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1021
Through the dark earth, and through the wondrous sea? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 91
The light - the dusk - the dark - till break of day!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 136
Beneath dark palm trees by a river side? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 192
Each with large dark blue wings upon his back. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 344
These words awoke the stranger of dark tresses: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 462
Alone about the dark - Forgive me, sweet: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 480
To mark if her dark eyes had yet discern'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 505
Dark regions are around it, where the tombs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 516
Dark paradise! where pale becomes the bloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 538
And where dark yew trees, as we rustle through, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 673
Through the dark pillars of those sylvan aisles. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 968
At which that dark -eyed stranger stood elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 977
O may dark fancies err! they surely do; To the Nile, Line 9
Subside, if not to dark blue nativeness. Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 8
Into dark Soho For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 38
In the dark void of night. For in the world Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 71
A thousand men in troubles wide and dark : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 118
Out of the amorous dark what day doth borrow. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 206
But for a thing more deadly dark than all; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 266
Of pride and avarice,- the dark pine roof Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 294
And every night the dark glen yew Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 19
In a dark conspiracy Fancy, Line 23
'Tis dark : quick pattereth the flaw-blown sleet: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 325
'Tis dark : the iced gusts still rave and beat: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 327
Until the dusk eve left her dark The Eve of St. Mark, Line 51
Glow'd through, and wrought upon the muffling dark Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 275
And hazels thick, dark -stemm'd beneath the shade: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 27
Would come no mystery? For me, dark , dark, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 86
Would come no mystery? For me, dark, dark , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 86
Far, far around shall those dark -cluster'd trees Ode to Psyche, Line 54
By the dark roots, and leave her palpable, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 138
I found the stairs all dark , the lamps extinct, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 118
Through the dark ways they chose to the open air; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 125
Of these dull boughs,- this oven of dark thickets,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 20
Yes - this is dark - is it not dark? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 48a
Yes - this is dark - is it not dark ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 48a
Ran the dark veins, that none but feet divine Lamia, Part I, Line 385
In one whose brow had no dark veins to swell. Lamia, Part II, Line 77
The little struggler, sav'd from perils dark , Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 12
In the dark secret chambers of her skull The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 278
And stretch'd her white arm through the hollow dark , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 455
Quoth the dark page; "Oh no!" return'd the Swiss, The Jealousies, Line 281
 
DARKEN............3
Their ruffled locks where meeting hazels darken ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 237
Although, before the crystal heavens darken , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 739
Should darken her pure grot with muddy gloom; On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 8
 
DARKEN'D..........2
Of the late darken'd time,- the murderous spite Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 293
Darken'd the place; and neighing steeds were heard, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 184
 
DARKENED..........2
Of all the unhealthy and o'er- darkened ways Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 10
When all was darkened , with Etnean throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 585
 
DARKENING.........2
As from the darkening gloom a silver dove As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 1
Which we should see but for these darkening boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 863
 
DARKEST...........1
Over the darkest , lushest blue-bell bed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 631
 
DARKLING..........2
Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 355
Darkling I listen; and, for many a time Ode to a Nightingale, Line 51
 
