Doo-Dra - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
DOOM..............14
Down, down, uncertain to what pleasant doom , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 661
So witless of their doom , that verily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 492
And by old Rhadamanthus' tongue of doom , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 953
My soul is to its doom : I would not grieve Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 61
Lustre into the sun, and put cold doom Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 277
Happy and thoughtless of thy day of doom ! This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 4
I was a prince - a baby prince - my doom When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 30
No care had touch'd his cheek with mortal doom , Character of C.B., Line 8
Look up, and let me see our doom in it; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 97
Art thou, too, near such doom ? vague fear there is: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 327
The whole world chaff to me. Your doom is fixed. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 157
Thy doom ."- "High Prophetess," said I, "purge off The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 145
Listening in their doom for Saturn's voice. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 12
In silence, not insulting his sad doom King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 52
 
DOOM'D............2
Doom'd with enfeebled carcase to outstretch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 690
All lovers, whom fell storms have doom'd to die Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 722
 
DOOMED............1
Must surely be self- doomed or he will rue it: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 843
 
DOOMING...........2
A rough-voic'd war against the dooming stars. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 864
The rebel, but as a dooming judge to give King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 20
 
DOOMS.............1
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 20
 
DOOR..............37
Your sceptre worth a straw, your cushions old door mats." Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 8
Stands next door to Wilson the Hosier. The Gothic looks solemn, Line 6
Of a swallow's nest- door , could delay a trace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 753
For clamour, when the golden palace door Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 991
But 'hind the door , I love kissing more- Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 7
Before the door had given her to his eyes; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 18
Smile through an in- door lattice, all delight. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 200
That a door There was a naughty boy, Line 109
Open wide the mind's cage- door , Fancy, Line 7
Northward he turneth through a little door , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 19
And so it chanc'd, for many a door was wide, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 29
She clos'd the door , she panted, all akin The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 201
The hall door shuts again, and all the noise is gone. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 261
A chain-droop'd lamp was flickering by each door ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 357
The key turns, and the door upon its hinges groans. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 369
Burst the door open, quick - or I declare When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 16
And touch'd the wards; the door full courteously When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 71
Then, as was wont, his palace- door flew ope Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 205
And in- door melodies; nor the ruddy wine Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 49
Do you forget that even the senseless door -posts Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 30
[Goes to the door , listens, and opens it. Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 106
Look there to the door ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 158b
E'en to her chamber- door , and there, fair boy,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Stands with the door ajar to let him in? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 15
O that that door with hollow slam would close Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 16
Open the door ; let's hear if all is quiet. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 35
O, close the door ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Erminia, Line 40b
door in the Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Stout soldiers posted at the door ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 10a
Of some arch'd temple door , or dusky colonnade. Lamia, Part I, Line 361
A pillar'd porch, with lofty portal door , Lamia, Part I, Line 379
Above the lintel of their chamber door , Lamia, Part II, Line 14
Into the dwellings, through the door crannies, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 206
And with a slave-like silence closed the door , The Jealousies, Line 204
Until he knock'd at the magician's door ; The Jealousies, Line 275
"Next door but one to us, upon the right, The Jealousies, Line 282
And breathe themselves at th' Emperor's chamber door , The Jealousies, Line 323
 
DOORS.............18
And scarcely stays to ope the folding doors : Calidore: A Fragment, Line 70
Dread opener of the mysterious doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 288
And travelling my eye, until the doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 581
Waits at the doors of heaven. Thou art not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 959
The doors all look as if they oped themselves, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 49
And her house was out of doors . Old Meg she was a gipsey, Line 4
For Madeline. Beside the portal doors , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 76
At two or three doors Two or three posies, Line 10
The very porters, as I pass'd the doors , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 50
His eyes are fix'd still on the open doors , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 64
[The doors open. Enter Page. Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
We are all weary - faint - set ope the doors - Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 194
Waits with high marble doors for blood and incense rare. Lamia, Part I, Line 228
Of the wide doors disclos'd a place unknown Lamia, Part I, Line 388
About the halls, and to and from the doors , Lamia, Part II, Line 119
The old man through the inner doors broad-spread; Lamia, Part II, Line 170
Where even at the open doors awhile The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 466
At the open doors , with wide saluting eyes, The Jealousies, Line 758
 
DOORWAY...........1
Before its wreathed doorway , on a mound The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 28
 
DORIAN............1
In aid soft warble from the Dorian flute; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 12
 
DORIC.............1
The plain Doric column The Gothic looks solemn, Line 2
 
DORIS.............1
Of Doris , and the Egean seer, her spouse- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1000
 
DORMANT...........2
For that to love, so long, I've dormant lain: Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 8
Lay dormant , mov'd convuls'd and gradually Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 499
 
DOSE..............2
Take refuge.- Of bad lines a centaine dose Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 112
A dose of senna-tea, or nightmare Gorgon, The Jealousies, Line 341
 
DOST..............39
Oh Peace! and dost thou with thy presence bless On Peace, Line 1
Delightful: thou thy griefs dost dress To Lord Byron, Line 7
And through whole solemn hours dost sit, and hearken Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 238
That thou dost know of things mysterious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 506
Where dost thou listen to the wide halloos Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 307
'Tis in the breath of heaven: thou dost taste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 310
Freedom as none can taste it, nor dost waste Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 311
Dost thou now lave thy feet and ankles white? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 325
Dost thou now please thy thirst with berry-juice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 327
If in soft slumber thou dost hear my voice, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 329
What! dost thou move? dost kiss? O bliss! O pain! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 773
What! dost thou move? dost kiss? O bliss! O pain! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 773
O 'twas a cruel thing."- "Now thou dost taunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 975
Thou dost bless every where, with silver lip Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 56
Such utmost beauty? Alas, thou dost pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 74
For one whose cheek is pale: thou dost bewail Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 76
His tears, who weeps for thee. Where dost thou sigh? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 77
" Dost thou not mark a gleaming through the tide, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 718
As newly come of heaven, dost thou sit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 962
Dost weep for me? Then should I be content. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 119
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 147
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 153
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 159
Why dost borrow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 165
Its sweets in the wrong sense.- Thou dost eclipse Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 12
And grief unto my darling joys dost bring. Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 14
Art thou so fruitful? or dost thou beguile To the Nile, Line 6
Of all beyond itself: thou dost bedew To the Nile, Line 11
Green rushes like our rivers, and dost taste To the Nile, Line 12
And to the sea as happily dost haste. To the Nile, Line 14
Dost thou forget, sham Monarch of the Waves, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 319
When thou dost shed a tear: explain thy griefs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 70
Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 44
Nay, nay, without more words, dost know of him? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 67
Wife! Why dost linger on that syllable, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
"Lamia, what means this? Wherefore dost thou start? Lamia, Part II, Line 254
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep To Autumn, Line 19
Round to the curb-stone patient dost thou trudge, The Jealousies, Line 247
Quiet and plodding, thou dost bear no grudge The Jealousies, Line 250
 
DOT...............1
The gulphing whale was like a dot in the spell, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 205
 
DOTAGE............1
In trembling dotage to the feeblest fright Lamia, Part II, Line 283
 
DOTE..............3
Yet must I dote upon thee, - call thee sweet, Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 9
I watch and dote upon the silver lakes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 740
It is a thing I dote on: so I'd fain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 911
 
DOTES.............1
And dotes the more upon a heart at ease; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 4
 
DOTH..............92
O'ershading sorrow doth not make thee less To Lord Byron, Line 6
As when a cloud a golden moon doth veil, To Lord Byron, Line 9
Which the glad setting sun in gold doth dress; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 35
Nigh swooning, he doth purse his weary lips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 10
How "love doth know no fulness nor no bounds." Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 12
And while it doth last, Hither, hither, love, