Di-Don - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
DIADEM............9
Outvieing all the buds in Flora's diadem . Imitation of Spenser, Line 36
Bright as the humming-bird's green diadem , On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 3
Smiling beneath a coral diadem , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 776
When, from thy diadem , a silver gleam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 954
Upon rough marble diadem , that hill's eternal crown. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 44
Naked and bare of its great diadem , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 101
Maturing to a weighty diadem ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 31
Before King Oberon's bright diadem , Lamia, Part I, Line 3
The diadem ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 36
 
DIADEMS...........2
Had not yet lost those starry diadems I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 6
A dusky empire and its diadems ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 224
 
DIAMOND...........16
Some diamond water drops, and them to treasure To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 9
In which a trembling diamond never lingers. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 20
Pink robes, and wavy hair, and diamond jar, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 7
And flowering laurels spring from diamond vases; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 134
Reflects upon a diamond , my sweet dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 677
Descried an orbed diamond , set to fray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 245
And, at the last, a diamond balustrade, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 597
His diamond path with fretwork, streaming round Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 608
The diamond path? And does it indeed end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 652
In prospect,- diamond gleams, and golden glows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 837
The moon put forth a little diamond peak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 497
And that affectionate light, those diamond things, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 717
And all for nothing my new diamond cross, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 11
And diamond -paved lustrous long arcades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 220
And spouting exhalations, diamond fires, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 46
And diamond paved lustrous long arcades. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 56
 
DIAMONDED.........1
And diamonded with panes of quaint device, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 211
 
DIAMONDING........1
Their glassy diamonding on Turkish floor; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 30
 
DIAMONDS..........2
With all its diamonds trembling through and through? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 58
For of superfluous diamonds I as well may thin it. The Jealousies, Line 621
 
DIAN..............10
Sacred to Dian ? Haply, thou hast seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 512
A quiver'd Dian . Stepping awfully, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 262
Of help from Dian : so that when again Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 300
Such tenderness as mine? Great Dian , why, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 937
"What can I do, Alpheus? Dian stands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1005
Dian had chaced away that heaviness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 138
For Dian play: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 585
To Empress Dian , for a hunting spear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 703
Of jubilee to Dian :- truth I heard? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 876
To Dian , Queen of Earth, and Heaven, and Hell. To Homer, Line 14
 
DIAN'S............11
A hymn from Dian's temple; while upswelling, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 197
Or art, impossible! a nymph of Dian's , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 692
Sweet Arethusa! Dian's self must feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 984
Would melt at thy sweet breath.- By Dian's hind Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 277
Its mistress' lips? Not thou?- 'Tis Dian's : lo! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 429
"Who, who from Dian's feast would be away? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 563
In Dian's face they read the gentle lore: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 833
Of Dian's sisterhood; and, kind lady, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 886
Behind great Dian's temple. I'll be yon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 914
May have crumpt up a pair of Dian's legs, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 9
Brows'd by none but Dian's fawns; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 12
 
DIANA.............1
Came chaste Diana from her shady bower, To George Felton Mathew, Line 79
 
DIANA'S...........1
Cherishingly Diana's timorous limbs;- Sleep and Poetry, Line 373
 
DIARY.............1
Thus Crafticant pursues his diary :- The Jealousies, Line 641
 
DIBBLE............1
In sowing time ne'er would I dibble take, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 153
 
DICTATE...........1
Dictate my task. Sweet woman,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 39a
 
DICTIONARY........1
from Bayle's Dictionary , and had copied a long Latin note from that work. The Jealousies, Keats's Note to Line 403
 
DIDO..............2
I could e'en Dido of her grief beguile; Imitation of Spenser, Line 21
Though Dido silent is in under-grove, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 99
 
DIDST.............26
Was night to thy fair morning! Thou didst die Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 7
Apollo chang'd thee; how thou next didst seem To George Felton Mathew, Line 86
And when thou first didst in that mirror trace To George Felton Mathew, Line 88
O why didst thou pity and beg for a worm? God of the golden bow, Line 20
That time thou didst adorn, with amber studs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 924
Why didst thou hear her prayer? O that I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 938
And as I grew in years, still didst thou blend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 162
She came, and thou didst fade, and fade away- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 177
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 4
Long didst thou sit amid our regions wild Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 8
Apollo's garland:- yet didst thou divine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 12
A higher summons:- still didst thou betake Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 16
Didst thou not after other climates call, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 142
Where didst thou melt to? By thee will I sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 632
Whither didst melt? Ah, what of that!- all good Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 668
His eyes are on thee bent, as thou didst poise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 843
If thou didst ever any thing believe, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 59
Where thou didst dream alone on budded bays, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 3
O bag-pipe, thou didst steal my heart away; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 9
O Stranger, thou my nerves from pipe didst charm; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 10
O bag-pipe, thou didst reassert thy sway; Of late two dainties were before me plac'd, Line 11
The holy missal; thou didst craze O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 45
Thou canst not surely be the same that thou didst seem." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 144
Didst find a lyre all golden by thy side, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 63
The only sad one; for thou didst not hear Lamia, Part I, Line 72
Into like gardens thou didst pass erewhile, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 179
 
