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Keats Concordance
 
DECAN.............1
Rest for a space 'twixt Cairo and Decan ? To the Nile, Line 8
 
DECAY.............4
Young feather'd tyrant! by a swift decay Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 730
By gradual decay from beauty fell, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 256
To tell his forehead's swoon and faint when first began decay , There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 26
Wish'd, trusted, hoped 'twas no sign of decay - The Jealousies, Line 714
 
DECEITFUL.........1
In thy deceitful stream, a panting glow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 970
 
DECEIV'D..........2
I thought I did. Alas! I am deceiv'd . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 135
No, you are not deceiv'd . You took me for Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 136
 
DECEIVE...........4
And there into delight my soul deceive . Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 8
I would deceive her Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 179
And deceive thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 283
This very night: good angels her deceive ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 125
 
DECEIVED..........4
Though thou forsakest a deceived thing;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 332
Poor self- deceived wretches, who must think Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 76
All men may err. In truth I was deceived Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 45
O, poor deceived Prince, I pity thee! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 89
 
DECEIVES..........1
No, no, too eagerly my soul deceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 701
 
DECEIVING.........1
As she is fam'd to do, deceiving elf. Ode to a Nightingale, Line 74
 
DECEMBER..........3
In drear nighted December , In drear nighted December, Line 1
In drear nighted December , In drear nighted December, Line 9
Can make his June December - here he comes. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 58
 
DECEPTIONS........1
That those deceptions which for pleasure go Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 851
 
DECK..............1
In perilous bustle; while upon the deck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 657
 
DECLARE...........4
Why breathless, unable your bliss to declare ? To Some Ladies, Line 10
As she had heard old dames full many times declare . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 45
Burst the door open, quick - or I declare When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 16
(Who wish to give the devil her due) declare The Jealousies, Line 745
 
DECREASE..........1
Made, by a spell, the triple league decrease Lamia, Part I, Line 345
 
DECREE............1
I bow full hearted to your old decree ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 252
 
DECREED...........2
That my own soul has to itself decreed . Sleep and Poetry, Line 98
Whereon, it was decreed he should be rear'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 477
 
DECREES...........1
Withheld me first; and then decrees of fate; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 990
 
DECREPID..........1
Holding a poor, decrepid standard out Sleep and Poetry, Line 204
 
DECREPIT..........1
Seem'd but the faulture of decrepit things The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 70
 
DEDALIAN..........1
Melt my Dedalian wings, and drive me down Sleep and Poetry, Line 303
 
DEE...............1
Not the Wizard of the Dee Not Aladdin magian, Line 3
 
DEED..............13
Servant of heroic deed ! Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 58
Myself in poesy; so I may do the deed Sleep and Poetry, Line 97
attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
My goblet full of wine - my topmost deed :- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 168
No treason 'gainst his head in deed or word! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 63
In no deed did you give me more offence Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 144
To do an honest deed . Shall I confide-? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 37
It is so mad a deed , I must reflect Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 240
You, who could do this deed , would ne'er relent, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 256
The earth would shudder at so foul a deed ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
A deed to be applauded, 'scribed in gold! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 149
Tight-footed for the deed ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 167a
Now, when the wine has done its rosy deed , Lamia, Part II, Line 209
 
DEEDS.............13
Heroic deeds , and sung of fate, Ode to Apollo, Line 4
Had lifted Calidore for deeds of glory. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 108
To hear of knightly deeds , and gallant spurning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 143
Paw up against the light, and do strange deeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 166
Swart planet in the universe of deeds ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 15
But this is human life: the war, the deeds , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 153
Of the old bards to mighty deeds : his plans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 895
Names, deeds , gray legends, dire events, rebellions, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 114
I wonder not this stranger's victor- deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 52
Long toil'd in foreign wars, and whose high deeds Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 26
My crooked deeds show good and plausible, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 109
If not in title yet in noble deeds , King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 44
Of all the realm, admiring of his deeds . King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 56
 
DEEM..............4
From out his eye, and said - "I do not deem Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 7
O be propitious, nor severely deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 183
Ensky'd ere this, but truly that I deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 772
From wicked men like thee. Go, go!- I deem The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 143
 