DARKNESS..........30
Darkness , and worms, and shrouds, and sepulchres Sleep and Poetry, Line 243
The darkness ,- loneliness,- the fearful thunder; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 148
My soul with under darkness ; to entice Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 702
Old darkness from his throne: 'twas like the sun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 246
Committed to the darkness and the gloom: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 660
I roam in pleasant darkness , more unseen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 993
Dear unseen light in darkness ! eclipser Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 986
Of supreme darkness which thou feddest on O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 6
The atom darkness in a slow turmoil; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 322
Aye on the shores of darkness there is light, To Homer, Line 9
No light in the darkness , no torch in the gloom, Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 15
O darkness ! darkness! ever must I moan, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 7
O darkness! darkness ! ever must I moan, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 7
I cannot see - but darkness , death and darkness. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 242
I cannot see - but darkness, death and darkness . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 242
Sav'd from the shores of darkness , when the waves Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 135
From Chaos and parental Darkness came Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 191
Than Chaos and blank Darkness , though once chiefs; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 207
In glory that old Darkness : nor are we Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 215
Mantled before in darkness and huge shade, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 365
Its strength for darkness , burrowing like the mole; Sonnet to Sleep, Line 12
But, in embalmed darkness , guess each sweet Ode to a Nightingale, Line 43
With darkness , bring the stars to second me, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 27
Be speedy, darkness ! Till that comes, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 182b
Darkness steal out upon the sleepy world Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 30
Undazzled,- this is darkness ,- when I close Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 43
And darkness for no hope."- And she spake on, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 463
The woof of darkness , thick, for hid delight; The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 12
That all the power of darkness it repell'th, The Jealousies, Line 214
Of darkness , a great mountain (strange to speak), The Jealousies, Line 661
 
DARLING...........5
To clear futurity his darling fame! Sleep and Poetry, Line 359
Such darling essence, wherefore may I not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 740
And grief unto my darling joys dost bring. Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 14
"My darling Ape, I won't whip you to-day- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 63
Why will ye keep me from my darling child? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 10
 
DART..............8
Preparing on his spell-bound prey to dart : To Hope, Line 16
Where falling stars dart their artillery forth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 642
I saw a fury whetting a death- dart ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 558
Trifling his ivy- dart , in dancing mood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 210
And in these regions many a venom'd dart Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 520
Sang, of delicious love and honey'd dart ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 78
She'll dart forth, and cloudward soar. Fancy, Line 8
And, swiftly as a bright Phoebean dart , Lamia, Part I, Line 78
 
DARTED............3
Just when the sun his farewell beam has darted : To George Felton Mathew, Line 16
When some bright thought has darted through my brain: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 114
Headlong I darted ; at one eager swirl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 630
 
DARTINGS..........1
The freaks, and dartings of the black-wing'd swallow, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 14
 
DARTS.............4
Upsoars, and darts into the eastern light, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 2
There darts strange light of varied hues and dyes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 541
Of feather'd Indian darts about, as through Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 881
Lay full of darts ; for them alone did seethe Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 117
 
DASH..............1
Of a thousand fountains, so that he could dash Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 604
 
DASH'D............2
A copious spring; and both together dash'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 919
Dash'd by the wood-nymph's beauty, so he burn'd; Lamia, Part I, Line 130
 
DASHED............1
lips when she dashed it to the ground, for the mountain began to grumble; which Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
 
DASHING...........1
The dashing fount pour'd on, and where its pool Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 133
 
DASTARD...........3
Out, villain! dastard ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 158a
Could reach your dastard ears and fright you more! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 8
Ah dastard ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 39b
 
DASTARDLY.........1
Wilt thou creep dastardly behind his back, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 246
 
DATE..............1
It may read well, but sure 'tis out of date King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 33
 
DATED.............1
Is thy own safety; thou hast dated on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 144
 
DATES.............1
Manna and dates , in argosy transferr'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 268
 
DAUGHTER..........13
I rear'd my head, and look'd for Phoebus' daughter . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 414
Jove's daughter , and be reckon'd of his house. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 380
Has any here a daughter fair All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 37
Dulcet-eyed as Ceres' daughter , Fancy, Line 81
Keep it, my brightest daughter ; it may prove Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 19
Daughter , your hand; Ludolph's would fit it best. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 201
O, that my brother's daughter should so fall! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 149
Blessings upon you, daughter ! Sure you look Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
Daughter , do you so? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 141b
Dear daughter , you shall guide me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 149a
Now, Ludolph! Now, Auranthe, daughter fair! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 1
Of Lady Auranthe, our new-spoused daughter ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 214
The hand of his fair daughter Bellanaine; The Jealousies, Line 31
 
DAUGHTERS.........5
Happy is England, sweet her artless daughters ; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 9
That my soft verse will charm thy daughters fair, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 108
Babbling so wildly of its lovely daughters I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 42
One of shell-winding Triton's bright-hair'd daughters ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 691
Sons, daughters , and a home like honied hive. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 21
 
DAVID.............1
Scolds as King David pray'd, to chouse All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 47
 
DAWLISH...........2
And over the bourn to Dawlish - Over the hill and over the dale, Line 2
O who wouldn't hie to Dawlish fair, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 17
 
DAWN..............12
Now while the silent workings of the dawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 107
Come with the constant dawn upon thy morrows? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 46
Till a faint dawn surpris'd them. Glaucus cried, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 832
"Is no one near to help me? No fair dawn Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 44
For at the first, first dawn and thought of thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 734
And in the dawn she started up awake; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 328
Before the dawn in season due should blush, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 265
Therefore the operations of the dawn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 294
At tender eye- dawn of aurorean love: Ode to Psyche, Line 20
Forgets in the new dawn . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 234
By blazoning a lie, which in the dawn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 142
'Tis early dawn . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 51a
 
DAWN'D............1
Dawn'd in blue and full of love. Aye, he beheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 986
 
DAWNED............1
And so the dawned light in pomp receive. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 94
 
DAWNING...........4
Or flush'd Aurora in the roseate dawning ! To George Felton Mathew, Line 22
Her dawning love-look rapt Endymion blesses Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 463
Say they are gone,- with the new dawning light What can I do to drive away, Line 46
I see the dawning touch'd upon your face; The Jealousies, Line 481
 
DAWS..............1
The clamorous daws , that all the day The Eve of St. Mark, Line 61
 
DAY'S.............1
So a day's journey, in oblivious haze To J.R., Line 7
 
DAYS..............74
Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 1
Not like the formal crest of latter days : Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 3
Thus have I thought; and days on days have flown To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 49
Thus have I thought; and days on days have flown To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 49
But many days have past since last my heart To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 109
Ay, in those days the Muses were nigh cloy'd Sleep and Poetry, Line 178
How many days ! what desperate turmoil! Sleep and Poetry, Line 308
That in these days your praises should be sung I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 51
Be moved for days from whence it sometime fell, On the Sea, Line 7
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 9
That, any longer, I will pass my days Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 476
My pleasant days , because I could not mount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 746
Of weary days , made deeper exquisite, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 911
Chatted with thee, and many days exil'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 926
What a calm round of hours shall make my days . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 983
One kiss brings honey-dew from buried days . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 7
So once more days and nights aid me along, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 42
Alas! 'tis his old grief. For many days , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 47
Favour this gentle youth; his days are wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 549
Not of these days , but long ago 'twas told Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 830
O Tartarus! but some few days agone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 269
Keeping in wait whole days for Neptune's voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 355
Whole days and days in sheer astonishment; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 385
Whole days and days in sheer astonishment; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 385
I fled three days - when lo! before me stood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 566
And there, ere many days be overpast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 594
Which undone, these our latter days had risen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 19
Do smile upon the evening of my days : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 115
I love thee! and my days can never last. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 138
And languish'd there three days . Ye milder powers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 747
Through the old garden-ground of boyish days . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 784
My future days to her fane consecrate." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 888
How many mice and rats hast in thy days To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 2
No! those days are gone away, Robin Hood, Line 1
Once again her forest days , Robin Hood, Line 41
Though their days have hurried by Robin Hood, Line 61
Be with me in the summer days , and I Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 13
Honeyless days and days did he let pass; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 32
Honeyless days and days did he let pass; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 32
In the mid days of autumn, on their eves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 249
Portion'd us - happy days , or else to die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 332
This mortal body of a thousand days This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 1
One who was great through mortal days and died of fame unshorn. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 12
Many a mortal of these days Not Aladdin magian, Line 35
While others pass'd their idle days O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 47
Yet men will murder upon holy days : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 119
As if the vanward clouds of evil days Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 39
Not in the legends of the first of days , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 132
The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 335
Those days , all innocent of scathing war, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 336
Yet even in these days so far retir'd Ode to Psyche, Line 40
Upon his mortal days with temperate blood, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 2
In ancient days by emperor and clown: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 64
My idle days ? Ripe was the drowsy hour; Ode on Indolence, Line 15
A few days since, I was an open rebel,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 37
Hover around that life, whose bitter days Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 33
'Twas done in memory of my boyish days , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 40
Those days paternal from my memory, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 45
She should be paler for my troublous days - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 114
Happiest of days ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 128b
Too cheerful for these foul pernicious days . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
Then to the tender ear of her June days , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
About these thornless wilds; her pleasant days Lamia, Part I, Line 95
Sweet days a lovely graduate, still unshent, Lamia, Part I, Line 198
For the first time through many anguish'd days , Lamia, Part I, Line 303
Days happy as the gold coin could invent Lamia, Part I, Line 313
But wept alone those days , for why should she adore? Lamia, Part I, Line 321
Until they think warm days will never cease, To Autumn, Line 10
Where they may thoughtless sleep away their days , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 151
Every sole man hath days of joy and pain, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 172
Only the dreamer venoms all his days , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 175
As if the vanward clouds of evil days The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 341
So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 4
Buds gather'd from the green spring's middle- days , The Jealousies, Line 727
 