DIE...............64
Hadst caught the tones, nor suffered them to die . To Lord Byron, Line 5
Was night to thy fair morning! Thou didst die Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 7
Nor e'er will the music of Oberon die . On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 36
And die away in ardent mutterings. Sleep and Poetry, Line 40
Of flowering bays, that I may die a death Sleep and Poetry, Line 58
Their youth away, and die ? 'Twas even so: Sleep and Poetry, Line 219
O may these joys be ripe before I die . Sleep and Poetry, Line 269
Begun in gentleness die so away. Sleep and Poetry, Line 314
By infant hands, left on the path to die . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 46
Therefore no lover did of anguish die : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 236
Of godlike hardship tells me I must die On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 4
If I die and wither Hither, hither, love, Line 23
I shall die content. Hither, hither, love, Line 24
Oh! 'twas born to die . Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 8
foundations are too sandy. It is just that this youngster should die away: a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
They alway must be with us, or we die . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 33
Let his divinity o'er-flowing die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 143
That needs must die , although its little beam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 676
Have been content to let occasion die , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 822
And here I bid it die . Have not I caught, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 986
Revive, dear youth, or I shall faint and die ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 766
Mutter'd: "What lonely death am I to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 258
Or give me to the air, or let me die ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 542
Only I pray, as fairest boon, to die , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 550
And then to die alone. Who can devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 692
And he oppressed. Yet he shall not die , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 695
He shall not die . Moreover, and in chief, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 701
All lovers, whom fell storms have doom'd to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 722
"O I shall die ! sweet Venus, be my stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1010
I die - I hear her voice - I feel my wing-" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1012
Of native air - let me but die at home." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 37
Ah, shouldst thou die from my heart-treachery!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 469
Ourselves at once to vengeance; we might die ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 758
We might embrace and die : voluptuous thought! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 759
And with them shall I die ; nor much it grieves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 935
To die , when summer dies on the cold sward. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 936
That I should die with it: so in all this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 941
And thus to be cast out, thus lorn to die , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 959
Portion'd us - happy days, or else to die ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 332
For Isabel, sweet Isabel, will die ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 486
Will die a death too lone and incomplete, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 487
Rounded by thee, my song should die away, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 12
Sweet little red feet! why would you die ? I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 5
Her throat in vain, and die , heart-stifled, in her dell. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 207
In men who die .- This is the grief, O Son! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 335
Die into life: so young Apollo anguish'd: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 130
Now more than ever seems it rich to die , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 55
She dwells with Beauty - Beauty that must die ; Ode on Melancholy, Line 21
Soft beauty! by to-morrow I should die , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13
What swift death wilt thou die ? As to the lady Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 171
May carry that with him shall make him die Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 52
Alas! he must not die ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 57b
If he survive one hour, then may I die Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 11
Must I stop here? Here solitary die ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 18
Good Ethelbert, shall I die in peace with you? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 172
Die , my lord! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Erminia, Line 173a
Even as thou vanishest so I shall die . Lamia, Part I, Line 260
molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
A fly is in the milk pot - must he die Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 8
But bare of laurel they live, dream, and die ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 7
These steps, die on that marble where thou art. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 108
What 'tis to die and live again before The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 142
Withhold no atom's atom or I die , I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 10
I plunged into the crowd to find him or to die . The Jealousies, Line 783
 
DIED..............17
Fill'd out its voice, and died away again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 116
And how he died : and then, that love doth scathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 733
He might have died : but now, with cheered feel, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 139
Had died in mutual arms devout and true, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 793
And while it died away a shade pass'd by, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 325
Of his delicious lady. He who died Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 441
But starv'd and died . My sweetest Indian, here, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 648
And she had died in drowsy ignorance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 265
And so she pined, and so she died forlorn, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 497
By bards who died content in pleasant sward, Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 7
She died full long agone! Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 30
One who was great through mortal days and died of fame unshorn. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 12
He died ere superstition's gall O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 59
I had a dove, and the sweet dove died , I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 1
And I have thought it died of grieving; I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 2
Its little smoke, in pallid moonshine, died : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 200
Died palsy-twitch'd, with meagre face deform; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 376
 
DIES..............15
But ah! I am no knight whose foeman dies ; Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 5
In one moment dies ; Hither, hither, love, Line 16
She dies at the thinnest cloud; her loveliness Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 81
To twinkle on my bosom? No one dies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 49
To die, when summer dies on the cold sward. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 936
Love never dies , but lives, immortal Lord: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 397
Which comes upon the silence, and dies off, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 77
Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 26
Good, good; he dies . You go, say you? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 181b
He dies ! 'Tis well she do not advertise Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 14
[ALBERT dies . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 48b
[ Dies . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D.a to Line 195
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies ; To Autumn, Line 29
While the wide din of battle dies away King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 3
Cunningly-station'd music dies and swells The Jealousies, Line 570
 
DIEST.............1
For if thou diest , my love, I know not where to go." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 315
 
DIETED............1
For I would not be dieted with praise, Ode on Indolence, Line 53
 
DIFFERENT.........3
But 'tis impossible; far different cares To George Felton Mathew, Line 17
Yes, thousands in a thousand different ways Sleep and Poetry, Line 148
Who sung far different notes into mine ears. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 42
 
DIFFICULT.........2
Revenge is difficult . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 44a
With more bad bitter grain, too difficult Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 175
 
DIFFUS'D..........1
Diffus'd unseen throughout eternal space: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 318
 