DEEP..............82
But I want as deep a draught Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 7
That deep -brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 6
Upon the lore so voluble and deep , To My Brothers, Line 7
And soothed them into slumbers full and deep . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 224
Hide in deep herbage; and ere yet the bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 51
And it had gloomy shades, sequestered deep , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 67
And now, as deep into the wood as we Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 122
Before the deep intoxication. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 502
Lies a deep hollow, from whose ragged brows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 864
And elbow- deep with feverous fingering Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 54
A virgin light to the deep ; my grotto-sands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 113
How beautiful thou art! The world how deep ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 188
And, but from the deep cavern there was borne Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 199
Their marble being: now, as deep profound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 210
Into the fearful deep , to hide his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 217
Curves hugely: now, far in the deep abyss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 232
With deep -drawn sighs was quieting, he went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 255
Deliver me from this rapacious deep !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 332
Thus the tradition of the gusty deep . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 853
Until into earth's deep maw he rush'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 899
In gulf or aerie, mountains or deep dells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 94
A moon-beam to the deep , deep water-world, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 101
A moon-beam to the deep, deep water-world, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 101
With all my ardours: thou wast the deep glen; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 163
Furrow'd deep wrinkles in his forehead large, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 223
On forked lightning, to the deepest deep , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 248
From off a crystal pool, to see its deep , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 331
Of emerald deep : yet not exalt alone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 863
Of deep -seen wonders motionless,- and blaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 885
Its deep foundations, hissing into foam. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 948
Rapt in a deep prophetic solitude. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 9
Sleep may be had in that deep den of all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 525
And by another, in deep dell below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 679
And pebbles blue from deep enchanted wells. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 696
Begetters of our deep eternal theme! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 10
Jesting, deep in forest drear. Robin Hood, Line 18
A forester deep in thy midmost trees, Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 2
From the deep throat of sad Melpomene! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 442
To visit dolphin-coral in deep seas. To Homer, Line 4
The last in air, the former in the deep - To Ailsa Rock, Line 11
"I shed no tears;/ Deep thought, or awful vision, I had none;/ By O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Epigraph 1
So woful, and of such deep sorrowing, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 160
As are the tiger-moth's deep -damask'd wings; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 213
The blisses of her dream so pure and deep : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 301
Seen mid the sapphire heaven's deep repose; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 319
Deep in the shady sadness of a vale Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 1
In solemn tenour and deep organ tone: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 48
He stood, and heard not Thea's sobbing deep ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 139
While far within each aisle and deep recess, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 196
And from the basements deep to the high towers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 223
Sweet-shaped lightnings from the nadir deep Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 276
And plung'd all noiseless into the deep night. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 357
Wherefrom I take strange lore, and read it deep , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 148
Ponderest high and deep ; and in thy face Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 164
Full ankle- deep in lilies of the vale. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 35
On the deep intenser roof, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 17
Cool'd a long age in the deep -delved earth, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 12
Up the hill-side; and now 'tis buried deep Ode to a Nightingale, Line 77
And feed deep , deep upon her peerless eyes. Ode on Melancholy, Line 20
And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes. Ode on Melancholy, Line 20
With vases, to one deep in Phidian lore. Ode on Indolence, Line 10
Was it a silent deep -disguised plot Ode on Indolence, Line 13
Bring forth once more my bullion, treasured deep , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11
I am wound up in deep astonishment! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 117
His deep heart-sickness for a rebel child. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 39
It seem'd you were in deep discourse together; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 84
How deep she has bewitch'd him! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, First Lady, Line 14b
Or the deep key of Jove's sonorous mouth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 25
And panting fountains quivering with deep glows! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 47
Deep blue eyes, semi-shaded in white lids, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 61
In a deep goblet: let me see - what wine? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 120
A deep volcanian yellow took the place Lamia, Part I, Line 155
Of love deep learned to the red heart's core: Lamia, Part I, Line 190
Of deep sleep in a moment was betray'd. Lamia, Part II, Line 105
The deep -recessed vision:- all was blight; Lamia, Part II, Line 275
Deep in the shady sadness of a vale, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 294
In solemn tenor and deep organ tune; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 350
While, far within each aisle and deep recess, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 40
Will swamp them girth deep . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Second Knight, Line 15a
Where the close eye in deep rich fur might trace The Jealousies, Line 345
Shaded his deep green eyes, and wrinkles brown The Jealousies, Line 507
Talk'd of one Master Hubert, deep in her esteem. The Jealousies, Line 711
 
DEEPEN............1
With streams that deepen freshly into bowers. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 48
 
DEEPENING.........1
Deepening to richness from a snowy gleam; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 447
 
DEEPER............9
Beauties of deeper glance, and hear their singing, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 13
Of weary days, made deeper exquisite, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 911
Each gazer drank; and deeper drank more near: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 844
Deeper and deeper sinking, until drown'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 963
Deeper and deeper sinking, until drown'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 963
With every eve deeper and tenderer still; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 10
There is a deeper joy than all, more solemn in the heart, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 7
With deeper crimson, and a double smart? Lamia, Part II, Line 51
Spread deeper crimson than the battle's toil, King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 2
 
DEEPEST...........10
Of heaven and earth had faded: deepest shades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 692
Were deepest dungeons; heaths and sunny glades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 693
To dive into the deepest . Dark, nor light, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 221
Half seen through deepest gloom, and griesly gapes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 629
The smoothest mossy bed and deepest , where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 710
O'erwrought with symbols by the deepest groans Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 198
On forked lightning, to the deepest deep, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 248
And strove who should be smother'd deepest in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 936
Left murmuring, what deepest thought can tell? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 246
In deepest grass, beneath the whisp'ring roof Ode to Psyche, Line 10
 
DEEPNESS..........1
Thou know'st the deepness of his misery. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 551
 
DEEPS.............3
In the very deeps of pleasure, my sole life?"- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 824
Within its pearly house.- The mighty deeps , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 68
On sands, or in great deeps , vermillion turn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 20
 