DAYS'.............1
A three days' journey in a moment done: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 253
 
DAYTIME...........1
Rather than shadow our own soul's daytime Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 70
 
DAZE..............1
Open eyes that never daze : Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 12
 
DAZED.............4
My sight right upward: but it was quite dazed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 601
Is in Apollo's hand: our dazed eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 726
She turn'd her dazed head full oft, Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 29
And dazed with saintly imageries. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 56
 
DAZZLE............1
To dazzle the soft moon, when tenderest clouds Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 228
 
DAZZLED...........7
Are things on which the dazzled senses rest Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 17
So passionately bright, my dazzled soul Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 594
Dazzled to trace it in the sunny skies. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 68
And made those dazzled thousands veil their eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 858
Touching with dazzled lips her starlight hand. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 419
Dazzled his madness! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 66
Are dazzled with the sweet proportioning, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 68
 
DAZZLING..........10
The dazzling sun-rise: two sisters sweet Sleep and Poetry, Line 367
Alive, and dazzling cool, and with a sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 609
Many all day in dazzling river stood, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 111
While still the dazzling globe maintain'd eclipse, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 288
Dazzling bowers of soft retire, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 6
Her dazzling torches; nor the music breathe Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 47
She was a gordian shape of dazzling hue, Lamia, Part I, Line 47
Wheels round its dazzling spokes."- The lady's cheek Lamia, Part II, Line 64
Fit appellation for this dazzling frame? Lamia, Part II, Line 89
My soul upon that dazzling breast! What can I do to drive away, Line 49
 
DAZZLINGLY........1
How tremulous- dazzlingly the wheels sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 189
 
DE................12
Was built by Cuthbert de Saint Aldebrim; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 44
"Philostratus, in his fourth book de Vita Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
EARL BALDWIN DE REDVERS King Stephen 4
DE KAIMS King Stephen 5
De Redvers! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 19b
Enter DE KAIMS and Knights, etc. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 14
Do it, De Kaims, I will not budge an inch. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 18
Come not near me, De Kaims, for by the price King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 22
Stephen - me - prisoner. Certes, De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 32
The Earl of Glocester. Stab to the hilts, De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 45
Of the least drop of creme de citron crystal clear." The Jealousies, Line 369
That since belong'd to Admiral De Witt, The Jealousies, Line 416
 