DIFFUSES..........1
The thought of this great partnership diffuses To George Felton Mathew, Line 8
 
DIG...............1
To dig more fervently than misers can. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 368
 
DIGHT.............1
Able to face an owl's, they still are dight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 10
 
DIGNITIES.........1
To your high dignities , we are too happy. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 127
 
DIGNITY...........1
You rob me of myself; my dignity Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 119
 
DILATE............1
To serve our joys, would lengthen and dilate . To J.R., Line 8
 
DILIGENCE.........2
Leaving your cares to one whose diligence Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 79
Of diligence , I shall remember you The Jealousies, Line 354
 
DILIGENT..........2
By my diligent springs; my level lilies, shells, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 115
But retail dealers, diligent , let loose The Jealousies, Line 210
 
DILIGENTLY........1
Who know him not. Each diligently bends Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 895
 
DIM...............21
Than wings of swans, than doves, than dim -seen eagle? Sleep and Poetry, Line 22
An ocean dim , sprinkled with many an isle, Sleep and Poetry, Line 306
Such dim -conceived glories of the brain On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 9
By the dim echoes of old Triton's horn: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 206
Whose eyelids curtain'd up their jewels dim , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 394
The which became more strange, and strange, and dim , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 570
Of a wide outlet, fathomless and dim , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 272
Through a dim passage, searching till he found Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 709
Dovelike in the dim cell lying beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 65
Who lives beyond earth's boundary, grief is dim , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 620
See what is coming from the distance dim ! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 55
For they resolved in some forest dim Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 175
From fright of dim espial. Safe at last, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 185
And twilight saints, and dim emblazonings, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 215
Made a dim , silver twilight, soft he set The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 254
'Mid water mint and cresses dim ; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 34
And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 11
And with thee fade away into the forest dim : Ode to a Nightingale, Line 20
My sleep had been embroider'd with dim dreams; Ode on Indolence, Line 42
Now on the moth-time of that evening dim Lamia, Part I, Line 220
The one he struck stone blind, the other's eyes wox dim . In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 9
 
DIMINISHING.......1
And from the rear diminishing away,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 831
 
DIMLY.............3
The golden lyre itself were dimly seen: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 12
Yet further off, are dimly seen their bowers, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 43
Struggling, and blood, and shrieks - all dimly fades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 10
 
DIMNESS...........3
That through the dimness of their twilight show Calidore: A Fragment, Line 48
From the blue dome, though I to dimness gaze To My Brother George (epistle), Line 5
To see the sun o'er peep the eastern dimness , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 86
 
DIMPLE............1
There may not be one dimple on her hand, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 6
 
DIMPLED...........3
Soft dimpled hands, white neck, and creamy breast, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 16
That nestled in his arms. A dimpled hand, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 93
To your dimpled arms. Once more sweet life begin!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 506
 
DIMPLES...........2
Lured by the innocent dimples . To sweet rest To My Brother George (epistle), Line 101
If smiles, if dimples , tongues for ardour mute, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 441
 
DIMPLING..........1
And fish were dimpling , as if good nor ill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 136
 
DIN...............5
Now while I cannot hear the city's din ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 40
O Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 54
From kissing cymbals made a merry din - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 198
Gone, the merry morris din ; Robin Hood, Line 33
While the wide din of battle dies away King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 3
 
DINE..............1
These lures I straight forget, - e'en ere I dine , Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 24
 
DINN'D............1
Leave the dinn'd air vibrating silverly. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 128
 
DINNED............1
O ye whose ears are dinned with uproar rude, On the Sea, Line 11
 
DINNER............1
No dinner many a noon, Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 14
 
DINT..............1
Of majesty, by dint of passion keen, The Jealousies, Line 349
 
DINTED............1
Adventurous knights take up their dinted shields: To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 4
 
DIP...............6
Dip so refreshingly its wings, and breast Calidore: A Fragment, Line 16
Those marble steps that through the water dip : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 68
And, at that moment, felt my body dip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 663
And, downward, suddenly began to dip , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 87
Yield, Stephen, or my sword's point dip in King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 16
They dip , move on, and with them moves a glow The Jealousies, Line 556
 
DIPP'D............4
And all around it dipp'd luxuriously Imitation of Spenser, Line 28
Not to have dipp'd in love's most gentle stream. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 182
No reveller had ever dipp'd a chin Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 128
They dipp'd their swords in the water, and did tease Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 222
 
DIPP'DST..........1
Of icy pinnacles, and dipp'dst thine arms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 208
 
DIPP'ST...........1
Thou dipp'st them in the taintless wave; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 32
 
DIPS..............3
O horrid dream - see how his body dips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 12
He plucks it, dips its stalk in the water: how! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 58
Inverts it - dips the handle, and lo, soon Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 11
 
DIPT..............3
And soon it lightly dipt , and rose, and sank, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 425
And dipt again, with the young couple's weight,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 426
Had dipt his rod in it: such garland wealth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 563
 
DIRE..............3
For thou art weak to sing such tumults dire : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 4
Names, deeds, gray legends, dire events, rebellions, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 114
For as upon the earth dire prodigies The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 18
 
DIRECT............4
Now I direct my eyes into the west, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 139
Shall stand before him; whom he shall direct Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 709
Whence could be seen, direct , a golden gate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 855
Thus sprang direct towards the Galaxy. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 487
 