DEER..............3
And plenty of fat deer for parsons; The Gothic looks solemn, Line 15
Thy deathful bow against some deer -herd bent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 511
Of squirrels, foxes shy, and antler'd deer , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 469
 
DEER'S............2
'Mongst boughs pavillion'd, where the deer's swift leap O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 7
On the deer's tender haunches: late, and loth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 908
 
DEFEAT............1
Writhe at defeat , and nurse your agonies! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 174
 
DEFEATED..........1
[Enter EARL BALDWIN, and Soldiers, as defeated . King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 19b
 
DEFENDER..........2
Thy winning graces; - to be thy defender Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 11
Hails it with tears, her stout defender sent: Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 16
 
DEFIANCE..........3
Look'd high defiance . Lo! his heart 'gan warm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 282
A war-song of defiance 'gainst all hell. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 603
'Mid looks of love, defiance , hate, and scorn, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 69
 
DEFINE............1
Define their pettish limits, and estrange Lamia, Part I, Line 193
 
DEFINITIVELY......1
Definitively on these mighty things; To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 2
 
DEFLOWER'D........1
From vales deflower'd , or forest-trees branch-rent, Lamia, Part II, Line 216
 
DEFORM............1
Died palsy-twitch'd, with meagre face deform ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 376
 
DEFORMITIES.......1
O such deformities ! Old Charon's self, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 503
 
DEFORMITY.........1
Be but the essence of deformity , Sleep and Poetry, Line 298
 
DEFTLY............1
Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 13
 
DEFY..............1
Astounded,- Cupid, I / do thee defy ! The Jealousies, Line 455
 
DEGRADED..........1
Degraded , cold, upon the sodden ground The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 322
 
DEGREE............1
Than see you humbled but a half degree ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 15
 
DEGREES...........7
More self-destroying, leading, by degrees , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 799
Sharpening, by degrees , his appetite Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 220
When 'twas their plan to coax her by degrees Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 167
Along the chapel aisle by slow degrees : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 13
Loosens her fragrant boddice; by degrees The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 229
By faint degrees , voice, lute, and pleasure ceased; Lamia, Part II, Line 265
To count with the toil the innumerable degrees . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 92
 
DEIFY.............1
And deify me, as if some blithe wine Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 118
 
DEIGN.............2
Yet deign , white Queen of Beauty, thy fair eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 976
That this poor face you deign to praise so much; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 110
 
DEIGNS............1
Deigns to reply from heaven or from hell. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 3
 
DEITIES...........3
Again I look'd, and, O ye deities , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 604
Of angry powers: there are deities Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 980
Of deities or mortals, or of both, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 6
 
DEITY.............3
When the great deity , for earth too ripe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 142
And all those acts which Deity supreme Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 111
And all those acts which deity supreme The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 416
 
DEJECTED..........1
At sight of the dejected King of Day, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 380
 
DELAY.............9
Made him delay to let their tender feet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 85
Of a swallow's nest-door, could delay a trace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 753
Wherefore delay , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 649b
And even remembrance of her love's delay . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 464
Who shall delay her flight? And she must chaunt Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 83
I marvel, Albert, you delay so long Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 52
A sad delay . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 63a
Yet why do I delay to spread abroad Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 152
I must delay , and glean my memory The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 467
 
DELAY'D...........2
Not long delay'd , that scar'd the younger Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 71
Whereat the star of Lethe not delay'd Lamia, Part I, Line 81
 
DELAYED...........2
Phoebus awhile delayed his mighty wheels, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 212
That fainting fit was not delayed too late. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, Line 74
 
DELAYING..........2
Andromeda! sweet woman! why delaying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 602
Has our delaying been; but foolish fear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 989
 
DELECTABLE........1
From the God's large eyes; he smil'd delectable , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 901
 
DELIAN............1
To a young Delian oath - aye, by thy soul, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 18
 
DELIBERATE........1
Of such deliberate prologue, serious 'haviour. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 51
 
DELIBERATION......1
Of remedies with some deliberation . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 5
 
DELICACY..........1
The city's delicacy , and the pride The Jealousies, Line 750
 
DELICATE..........14
Of delicate birch trees, or long grass which hems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 51
How tremblingly their delicate ancles spann'd! Calidore: A Fragment, Line 82
With wings of gentle flush o'er delicate white, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 58
Its delicate amber; and the dairy pails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 44
Made delicate from all white-flower bells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 669
Most delicate , as though afraid to smutch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 90
That things of delicate and tenderest worth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 367
With daily boon of fish most delicate : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 369
Delicate , godlike, magic! must I leave Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 84
Completion of all delicate nature's wit! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 36
In times of delicate brilliant ceremony: Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 55
Her nostrils, small, fragrant, fairy- delicate ; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 70
Delicate , put to the proof the lythe Caducean charm. Lamia, Part I, Line 133
She's very delicate ,- not over tall,- The Jealousies, Line 476
 
DELICATELY........1
Gleam delicately through the azure clear: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 409
 
DELICATES.........1
These delicates he heap'd with glowing hand The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 271
 
DELICATEST........2
Sometimes like delicatest lattices, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 614
The delicatest air: air verily, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 882
 
DELICIOUS.........18
Delicious sounds! those little bright-eyed things Calidore: A Fragment, Line 73
Full often dropping a delicious tear, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 13
And as it reaches each delicious ending, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 10
Delicious Avon, with a mournful sound, Sleep and Poetry, Line 214
In some delicious ramble, he had found I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 165
Aye, so delicious is the unsating food, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 816
For as delicious wine doth, sparkling, dive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 511
With airs delicious . In the greenest nook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 668
My lonely madness. Speak, delicious fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 748
Delicious symphonies, like airy flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 798
Of light in light! delicious poisoner! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 987
Of his delicious lady. He who died Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 441
Sang, of delicious love and honey'd dart; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 78
My ebon sofa should delicious be Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 65
Too full of joy and soft delicious warmth; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 266
Fragrant air! Delicious light! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 2
Nor virgin-choir to make delicious moan Ode to Psyche, Line 30
For so delicious were the words she sung, Lamia, Part I, Line 249
 
DELICIOUSLY.......4
With power to dream deliciously ; so wound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 708
Till thou hadst cool'd their cheeks deliciously : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 148
Her silver sandals, ere deliciously Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 501
Growing within, I ate deliciously ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 40
 
DELICIOUSNESS.....4
My sense with their deliciousness was spell'd: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 12
That aye refreshing, pure deliciousness , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 183
Doff all sad fears, thou white deliciousness , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1000
In trammels of perverse deliciousness . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 761
 
DELIGHT...........39
And make superiour each delight . Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 16
Nor with delight can I explore Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 19
On pinions that nought moves but pure delight ; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 3
A fate more pleasing, a delight more true To George Felton Mathew, Line 4
Some mountain breeze had turned its chief delight , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 9
And there into delight my soul deceive. Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 8
Lays have I left of such a dear delight To My Brother George (epistle), Line 81
Shapes of delight , of mystery, and fear, Sleep and Poetry, Line 138
Delight you? Did ye never cluster round Sleep and Poetry, Line 213
Delight it; for it feeds upon the burrs, Sleep and Poetry, Line 244
With their own sweet delight , and ever nestle I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 76
O Maker of sweet poets, dear delight I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 116
Of their dear friends, nigh foolish with delight ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 228
Or to delight thee with fantastic leaping, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 274
Bathing my spirit in a new delight . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 902
To take a fancied city of delight , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 143
On this delight ; for, every minute's space, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 612
Flew a delight half-graspable; his tread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 673
And from all serious Gods; that our delight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 785
I will delight thee all my winding course, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 988
After some warm delight , that seems to perch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 64
No more delight - I bid adieu to all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 141
Thou haply mayst delight in, will I fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 692
His lady smiles; delight is in her face; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 803
Giving delight new joys, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 14
Every delight with sweet remembering, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 13
"To-morrow will I bow to my delight , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 27
Smile through an in-door lattice, all delight . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 200
Young virgins might have visions of delight , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 47
Away, away to our delight ! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR and BREAMA, Line 90
And there shall be for thee all soft delight Ode to Psyche, Line 64
Ay, in the very temple of Delight Ode on Melancholy, Line 25
And sing for my delight , I'd stop my ears! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
Then from amaze into delight he fell Lamia, Part I, Line 324
To unperplex'd delight and pleasure known. Lamia, Part I, Line 327
Against his better self, he took delight Lamia, Part II, Line 73
And Lycius' arms were empty of delight , Lamia, Part II, Line 307
The woof of darkness, thick, for hid delight ; The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 12
A smile of such delight , To Fanny, Line 12
 
DELIGHTED.........7
Rippled delighted up the flowery side; Imitation of Spenser, Line 31
Each opes delighted at thy lay. Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 12
The soul delighted on each accent dwells,- Ode to Apollo, Line 15
I feel delighted , still, that you should read them. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 118
By Arne delighted , or by Handel madden'd; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 111
Of my delighted fancy,- I could brood How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 3
Made a delighted way. Then dance, and song, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 933
 
DELIGHTFUL........4
Delightful : thou thy griefs dost dress To Lord Byron, Line 7
Between two hills. All hail delightful hopes! Sleep and Poetry, Line 264
That smile us on to tell delightful stories. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 124
"About this time,- making delightful way,- The Jealousies, Line 712
 
DELIGHTING........1
Delighting much, to see it half at rest, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 15
 
DELIGHTS..........9
'Mid contradictions her delights to lend. To George Felton Mathew, Line 34
Many delights of that glad day recalling, Sleep and Poetry, Line 329
With his delights ; for when tired out with fun On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 7
But there are left delights as high as these, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 9
He who knows these delights , and, too, is prone On The Story of Rimini, Line 9
Itself, and strives its own delights to hide- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 344
To me new born delights ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 472a
All delights of summer weather; Fancy, Line 32
Of their sorrows and delights ; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 31
 
DELIVER...........1
Deliver me from this rapacious deep!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 332
 