DEAD..............63
When thou art dead , and all thy wretched crew? Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 14
Or of the dead leaves rustling drearily, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 6
Why were ye not awake? But ye were dead Sleep and Poetry, Line 193
The poetry of earth is never dead : On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 1
Dead heavy - arms and shoulders gleam awhile: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 13
It is like a statue's, dead ,- You say you love; but with a voice, Line 18
We have imagined for the mighty dead ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 21
Thermopylae its heroes - not yet dead , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 318
Were dead and gone, and her caressing tongue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 340
Aye, even as dead -still as a marble man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 405
All courts and passages, where silence dead Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 267
Kissing dead things to life. The sleeping kine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 57
More dead than Morpheus' imaginings: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 122
Left me dead -drifting to that fatal power. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 417
An urn of tears, as though thou wert cold dead ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 432
Upon a dead thing's face my hand I laid; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 618
The sea-swell took her hair. Dead as she was Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 625
Those files of dead , scatter the same around, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 770
Showering those powerful fragments on the dead . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 784
Thought he, "Why am I not as are the dead , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 89
And look, quite dead to every worldly thing! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 292
For the first time, since he came nigh dead born Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 371
Their ample feathers, are in slumber dead ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 402
His eyes from the dead leaves, or one small pulse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 781
Souls of poets dead and gone, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 1
Souls of poets dead and gone, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 23
And dead as a venus tipsy. Over the hill and over the dale, Line 16
She saw it waxing very pale and dead , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 53
Too much of pity after they are dead , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 92
If Love impersonate was ever dead , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 398
'Twas love; cold,- dead indeed, but not dethroned. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 400
Among the dead : She withers, like a palm Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 447
From her dead eyes; and many a curious elf, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 453
Piteous she look'd on dead and senseless things, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 489
The real of beauty, free from that dead hue On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 10
Thou answer'st not, for thou art dead asleep; To Ailsa Rock, Line 9
Thy life is but two dead eternities, To Ailsa Rock, Line 10
Fancy is dead and drunken at its goal; This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 8
The lady fainted and he thought her dead , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 69
"And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by." Shakspeare O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 2
We are dead if that latchet gives one little chink. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 18
The sculptur'd dead , on each side, seem to freeze, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 14
Or may I never leave my grave among the dead ." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 180
But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 10
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 18
Dead ; and because the creature could not spit Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 47
Jealous of dead leaves in the bay wreath crown; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 12
Bloody Taraxa, is among the dead . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 136
Say it at once, sir! dead - dead - is she dead? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74
Say it at once, sir! dead - dead - is she dead? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74
Say it at once, sir! dead - dead - is she dead ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74
Mine is a cruel task: she is not dead , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 75
I thought her dead , and on the lowest step Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 120
In all the unknown chambers of the dead , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 18
A whisper in this silence that he's dead ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 45
She's dead ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 189a
Seeing all their luckless race are dead , save me, Lamia, Part II, Line 96
And all the dead whose names are in our lips, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 45
But where the dead leaf fell there did it rest: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 314
His old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 323
Who raked up ev'ry fact against the dead ,) The Jealousies, Line 89
Whose springs of life are all dried up and dead , The Jealousies, Line 228
With liquor and the staircase: verdict - found stone dead . The Jealousies, Line 630
 
DEADEN............1
But with thy beauty will I deaden it. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 631
 
DEADEN'D..........1
A stream went voiceless by, still deaden'd more The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 315
 
DEADENED..........1
A stream went voiceless by, still deadened more Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 11
 
DEADENING.........1
Into the deadening ether that still charms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 209
 
DEADLINESS........1
And very, very deadliness did nip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 342
 
DEADLY............14
That I have sigh'd for: with so deadly gasp Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 525
Away at once the deadly yellow spleen. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 917
The deadly feel of solitude: for lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 284
My own dear will, 'twould be a deadly bane. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 960
Near to a cypress grove, whose deadly maw, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 906
But for a thing more deadly dark than all; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 266
Spirit sole in deadly places; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 10
A deadly breath went forth to taint and blast Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 154
To deadly churning! Gersa, you are young, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 79
A gnawing - silent - deadly , quiet death! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 23
A deadly silence step by step increased, Lamia, Part II, Line 266
Lamia, no longer fair, there sat a deadly white. Lamia, Part II, Line 276
Slow, heavy, deadly was my pace: the cold The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 129
(Now all was silent) gave a deadly lie The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 449
 
DEAF..............4
Deaf to the nightingale's first under-song; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 61
Deaf to light Zephyrus it would not move; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 175
Ye deaf and senseless minutes of the day, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 76
Deaf to his throbbing throat's long, long melodious moan. Lamia, Part I, Line 75
 
DEAFENING.........1
Deafening the swallow's twitter, came a thrill Lamia, Part II, Line 27
 
DEAL..............1
To deal heaven's lightning. O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 72
 
DEALER............1
Yet so they did - and every dealer fair Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 143
 
DEALERS...........1
But retail dealers , diligent, let loose The Jealousies, Line 210
 
DEAR..............56
Dear child of sorrow! son of misery! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 2
Whene'er the fate of those I hold most dear To Hope, Line 19
Friends very dear to him he soon will see; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 58
E'en now, dear George, while this for you I write, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 9
It has been said, dear George, and true I hold it, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 23
Lays have I left of such a dear delight To My Brother George (epistle), Line 81
Shall the dear babe, upon its mother's breast, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 102
And warm thy sons!" Ah, my dear friend and brother, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 109
'Twas but to kiss my hand, dear George, to you! To My Brother George (epistle), Line 142
O Maker of sweet poets, dear delight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 116
Of their dear friends, nigh foolish with delight; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 228
That follow'd thine, and thy dear shepherd's kisses: I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 240
Melting a burden dear , Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 11
Hither, hither, dear , Hither, hither, love, Line 9
Hither, hither, dear , Hither, hither, love, Line 11
Think how dear , how dear. Hither, hither, love, Line 20
Think how dear, how dear . Hither, hither, love, Line 20
Dear as the temple's self, so does the moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 28
So dear a picture of his sovereign power, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 548
Dear goddess, help! or the wide-gaping air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 194
Revive, dear youth, or I shall faint and die; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 766
My own dear will, 'twould be a deadly bane. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 960
Sometimes these very pangs. Dear maiden, steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 985
Dear unseen light in darkness! eclipser Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 986
From my dear native land! Ah, foolish maid! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 31
I was to top the heavens. Dear maid, sith Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 110
" Dear lady," said Endymion, "'tis past: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 137
'Fore which I'll bend, bending, dear love, to thee: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 712
Me, dear Endymion, were I to weave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 749
" Dear brother mine! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 804b
To lure - Endymion, dear brother, say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 845
With thee as a dear sister. Thou alone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 866
Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 1
Dear Reynolds, I have a mysterious tale Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 86
A vein of sulphur - go, dear Red-Crag, go- Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 49
Dear madam, I must kiss you, faith I must! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 51
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 1
Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear , Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 7
Flit like a ghost away." - "Ah, Gossip dear , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 105
Those looks immortal, those complainings dear ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 313
"O brightest of my children dear , earth-born Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 309
O Heaven wide! O unseen parent dear ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 159
By sweet enforcement and remembrance dear , Ode to Psyche, Line 2
Now I am Otho's favorite, his dear friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 43
Are huddling undistinguish'd, my dear friends Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 128
My friend had held poor Ludolph's honour dear . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 63
Dear daughter, you shall guide me. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 149a
Dear son, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Otho, Line 151b
By great Apollo, thy dear foster child, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 286
" Dear Princess, do not whisper me so loud," The Jealousies, Line 46
Dear mistress, let him have no handle against you! The Jealousies, Line 54
Ravish'd away far from her dear countree; The Jealousies, Line 77
With the third part - (yet that is drinking dear !)- The Jealousies, Line 368
"She is my dainty changeling, near and dear , The Jealousies, Line 404
For your convenience, and her dear nerves' sake; The Jealousies, Line 491
Dear valuable creatures, how ye shine! The Jealousies, Line 617
 
DEARER............1
Happier, and dearer to society. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 112
 
DEAREST...........13
O come, dearest Emma! the rose is full blown, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 1
Still so pale? - then, dearest , weep; Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 9
His friends, the dearest . Hushing signs she made, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 409
Dearest of sisters, what my life shall be; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 982
Endymion! dearest ! Ah, unhappy me! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 762
Myself to thee. Ah, dearest , do not groan Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 779
My sovereign vision.- Dearest love, forgive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 183
Dearest Endymion! my entire love! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1022
This may sound strangely: but when, dearest girl, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 868
I must embrace you with my dearest gust! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 52
This ring as pledge of dearest amity; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 136
Ah! dearest love, sweet home of all my fears To Fanny, Line 9
"I pledge you, Hum! and pledge my dearest love, The Jealousies, Line 370
 
DEARLY............6
Away, away, or I shall dearly rue Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 957
She loves me dearly ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 177
Impossible - how dearly they embrace! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 802
How she might find the clay, so dearly prized, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 339
Love meanwhile held her dearly with his wings, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 5
Her work-box, and 'twill help your purpose dearly ; The Jealousies, Line 525
 
DEARTH............4
And mourn the fearful dearth of human kindness To George Felton Mathew, Line 62
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 8
Are swallow'd all, and made a seared dearth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 368
Let us entwine hoveringly - O dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 817
 
DEATH.............105
How soon the film of death obscur'd that eye, Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 3
Sign of the enchanter's death ; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 62
While his proud eye looks through the film of death ? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 70
Of flowering bays, that I may die a death Sleep and Poetry, Line 58
A woodland rivulet - a poet's death . After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 14
Or was I a worm too low-creeping for death , God of the golden bow, Line 11
'Tis young Leander toiling to his death . On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 9
Through copse-clad vallies,- ere their death , o'ertaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 120
Eternal whispers, glooms, the birth, life, death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 234
On either side; pitying the sad death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 327
And that, alas! is death . No, I can trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 514
My eyes at once to death : but 'twas to live, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 655
Of death , for the fair form had gone again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 905
Sorrow the way to death ; but patiently Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 973
Than the death -day of empires. Fearfully Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 34
How quiet death is. Where soil is men grow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 159
Muffling to death the pathos with his wings; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 421
Medicined death to a lengthened drowsiness: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 484
Death had come sudden; for no jot he mov'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 566
About her majesty, and front death -pale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 642
'Tis almost death to hear: O let me pour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 982
And pour to death along some hungry sands."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1004
Thou leddest Orpheus through the gleams of death ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 98
Mutter'd: "What lonely death am I to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 258
Had been my dreary death ? Fool! I began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 374
I plung'd for life or death . To interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 380
I saw a fury whetting a death -dart; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 558
All ruddy,- for here death no blossom nips. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 740
Death felt it to his inwards: 'twas too much: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 787
Death fell a weeping in his charnel-house. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 788
Death to a human eye: for there did spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 875
All death -shadows, and glooms that overcast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 981
The heavens and earth in one to such a death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 81
The death -watch tick is stifled. Enter none Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 531
Many upon thy death have ditties made; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 836
My kingdom's at its death , and just it is Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 940
For them his ears gush'd blood; for them in death Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 115
Of death among the bushes and the leaves, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 253
Pitying each form that hungry death hath marr'd, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 357
With death , as life. The ancient harps have said, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 396
Will die a death too lone and incomplete, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 487
Charmed to death by the drone of the humming may fly. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 12
And death to this fair haunt of spring, Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 3
Seem'd taking flight for heaven, without a death , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 8
But death intenser - death is life's high meed. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 14
But death intenser - death is life's high meed. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 14
And so live ever - or else swoon to death . Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 14
I cannot see - but darkness, death and darkness. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 242
A living death was in each gush of sounds, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 281
Most like the struggle at the gate of death ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 126
Of pale immortal death , and with a pang Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 128
Pale warriors, death pale were they all; La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 38
Colder than the mortal death . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 66
I have been half in love with easeful Death , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 52
Thou wast not born for death , immortal Bird! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 61
Nor let the beetle, nor the death -moth be Ode on Melancholy, Line 6
Death doing in a turban'd masquerade. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 5
Which he who breathes feels warning of his death , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 23
Death !- and slow tortures to the hardy fool Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 69
Off! And none pass this way on pain of death ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 72
Smote 'twixt the horns by the death -stunning mace Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 131
Suffering a daily death from evil tongues; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 45
trifle to me; his death you shall find none to yourself." Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 58
What swift death wilt thou die? As to the lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 171
Is to be ashes!- wither'd up to death ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 194
Whether they merit death , or should be plac'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 243
And be no more remember'd after death , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 267
Myself, as fits one wailing her own death ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 94
Or tears, or ravings, or self-threatened death , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 129
I would not see thee dragg'd to death by the hair, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
Moved 'twas with careful steps, and hush'd as death : Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 4
When I had heard e'en of thy death perhaps, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 21
Who never shook before. There's moody death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 4
A bitter death ,- a suffocating death,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
A bitter death,- a suffocating death ,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
A gnawing - silent - deadly, quiet death ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 23
A muffled death , ensnared in horrid silence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26
His most uneasy moments, when cold death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 14
After the page's story of the death Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 4
One while these proud towers are hush'd as death . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 14
The bird-lim'd raven? She shall croak to death ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 107
Lycius from death awoke into amaze, Lamia, Part I, Line 322
Gruff with contempt; which a death -nighing moan Lamia, Part II, Line 292
Then Lamia breath'd death breath; the sophist's eye, Lamia, Part II, Line 299
One minute before death , my iced foot touch'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 132
"What am I that should so be sav'd from death ? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 138
What am I that another death come not The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 139
"Who love their fellows even to the death ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 156
Though I breathe death with them it will be life The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 209
It works a constant change, which happy death The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 259
To no death was that visage; it had pass'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 261
Intense, that death would take me from the vale The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 397
There is no death in all the universe, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 423
No smell of death - there shall be death - Moan, moan, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 424
No smell of death - there shall be death - Moan, moan, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 424
Scampering to death at last! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 12a
Will Stephen's death be mark'd there, my good lord, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Knight, Line 6
Eludes death , giving death to most that dare King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 14
Eludes death, giving death to most that dare King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 14
Is't madness or a hunger after death King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 14
Death as a sovereign right unto a king King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 42
And order'd some death -warrants to be sent The Jealousies, Line 178
Tremble and quake to death ,- he feared less The Jealousies, Line 340
Grew pale as death , and fainted - very nigh! The Jealousies, Line 457
And many on their marrow-bones for death prepared. The Jealousies, Line 684
 
DEATH'S...........2
My head, and kiss death's foot. Love! love, farewel! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 275
As hot as death's is chill, with fierce convulse Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 129
 
DEATHBELL.........1
But no - already had his deathbell rung; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 22
 
DEATHFUL..........2
Thy deathful bow against some deer-herd bent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 511
Tripp'd lightly on, in sort of deathful glee; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 945
 
DEATHWARDS........1
Can put no end to; deathwards progressing The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 260
 
DEBATE............1
Whence genius wildly flash'd, and high debate ! Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 4
 
DEBONAIR..........1
Of wavy grass, and reads a debonair To one who has been long in city pent, Line 7
 
DEBONNAIRLY.......2
So she sat on the grass debonnairly . Over the hill and over the dale, Line 8
She lay on the grass debonnairly . Over the hill and over the dale, Line 12
 
DEBT..............3
And can I e'er repay the friendly debt ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 77
Catch an immortal thought to pay the debt On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 4
Since Merlin paid his Demon all the monstrous debt . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 171
 
DEBTOR............1
A father his son's debtor , or to heal Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 38


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Published @ RC

March 2005