DIRECTLY..........1
Making directly for the woodland altar. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 127
 
DIREST............3
His memory, your direst , foulest shame? Lines Written on 29 May, Line 2
The next, the last, the direst of the three, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 28
There saw she direst strife; the supreme God Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 92
 
DIRGE.............3
Let us too! - but be our dirge Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 19
A dirge of kisses. Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 20
That I must chaunt thy lady's dirge , Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 2
 
DIS...............2
Glaring the angry witch. O Dis , even now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 567
Whose bugle?" he inquires: they smile - "O Dis ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 427
 
DISABLED..........1
Disabled age shall seize thee; and even then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 595
 
DISANOINTING......1
A disanointing poison: so that Thea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 98
 
DISAPPEAR.........1
But, at that very touch, to disappear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 92
 
DISAPPEAR'D.......2
And Albert too has disappear'd ; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 130b
Melted and disappear'd as suddenly; Lamia, Part I, Line 166
 
DISAPPOINTMENT....4
Should Disappointment , parent of Despair, To Hope, Line 13
The disappointment . Time, that aged nurse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 705
The disappointment , the anxiety, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 154
Of disappointment stuck in me so sore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 481
 
DISARM'D..........1
How dare, against a man disarm'd ? King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, De Kaims, Line 20b
 
DISCERN'D.........2
With those beauties, scarce discern'd , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 26
To mark if her dark eyes had yet discern'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 505
 
DISCIPLE..........1
His young disciple . "'Tis no common rule, Lamia, Part II, Line 164
 
DISCLAIM..........1
No, not yet - I disclaim it, and demand King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 41
 
DISCLOS'D.........2
Disclos'd the thunder-gloomings in Jove's air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 872
Of the wide doors disclos'd a place unknown Lamia, Part I, Line 388
 
DISCLOSES.........1
And when the moon her pallid face discloses , Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 13
 
DISCOLOURED.......1
Not the discoloured poisons of a fen, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 22
 
DISCOMFORT........1
What horrors may discomfort thee and me. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 468
 
DISCONTENT........5
Of helpless discontent ,- hurling my lance Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 929
Who, thus far, discontent , has dared to tread, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 36
Or discontent , perhaps from both; O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 20
Contented fools causes for discontent , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 40
In pale contented sort of discontent , Lamia, Part II, Line 135
 
DISCORD...........2
And discord unconfoundedst,- Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 13
What discord is at ferment in this house? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 273
 
DISCOURS'D........1
There they discours'd upon the fragile bar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 360
 
DISCOURSE.........1
It seem'd you were in deep discourse together; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 84
 
DISCOURSING.......2
Throughout my bondage." Thus discoursing , on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 723
Kept up among the guests, discoursing low Lamia, Part II, Line 201
 
DISCOVER..........2
Round my fire-side, and haply there discover Sleep and Poetry, Line 72
By patient scrutiny, we may discover Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 242
 
DISCOVER'D........1
And she her half- discover'd revels keeping. To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 12
 
DISCOVERED........4
And half discovered wings, and glances keen. On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 8
AURANTHE and CONRAD discovered . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
OTHO, ERMINIA, ETHELBERT, and a Physician, discovered . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
DISCOVERIES.......1
Advantage of your chance discoveries Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 116
 
DISCREET..........1
to behold. The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet , able to Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
 
DISCREPANT........1
Plaining discrepant between sea and sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 342
 
DISDAIN...........3
And back retir'd, not cool'd by high disdain ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 61
Whether through poz'd conviction, or disdain , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 244
He pass'd the hurdy-gurdies with disdain , The Jealousies, Line 222
 
DISDAIN'D.........1
Ungrateful baldpate, have I not disdain'd Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 11
 
DISDAINLY.........1
O look not so disdainly ! Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 8
 
DISENTANGLING.....1
The which, in disentangling for their fire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 929
 
DISENTHRAL........1
Thee, gentle lady, did he disenthral : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 608
 
DISESE............1
Than I, for I n'ad sicknesse nor disese ." Chaucer Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
 
DISFIGURE.........1
Which now disfigure her fair growing stem, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 136
 
DISGRACE..........4
Have spoken? that from hastening disgrace Sleep and Poetry, Line 271
Though now upon my head he heaps disgrace . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 46
And will be, for I love such fair disgrace . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 85
But from the ashes of disgrace he rose Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 134
 
DISGUIS'D.........1
A disguis'd demon, missioned to knit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 701
 
DISGUISE..........2
I knew you through disguise . You are the Arab! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 127
So taking a disguise ;- you shall behold her! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 72
 
DISGUISED.........1
Was it a silent deep- disguised plot Ode on Indolence, Line 13
 
DISGUST...........2
My waking must have been! disgust , and hate, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 562
As these prodigious sycophants disgust Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 25
 
DISH..............1
Robes, golden tongs, censer, and chafing dish , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 79
 
DISHES............3
On golden dishes and in baskets bright The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 272
Off Glocester's golden dishes - drinks pure wine, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 28
A tureen, and three dishes , at one swoop, The Jealousies, Line 670
 
DISHEVELL'D.......1
God of warm pulses, and dishevell'd hair, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 984
 
DISHONOUR.........1
That camp-mushroom, dishonour of our house; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 80
 
DISJOIN...........1
Disjoin those hands - part - part - do not destroy Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 43
 