DELIVER'D.........1
Or be deliver'd from this cumbrous flesh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 551
 
DELIVERER.........1
Think, my deliverer , how desolate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 561
 
DELIVERERS........1
The two deliverers tasted a pure wine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 801
 
DELL..............8
Nature's observatory - whence the dell , O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 4
I am no happy shepherd of the dell Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 7
To these founts Protean, passing gulph, and dell , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 627
Those two sad streams adown a fearful dell . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1009
And by another, in deep dell below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 679
In the forest,- and the sodden turfed dell , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 295
Like to a native lily of the dell : Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 366
Her throat in vain, and die, heart-stifled, in her dell . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 207
 
DELLS.............3
In gulf or aerie, mountains or deep dells , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 94
And she forgot the dells where waters run, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 419
Fills forest dells with a pervading air The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 405
 
DELOS.............2
Than the isle of Delos . Echo hence shall stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 966
Rejoice, O Delos , with thine olives green, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 24
 
DELPHI............1
To cheer itself to Delphi . Still his feet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 82
 
DELPHIAN..........1
A Delphian pain- Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 10
 
DELPHIC...........7
Into a delphic labyrinth. I would fain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 3
O Delphic Apollo? God of the golden bow, Line 12
O Delphic Apollo! God of the golden bow, Line 24
O Delphic Apollo? God of the golden bow, Line 36
For still, with Delphic emphasis, she spann'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 499
So on a Delphic reed, my idle spright As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 3
Meantime touch piously the Delphic harp, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 10
 
DELPHOS...........1
Those lips shall be my Delphos , and shall speak Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 713
 
DELUDED...........1
Deluded monarch, 'tis a cruel lie. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 218
 
DELVED............1
Cool'd a long age in the deep- delved earth, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 12
 
DEMAND............4
Demand the holy sisterhood in our name Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 198
In the Emperor's name, I here demand of you Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 128
No, not yet - I disclaim it, and demand King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 41
To half beg, and half demand , respectfully, The Jealousies, Line 30
 
DEMANDS...........2
This mystery demands an audience Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 104
The interview he demands ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 21a
 
DEMEANOUR.........2
In sad demeanour , solemn, undisturb'd, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 330
Bow'd low with high demeanour , and, to pay The Jealousies, Line 741
 
DEMESNE...........3
That deep-brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne ; On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 6
Pray what demesne ? Whose lordship's legacy? Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 6
That royal porch, that high-built fair demesne ; Lamia, Part II, Line 155
 
DEMESNES..........1
Open'd upon the dusk demesnes of night; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 298
 
DEMI..............1
Most like a sojourning demi -god, and leave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 724
 
DEMON.............10
A disguis'd demon , missioned to knit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 701
And let his spirit, like a demon -mole, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 354
Since Merlin paid his Demon all the monstrous debt. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 171
Of witch, and demon , and large coffin-worm, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 374
No god, no demon of severe response, Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 2
I knew to be my demon Poesy. Ode on Indolence, Line 30
Fire of hell! Auranthe - lewd demon ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 64
To that demon ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 153b
Around his demon eyes! Corinthians, see! Lamia, Part II, Line 289
But a fierce demon 'nointed safe from wounds King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 32
 
DEMON'S...........4
As if it were some demon's name pronounc'd Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 82
And therefore kept from me your demon's plot Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 138
Some demon's mistress, or the demon's self. Lamia, Part I, Line 56
Some demon's mistress, or the demon's self. Lamia, Part I, Line 56
 
DEMURE............1
Slow, and demure , and proud in his despair. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 88
 
DEMUREST..........2
And come instead demurest meditation, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 975
And moving with demurest air The Eve of St. Mark, Line 17
 
DEN...............9
Straying about, yet coop'd up in the den Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 928
Fair Pastorella in the bandit's den , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 32
While yet our England was a wolfish den ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 5
There lies a den , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 512b
Sleep may be had in that deep den of all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 525
Pregnant with such a den to save the whole Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 544
It was a den where no insulting light Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 5
Portray'd in many a fiery den Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 15
For lo! the toils are spread around your den , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 67
 
DENIZEN...........3
That am not yet a glorious denizen Sleep and Poetry, Line 48
That am not yet a glorious denizen Sleep and Poetry, Line 54
So stedfastly, that the new denizen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 215
 
DENOTING..........1
soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
DENOUNCE..........2
Our ear is open. First we here denounce Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 113
Join a loud voice to mine, and so denounce Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 150
 
DENS..............1
Huge dens and caverns in a mountain's side: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 650
 
DENSE.............1
One's senses with so dense a breathing stuff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 381
 
DENTES............1
The dentes sapientiae of mice The Jealousies, Line 292
 
DENY..............2
Can it deny the chiefdom of green groves? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 220
You can't deny it. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 128a
 
DEPART............4
Till its echoes depart ; then I sink to repose. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 40
And then depart , if I may be so free, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 79
Conrad, see all depart not wanted here. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 102
Let them depart . Lady Erminia, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 224
 
DEPARTING.........1
And 'tis but echo'd from departing sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 850
 