DISJOINED.........1
As if disjoined by soft-handed slumber, Ode to Psyche, Line 18
 
DISJOINTED........1
Things all disjointed come from north and south, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 5
 
DISMAL............9
And thought it Pegasus. Ah dismal soul'd! Sleep and Poetry, Line 187
Thy loveliness in dismal elements; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 312
Went through the dismal air like one huge Python Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 530
And went into that dismal forest-hearse. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 344
At sight of such a dismal labouring, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 379
And struck a lamp from the dismal coal, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 70
And all along a dismal rack of clouds, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 302
Lay vast and edgeways; like a dismal cirque Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 34
More dismal cares What can I do to drive away, Line 28
 
DISMALLY..........1
Even these words went echoing dismally Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 322
 
DISMAY............4
Kept off dismay , and terror, and alarm Calidore: A Fragment, Line 145
Sad sign of ruin, sudden dismay , and fall! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 336
Should fright her silken casements, and dismay Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 4
For ruin and dismay they well foresaw, The Jealousies, Line 12
 
DISMAY'D..........3
Half seeing visions that might have dismay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 874
Dismay'd ; and, like a wretch from whom the rack Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 256
Proving upon this element, dismay'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 617
 
DISMISS...........1
Truth is, the Emperor would fain dismiss Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 16
 
DISMISS'D.........2
Instant dismiss'd the Council from his sight, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 20
No, no, you have dismiss'd me; and I go Lamia, Part II, Line 44
 
DISMOUNTING.......1
The Princess took it and, dismounting straight, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 69
 
DISOBEDIENCE......1
No, I have no plea. Disobedience , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 106
 
DISPART...........1
Intrigue with the specious chaos, and dispart Lamia, Part I, Line 195
 
DISPARTED.........2
Of thy disparted nymphs? Through what dark tree Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 308
Disparted , and far upward could be seen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 517
 
DISPARTS..........1
Disparts a dew-lipp'd rose. Above his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 407
 
DISPATCH..........1
Something of quick dispatch , for should she hear, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 168
 
DISPEL............1
To look so plainly through them? to dispel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 328
 
DISPLACE..........1
If one of her soft ringlets I displace , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 148
 
DISPLAY...........3
For over them was seen a free display Sleep and Poetry, Line 392
Her long black hair swell'd ampler, in display Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 984
Should look through four large windows, and display Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 28
 
DISPLAY'D.........1
For thou shalt hear this secret all display'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 308
 
DISPOSSESSOR......1
My dispossessor ? Have ye seen his face? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 233
 
DISPUTE...........1
Adieu! for, once again, the fierce dispute On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 5
 
DISRELISH.........1
Peers with disrelish , grey, barren, and cold! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 41
 
DISSEMBLING.......1
And from her own pure self no joy dissembling , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 17
 
DISSIPATE.........1
To dissipate the shadows of this hell! What can I do to drive away, Line 45
 
DISSOLV'D.........4
Till, in his soul dissolv'd , they come to be Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 7
The Spirit mourn'd "Adieu!"- dissolv'd , and left Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 321
Dissolv'd , or brighter shone, or interwreathed Lamia, Part I, Line 52
These words dissolv'd : Crete's forests heard no more. Lamia, Part I, Line 170
 
DISSOLVE..........3
Dissolve the frozen purity of air; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 586
Fade far away, dissolve , and quite forget Ode to a Nightingale, Line 21
Why does your tender palm dissolve in dew?"- Lamia, Part I, Line 370
 
DISSOLVING........1
Or the old eyes dissolving at his woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 400
 
DISTANCE..........12
Their ladies fair, that in the distance seem To My Brother George (epistle), Line 37
That distance of recognizance bereaves, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 13
Or of the distance from home's pleasant lair: Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 8
By one, who at a distance loud halloo'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 344
Seems at the distance like a crescent moon: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 544
Sepulchral from the distance all around. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 486
See what is coming from the distance dim! Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 55
The Country, with the Castle in the distance . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Setting
[AURANTHE shrieks at a distance . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 30b
Mutter'd, like tempest in the distance brew'd, Lamia, Part I, Line 353
To travel such a distance through the sky, The Jealousies, Line 489
Still emptied, at meet distance , here and there, The Jealousies, Line 743
 
DISTANT...........3
Where distant ships do seem to show their keels, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 211
And thou art distant in Humanity. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 312
Distant harvest-carols clear; Fancy, Line 40
 
DISTEMPER'D.......1
To feel distemper'd longings: to desire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 375
 
DISTILL...........1
Which, pure from mossy beds, did down distill , Imitation of Spenser, Line 5
 
DISTILLING........2
A willow-bough, distilling odorous dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 424
And I distilling from it thence to run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 944
 
DISTINCT..........5
But I saw too distinct into the core Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 96
Distinct , and visible; symbols divine, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 316
So white the linen; so, in some, distinct The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 76
The pain alone; the joy alone; distinct : The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 174
The poet and the dreamer are distinct , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 199
 
DISTINCTNESS......1
Was woven in with black distinctness ; storm, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 200
 
DISTINGUISHABLE...1
No shape distinguishable , more than when Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 79
 
DISTRACT..........2
But my poor mistress went distract and mad, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 473
Who was it hurried by me so distract ? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 83
 
DISTRACTED........4
I was distracted ; madly did I kiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 653
Hurry distracted from Sol's temperate beam, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1003
Distracted with the richest overflow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 805
Shall sprawl distracted ! O that that dull cowl Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
 
DISTRAUGHT........2
Until my head was dizzy and distraught . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 565
Is my eternal essence thus distraught Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 232
 
DISTRESS..........5
Soothing with placid brow our late distress , On Peace, Line 3
Of fair-hair'd Milton's eloquent distress , Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 11
A woman's sigh alone and in distress ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 55
And Isabella's was a great distress , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 100
Crept silently, and waited in distress , The Jealousies, Line 337
 
DISTRESS'D........1
A hand heaven made to succour the distress'd ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 106
 
DISTRUST..........1
To breed distrust and hate, that make the soft voice hiss. Lamia, Part II, Line 10
 
DISTURB...........1
Disturb my slumber of a thousand years? Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 22
 
DISTURB'D.........4
What whisperer disturb'd his gloomy rest? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 97
Wherewith disturb'd , she utter'd a soft moan: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 294
The sacred seasons might not be disturb'd . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 293
The cause for which you have disturb'd us here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 115
 
DISTURBANCE.......1
But no confusion, no disturbance rude How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 7
 
DISTURBING........1
Disturbing the grand sea. A drainless shower Sleep and Poetry, Line 235
 
DITAMY............1
Of sacred ditamy , and poppies red: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 555
 
DITCH.............1
With dyke and ditch For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 26
 
DITCHES...........1
And ditches There was a naughty boy, Line 44
 
DITTIES...........4
Old ditties sigh above their father's grave; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 788
The mellow ditties from a mourning tongue?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 160
Many upon thy death have ditties made; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 836
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone: Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 14
 
DITTO.............1
Comb ditto There was a naughty boy, Line 14
 
DITTY.............9
Their share of the ditty . After them appear'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 163
A heavy ditty , and the sullen day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 684
This ditty to her!- tell her' - so I stay'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 959
I have a ditty for my hollow cell." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 130
For the mere sake of truth; as 'tis a ditty Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 829
Some old hunting ditty , while Robin Hood, Line 27
She, to her chamber gone, a ditty fair Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 77
And a sad ditty of this story born Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 501
He play'd an ancient ditty , long since mute, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 291
 
DIVE..............6
To dive into the deepest. Dark, nor light, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 221
For as delicious wine doth, sparkling, dive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 511
To entice her to a dive ! then stealing in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 941
How they can dive in sight and unseen rise- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 342
Still let me dive into the joy I seek,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 690
When first for April honey into faint flowers they dive ." The Jealousies, Line 261
 
DIVED.............2
Has dived to its foundations, gulph'd it down, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 351
He dived - Not Aladdin magian, Line 57
 
DIVER.............2
For them the Ceylon diver held his breath, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 113
Like to a diver in the pearly seas, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 355
 
DIVERS............1
Of divers brilliances? 'tis the edifice Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 719
 
DIVERSE...........3
Of diverse moths, that aye their rest are quitting; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 112
Of diverse passion; when her lips and eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 468
Diverse , sheer opposite, antipodes. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 200
 
DIVERSELY.........1
Diversely ting'd with rose and amethyst, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 386
 
DIVES.............2
Who dives three fathoms where the waters run Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 639
That skims, or dives , or sleeps, 'twixt cape and cape. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 204
 
DIVIDED...........1
And terrors manifold divided me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 563
 
DIVINE............39
And splendidly mark'd with the story divine On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 7
To catch the tunings of a voice divine . Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 28
To the blue dwelling of divine Urania: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 41
What swell'd with pathos, and what right divine : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 55
Was warm'd luxuriously by divine Mozart; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 110
To search for thee, divine Endymion! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 192
For when men star'd at what was most divine To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 11
O forester divine ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 262
Anon they wander'd, by divine converse, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 371
Our ready minds to fellowship divine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 778
Of Cupids shun thee, too divine art thou, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 180
And, just beyond, on light tiptoe divine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 261
Of velvet leaves and bugle-blooms divine ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 414
The passion" - "O dov'd Ida the divine ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 761
Couched in thy brightness, dream of fields divine : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 58
No woods were green enough, no bower divine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 151
Of light, soft, unseen leaves of sounds divine . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 800
Apollo's garland:- yet didst thou divine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 12
To divine powers: from his hand full fain Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 409
Sipping beverage divine , Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 20
And divine liquids come with odorous ooze Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 411
More parching to the tongue than all, of more divine a smart, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 8
A thing of soft misnomers, so divine And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 3
Divine by loving, and so goes on And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 5
But divine melodious truth; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 19
She scarcely heard: her maiden eyes divine , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 57
For rest divine upon exalted couch Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 192
Distinct, and visible; symbols divine , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 316
Divine ye were created, and divine Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 329
Divine ye were created, and divine Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 329
Enshaded in forgetfulness divine : Sonnet to Sleep, Line 4
So perfect, so divine , that our poor eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 67
Or where God Bacchus drains his cups divine , Lamia, Part I, Line 209
Ran the dark veins, that none but feet divine Lamia, Part I, Line 385
Will make Elysian shades not too fair, too divine . Lamia, Part II, Line 212
For rest divine upon exalted couch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 36
Of love, your kiss, those hands, those eyes divine , I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 7
Unintellectual, yet divine to me;- What can I do to drive away, Line 14
Divine , I say!- What sea-bird o'er the sea What can I do to drive away, Line 15
 
DIVINELY..........1
Pry 'mong the stars, to strive to think divinely : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 8
 
DIVINER...........2
In what diviner moments of the day To G.A.W., Line 2
Any diviner eloquence,- woo her ears Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
 
DIVINEST..........2
It is thy voice - divinest ! Where?- who? who Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 623
Soft mitigated by divinest lids The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 266
 
DIVING............1
Of his swift magic. Diving swans appear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 339
 
DIVINITIES........1
Even to swooning, why ye, Divinities , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 152
 
DIVINITY..........7
Let his divinity o'er-flowing die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 143
By reason of his fallen divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 12
Many a fallen old Divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 8
Whose hand, whose essence, what divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 104
And by thy self, forlorn divinity , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 287
By reason of the fallen divinity The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 316
And griev'd I hearken'd. "That divinity The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 332
 
DIVISION..........1
A terrible division , God of the meridian, Line 6
 
DIVORCE...........1
Divorce him from your solitary thoughts, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 71
 
DIVORCEMENT.......1
Have sworn divorcement 'twixt me and my right. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 116
 
DIZZIER...........1
Imagination gave a dizzier pain. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1009
 
DIZZILY...........1
Walk'd dizzily away. Pained and hot Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 904
 
DIZZINESS.........1
To tell; 'tis dizziness to think of it. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 827
 
DIZZY.............5
Eternally around a dizzy void? Sleep and Poetry, Line 177
So do these wonders a most dizzy pain, On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 11
Until my head was dizzy and distraught. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 565
Am sailing with thee through the dizzy sky! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 187
On such a catering trust my dizzy head. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 177
 
DOATING...........2
At which soft ravishment, with doating cry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 715
Yawning and doating a whole summer long, And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 6
 
DOCK..............1
Large dock leaves, spiral foxgloves, or the glow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 49
 
DOCKYARD..........1
Fall'n beneath the dockyard strokes, Robin Hood, Line 44
 
DOCTOR............1
This learned doctor will agree with me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 29
 
DOCTRINE..........1
Your doctrine has not been so harsh to him Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 85
 
DODGE.............1
For solitary thinkings; such as dodge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 294
 
DOES..............29
Wherefore does any grief our joy impair? As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 14
Wherefore more proudly does the gentle knight Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 47
And always does my heart with pleasure dance, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 51
Of whitest clouds she does her beauty dress, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 60
What does he murmur with his latest breath, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 69
I leave them as a father does his son. Sleep and Poetry, Line 404
Not the minutest whisper does it send I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 66
So every tale, does this sweet tale of thine. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 208
Dear as the temple's self, so does the moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 28
"This river does not see the naked sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 540
As does the nightingale, upperched high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 828
The diamond path? And does it indeed end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 652
How he does love me! His poor temples beat Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 764
Utter a gorgon voice? Does yonder thrush Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 129
Why is this mortal here? Does thou not know Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 428
Came it? It does not seem my own, and I Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 476
There anguish does not sting; nor pleasure pall: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 526
Why does his lady smile, pleasing her eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 798
Fades as does its blossoming; Fancy, Line 12
Yes, sister, but it does regard you greatly, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 58
Hunted me as a Tartar does the boar, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 51
Aye, Satan, does that yerk ye? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 74c
Why does your tender palm dissolve in dew?"- Lamia, Part I, Line 370
A mighty soldier. Does he still hold out? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 34
As many a poor felon does not live to tell. The Jealousies, Line 180
" Does not your master give a rout to-night?" The Jealousies, Line 280
"Where does she live?" ask'd Hum. "Her fair locks curl The Jealousies, Line 385
I'll knock you-" " Does your Majesty mean - down? The Jealousies, Line 408
She does not mean it really. Cheer up, hearty - there! The Jealousies, Line 459
 
DOES'T............1
Does't end in this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 158b
 
DOFF..............2
From thy sea-foamy cradle; or to doff Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 699
Doff all sad fears, thou white deliciousness, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1000
 
DOFF'D............1
Sir Gondibert has doff'd his shining steel, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 138
 
DOG...............2
"Salpietro!" exclaim'd Hum, "is the dog there? The Jealousies, Line 311
Her Highness' pug- dog - got a sharp rebuff- The Jealousies, Line 699
 
DOG'S.............2
Not at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's hated screech, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 171
Nor at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's even screech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 20
 
DOGS..............1
Whose very dogs would execrations howl The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 87
 
DOING.............1
Death doing in a turban'd masquerade. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 5
 
DOINGS............1
And watch intently Nature's gentle doings : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 63
 
DOLEFUL...........1
Too many doleful stories do we see, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 93
 
DOLL..............1
And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 1
 
DOLOR.............1
Typhon, and Dolor , and Porphyrion, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 20
 
DOLOROUS..........2
And hither came, to see how dolorous fate Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 240
And dolorous accent from a tragic harp The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 444
 
DOLPHIN...........3
Haply, like dolphin tumults, when sweet shells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 610
Next, on a dolphin , clad in laurel boughs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1001
To visit dolphin -coral in deep seas. To Homer, Line 4
 
DOLPHIN'S.........1
Like silver streaks across a dolphin's fin, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 50
 
DOLPHINS..........3
Of dolphins bob their noses through the brine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 311
Dolphins were still my playmates; shapes unseen Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 343
Here by turns his dolphins all, Not Aladdin magian, Line 31
 
DOLT..............2
O, wretched dolt ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 196b
What is this? Auranthe, thou fool, dolt , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 100
 
DOLTS.............1
Of dolts to smooth, inlay, and clip, and fit, Sleep and Poetry, Line 197
 
DOMAIN............5
Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 1
Fell sick within the rose's just domain , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 34
Scorches and burns our once serene domain . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 63
Stay! though the greenest woods be thy domain , Lamia, Part I, Line 263
Scorches and burns our once serene domain . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 365
 
DOMAINS...........1
If my domains were emptied of these folk, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
 
DOME..............7
In this little dome , all those melodies strange, On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 33
From the blue dome , though I to dimness gaze To My Brother George (epistle), Line 5
Gold dome , and crystal wall, and turquois floor, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 595
A vaulted dome like heaven's, far bespread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 631
Of the dome pomp, reflected in extremes, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 886
Endymion to heaven's airy dome Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 38
To prop my empire's dome . Conrad, in thee Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 161
 
DOMED.............2
Some wider- domed high magnificence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 34
To that eternal domed monument. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 71
 
DOMES.............4
At every onward step proud domes arose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 836
Rich opal domes were seen, on high upheld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 841
Arches, and domes , and fiery galleries; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 180
Arches, and domes , and fiery galeries: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 28
 
DOMESTIC..........2
A domestic of Ben's. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line Keats's Note to Line 29
Another domestic of Ben's. Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Keats's Note to Line 53
 
DOMINAT...........1
And as for the Chancellor - dominat . The Gothic looks solemn, Line 12
 
DOMINEER..........1
The shady visions come to domineer , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 244
 
DOMINEERING.......1
The domineering potion; but in vain: The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 54
 
DOMING............1
Their doming curtains, high, magnificent, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 870
 
DOMINION..........2
In reverence vailed - my crystalline dominion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 793
Slants over blue dominion . Thy bright team Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 955
 
DOMINIONS.........3
Far from the narrow bounds of thy dominions . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 106
O, where are thy dominions ? Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 16
Into thy pale dominions ! Spirit here that reignest, Line 10
 
DON'T.............6
" Don't beat him!" return'd Hum, and on the floor came pat. The Jealousies, Line 315
And said: " Don't tell me what you want, Eban; The Jealousies, Line 317
"Ah, cursed Bellanaine!" " Don't think of her," The Jealousies, Line 433
"Pho! nonsense!" exclaim'd Hum, "now don't despair: The Jealousies, Line 458
It goes against your conscience - good! Well, don't . The Jealousies, Line 462
When the time comes, don't feel the least alarm; The Jealousies, Line 520
 
DONE..............45
The message certain to be done to-morrow- Sleep and Poetry, Line 323
These lines; and howsoever they be done , Sleep and Poetry, Line 403
In summer luxury,- he has never done On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 6
These things which happen. Rightly have they done : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 528
And now 'tis done to thee, Endymion. Hence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 439
Done heedlessly, those spouting columns rose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 606
The world has done its duty. Yet, oh yet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 728
Which done , and all these labours ripened, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 707
And having done it, took his dark blue cloak Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 751
And shouldst thou break it - What, is it done so clean? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 758
'Twas done : and straight with sudden swell and fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 766
And pray persuade with thee - Ah, I have done , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 920
How have I dwelt in fear of fate: 'tis done - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1023
A full accomplishment! The thing is done , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 18
A three days' journey in a moment done : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 253
As though they jests had been: nor had he done Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 947
And a blush for having done it; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 6
O what can be done ? Shall we stay or run? O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 19
She spoilt her half- done broidery with the same. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 16
But it is done - succeed the verse or fail- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 157
She had no knowledge when the day was done , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 421
All is cold beauty; pain is never done On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 8
Well done - now those lips and a flowery seat: Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 19
Anon his heart revives: her vespers done , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 226
And Bertha had not yet half done The Eve of St. Mark, Line 24
Than he prick'd up his ears and said, "Well done ; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 76
Well done - for by what Mr. Dwarfy said, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 81
O let him feel the evil he hath done ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 332
And the harvest's done . La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 8
Can smother from myself the wrong I've done him,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 156
'Twas done in memory of my boyish days, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 40
He hath wrong'd me, and I have done him wrong; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 58
It must be done as my bribed woman can Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 22
Cannot be done ; for see, this chamber-floor Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 45
Not done already a sheer judgment on thee? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 95
The sword has done its worst; not without worst Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 5
Done to another,- Conrad has it home! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 6
The day is not quite done . Go, bring them hither. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 116
That's not well done .- Where is she? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 186
So done , upon the nymph his eyes he bent Lamia, Part I, Line 134
Now, when the wine has done its rosy deed, Lamia, Part II, Line 209
this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece." Burton's "Anatomy of Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
"The sacrifice is done , but not the less The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 241
And audience had, and speeching done , they gain The Jealousies, Line 32
And wept as if he never would have done , The Jealousies, Line 445
 
DONE'T............1
Had done't already; that the dreadful smiles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 782
 
DONOR.............1
When some ethereal and high-favouring donor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 437


Published @ RC

March 2005