DEPOSIT...........1
He shall deposit side by side, until Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 705
 
DEPTH.............13
On the far depth where sheeted lightning plays; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 6
Through the cool depth .- It moved as if to flee- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 897
There is no depth to strike in: I can see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 161
Of lucid depth the floor, and far outspread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 879
Or height, or depth , or width, or any chance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 357
Because into his depth Cimmerian Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 375
In thine own depth . Hail, gentle Carian! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 545
With damp and slippery footing from a depth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 85
And every height, and every sullen depth , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 361
Here is no quiet depth of hollow ground. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 47
To see as a God sees, and take the depth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 304
That in its lucid depth reflected pure The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 52
To such a depth !" The Emperor took his robe, The Jealousies, Line 410
 
DEPTHS............2
All other depths are shallow: essences, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 905
Scans all the depths of magic, and expounds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 697
 
DEPUTY............1
Lords, scullions, deputy -scullions, with wild cries The Jealousies, Line 763
 
DES...............1
The Magazin des Modes now open is The Jealousies, Line 283
 
DESCEND...........6
Had more been heard. Thus swell'd it forth: " Descend , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 202
Young mountaineer! descend where alleys bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 203
As those are high, descend ! He ne'er is crown'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 211
The silent mysteries of earth, descend !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 214
When I beheld her on the earth descend , Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 9
Should in a vast circumference descend , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
 
DESCENDED.........3
Whether descended from beneath the rocks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 198
Shamm'd a good snore - the monkey-men descended , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 93
Though a descended Pleiad, will not one Lamia, Part I, Line 265
 
DESCENDING........3
If a cherub, on pinions of silver descending , To Some Ladies, Line 17
As gracefully descending , light and thin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 49
Just within ken, they saw descending thick Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 820
 
DESCENT...........1
And silken traces tighten'd in descent ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 524
 
DESCRIBED.........1
gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions. When she saw herself Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
DESCRIED..........2
Descried an orbed diamond, set to fray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 245
descried , she Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
DESCRY............2
Descry a favourite hamlet faint and far. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 397
Latitude thirty-six; our scouts descry The Jealousies, Line 643
 
DESERT............7
To take him to a desert rude, and bare, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 28
To fainting creatures in a desert wild. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 119
I was a lonely youth on desert shores. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 339
A desert fills our seeing's inward span; To the Nile, Line 4
As palmer's that with weariness mid- desert shrine hath found. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 22
I leave you to the desert of the world Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 230
Above the plains of Gobi,- desert , bleak; The Jealousies, Line 659
 
DESERT'S..........1
Rested amid the desert's dreariment, The Jealousies, Line 394
 
DESERTED..........5
Quicksand and whirlpool, and deserted shore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 202
Deserted all my pickles and preserves, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 13
Deserted , void, nor any haunt of mine. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 240
Such things deserted me and are forgiven, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 83
"You have deserted me;- where am I now? Lamia, Part II, Line 42
 
DESERTS...........1
As to my poor deserts . Come, come, be plain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 86
 
DESERVE...........2
This may be speaking too presumptuously, and may deserve Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Bearing more woe than all his sins deserve . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 176
 
DESIGN............1
Without design indeed,- yet it is so,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
 
DESIGN'D..........1
But put therein some drug design'd Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 3
 
DESIGNS...........1
That he, the servant of their trade designs , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 165
 
DESIRE............9
Fill with superior bliss, or, at desire As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 11
from the desire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
To feel distemper'd longings: to desire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 375
Give me new phoenix wings to fly at my desire . On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 14
My wine - O good! 'tis here at my desire , Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 70
Of heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 54
Or, at thy supreme desire , Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 83
I should desire no better; yet, in truth, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 32
Jove heard his vows, and better'd his desire ; Lamia, Part I, Line 229
 
DESIRED...........1
wept, and desired Apollonius to be silent, but he would not be moved, and Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
DESIRES...........1
In lucent Thames reflected:- warm desires To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 85
 
DESIRING..........1
That heats the sense with lewd desiring ; Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 6
 
DESIST............1
Desist ! or my offended mistress' nod Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 953
 
DESOLATE..........9
Wept that such beauty should be desolate : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 202
Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell On the Sea, Line 2
In desolate places, where dank moisture breeds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 240
Think, my deliverer, how desolate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 561
'Twas vast, and desolate , and icy-cold; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 632
Why have ye left your bowers desolate , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 220
Yet all is still within and desolate . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 528
To make me desolate ? whence came the strength? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 103
Why thou art desolate , can e'er return. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 40
 
DESOLATION........4
Full of sweet desolation - balmy pain. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 162
Nor be my desolation ; and, full oft, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 345
"Why must such desolation betide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 126
Sole priestess of his desolation ."- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 227
 
DESPAIR...........14
Should Disappointment, parent of Despair , To Hope, Line 13
And poisoned was my spirit: despair sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 602
Close up its bloodshot eyes, nor see despair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 308
This beauty in its birth - Despair ! despair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 506
This beauty in its birth - Despair! despair ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 506
Despair forbad his soul to climb O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 62
Or word, or look, or action of despair . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 40
Remorse, spleen, hope, but most of all despair . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 95
Slow, and demure, and proud in his despair . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 88
Despair , or eat thy words! Why, thou wast nigh Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
The tight-wound energies of his despair , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 26
And all its burthens. Gasping with despair The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 398
I know it - and to know it is despair To Fanny, Line 41
"Pho! nonsense!" exclaim'd Hum, "now don't despair : The Jealousies, Line 458
 
DESPAIRING........2
From my despairing breast to charm Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 9
I saw this youth as he despairing stood: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 561
 
DESPAIRS..........1
And leaden-eyed despairs , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 28
 
DESPERATE.........2
How many days! what desperate turmoil! Sleep and Poetry, Line 308
Ah, desperate mortal! I ev'n dar'd to press Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 661
 
DESPERATELY.......1
Heavens! how desperately do I adore Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 10
 
DESPERATION.......1
To desperation ? Is there nought for me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 460
 
DESPITE...........2
His voice leapt out, despite of godlike curb, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 226
Besides, for all his love, in self despite , Lamia, Part II, Line 72
 
DESPONDENCE.......4
And keep that fiend Despondence far aloof. To Hope, Line 12
But off, Despondence ! miserable bane! Sleep and Poetry, Line 281
Spite of despondence , of the inhuman dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 8
Despondence seiz'd again the fallen Gods Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 379
 
DESPONDENCY.......2
Should sad Despondency my musings fright, To Hope, Line 9
Our spirit's wings: despondency besets Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 22
 
DESPONDING........1
Desponding , o'er the marble floor's cold thrill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 338
 
DESPONDINGLY......2
O Music, Music, breathe despondingly ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 434
O Music, Music, breathe despondingly ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 482
 
DESTINE...........1
Of youth, and destine thee towards a tomb. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 592
 
DESTINIES.........1
Who from Olympus watch our destinies ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 605
 
DESTINY...........5
But that cruel destiny Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 48
And I shall ever bless my destiny , To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 10
His destiny , alert he stood: but when Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 334
"We are twin brothers in this destiny ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 713
Or be by phantoms duped. O destiny ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 629
 
DESTROY...........2
And ev'ry rural bliss destroy , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 18
Disjoin those hands - part - part - do not destroy Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
 
DESTROY'D.........3
Must do the thing, or both will be destroy'd ."- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 711
Destroy'd ?- how many tit bits stolen? Gaze To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 3
Destroy'd the work of every fist O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 15
 
DESTROYING........1
More self- destroying , leading, by degrees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 799
 
DESTROYINGS.......1
Creations and destroyings , all at once Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 116
 
DESTROYS..........1
Such as once heard, in gentle heart, destroys Lamia, Part I, Line 36
 
DESTRUCTION.......3
Waiting for some destruction - when lo, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 330
Of an eternal fierce destruction , Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 97
Still do I that most fierce destruction see, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 102
 
DETAIN............1
Detain us! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 54a
 
DETERMINE.........1
Till we determine some fit punishment. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 239
 
DETESTABLE........1
From this gross, detestable , filthy mesh, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 552
 
DETESTED..........3
And from detested moods in new romance Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 111
Detested - Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 59a
Tell me where that detested woman is, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 3
 
DETESTING.........1
A man detesting all inhuman crime; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 137
 
DETHE.............1
Of Sainte Markis life and dethe ." The Eve of St. Mark, Line 114
 
DETHRONED.........1
'Twas love; cold,- dead indeed, but not dethroned . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 400
 
DETHRONEMENT......1
In midst of this dethronement horrible. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 315
 
DETRACTION........1
On earth the good man base detraction bars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 13
 
DEUCALION.........1
Like old Deucalion mountain'd o'er the flood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 197
 
DEVELOPING........1
In ponderous stone, developing the mood Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 132
 
DEVIATING.........1
For deviating so; All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 34
 
DEVICE............1
And diamonded with panes of quaint device , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 211
 
DEVIL.............4
All to the devil ! O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 42
A she devil ! A dragon! I her imp! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 63
To entice the devil to your help, that he Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
(Who wish to give the devil her due) declare The Jealousies, Line 745
 
DEVIL'S...........4
Founded with many a mason- devil's groan. Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 48
To girth my saddle! And those devil's beads Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
You suffocate me! Stop this devil's parley, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 133
All things turn'd topsy-turvy in a devil's dance. The Jealousies, Line 756
 
DEVILISH..........1
O cursed Conrad! devilish Auranthe! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 4
 
DEVILS............1
Tell me,- the league of devils ? Confess - confess- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 88
 
DEVISE............5
And wonders; struggles to devise some blame; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 716
For as Apollo each eve doth devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 463
And then to die alone. Who can devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 692
New singing for our maids shalt thou devise , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 839
Possess whatever bliss thou canst devise , Lamia, Part I, Line 85
 
DEVISED...........1
When the full morning came, she had devised Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 337
 
DEVISING..........1
And, as for him some gift she was devising , To George Felton Mathew, Line 81
 
DEVON.............1
Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 1
 
DEVOTE............1
Wilt thou devote this body to the earth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 731
 
DEVOTED...........2
From these devoted eyes their silver store, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 434
Devoted to heaven's pious ministries, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 192
 
DEVOTION..........1
Come to pay devotion due- Not Aladdin magian, Line 33
 
DEVOUR............1
And hearkening for a love-sound, doth devour Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 11
 
DEVOUT............5
Had died in mutual arms devout and true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 793
Was the warm tremble of a devout kiss,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 744
Warm, tremulous, devout , psalterian. Lamia, Part I, Line 114
Lycius then press'd her hand, with devout touch, Lamia, Part II, Line 249
My devout lips, than side by side we stood, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 292
 
DEVOUTE...........1
And kissen devoute the holy croce. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 107
 
DEVOUTLY..........1
While 'gainst his forehead he devoutly press'd Calidore: A Fragment, Line 105
 
DEW...............41
'Tis morn, and the flowers with dew are yet drooping, To Some Ladies, Line 13
The dew by fairy feet swept from the green, To George Felton Mathew, Line 26
When steep'd in dew rich to intoxication. Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 11
Ah! I will taste that dew , for me 'tis meet, Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 12
Are upward turn'd to catch the heavens' dew . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 23
Or that the evening dew had pearl'd their tresses, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 89
What time the sky-lark shakes the tremulous dew To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 2
A fragile dew -drop on its perilous way Sleep and Poetry, Line 86
Bared its eternal bosom, and the dew Sleep and Poetry, Line 190
Mingler with leaves, and dew and tumbling streams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 119
'Tis with dew bespread. Hither, hither, love, Line 8
Of flowers budded newly; and the dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 91
But let a portion of ethereal dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 131
About me; and the pearliest dew not brings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 469
Dew -dabbled on their stalks, the ouzel sung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 683
He seem'd to taste a drop of manna- dew , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 766
Dew -drops, and dewy buds, and leaves, and flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 900
One kiss brings honey- dew from buried days. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 7
Dew -dropping melody, in the Carian's ear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 373
Disparts a dew -lipp'd rose. Above his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 407
A willow-bough, distilling odorous dew , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 424
Spun off a drizzling dew ,- which falling chill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 520
Leaving a trickling dew . At last they shot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 922
The dew of her rich speech: ' Ah! Art awake? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 429
A clammy dew is beading on my brow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 568
On all the multitude a nectarous dew . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 892
There is no lightning, no authentic dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 78
High as the eagles. Like two drops of dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 348
Ye tender bibbers of the rain and dew , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 571
Left thee so quiet on this bed of dew ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 624
And warm with dew at ooze from living blood! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 667
Will drop their scarlet berry cups of dew ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 674
And sorrel untorn by the dew -claw'd stag: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 685
Its sides I'll plant with dew -sweet eglantine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 697
Her wine was dew o' the wild white rose, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 7
Blushing through the mist and dew , Fancy, Line 14
With anguish moist and fever dew , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 10
And honey wild, and manna dew , La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 26
A wrathful dew . O folly! why did I Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 222
Wither'd at dew so sweet and virulent; Lamia, Part I, Line 149
Why does your tender palm dissolve in dew ?"- Lamia, Part I, Line 370
 
DEWDROPS..........1
And tears 'mong the dewdrops of morning oft glistened. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 32
 
DEWINESS..........1
And when again your dewiness he kisses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 53
 
DEWS..............6
When summer nights the dews bestow, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 9
That thou mayst listen the cold dews among? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 163
Their footing through the dews ; and to him said, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 180
Then in a silken scarf,- sweet with the dews Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 409
With the self-same dews that fell Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 27
Still with the dews of piety, this meek lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
 
DEWY..............21
A dewy flower, oft would that hand appear, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 41
Thrilling liquidity of dewy piping. Sleep and Poetry, Line 371
Fair dewy roses brush against our faces, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 133
And haply you will say the dewy birth To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 5
And oftentimes he feels the dewy drops This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 5
Dew-drops, and dewy buds, and leaves, and flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 900
A dewy luxury was in his eyes; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 676
A dewy balm upon them!- fear no more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 983
And mesh my dewy flowers all the night. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 157
About the dewy forest, whisper tales?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 131
Or is't thy dewy hand the daisy tips? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 151
This is this world - sweet dewy blossom!"- Woe! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 320
All gather'd in the dewy morning: hie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 579
And poesied with hers in dewy rhyme: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 70
His dewy rosary on the eglantine." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 188
Its eyes, though wild, were still all dewy bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 289
The brethren's skulls mourn, dewy wet, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 5
From dewy sward or thorny spray; Fancy, Line 34
To the eastern gates, and full six dewy hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 264
The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 49
Sceptre, and mantle, clasp'd with dewy gem, Lamia, Part I, Line 4
 
DEXTEROUS.........1
By dexterous policy, from the rebel's axe; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 7
 
DEXTEROUSLY.......1
His armour was so dexterously wrought Calidore: A Fragment, Line 116


About this Page

Published @ RC

March 2005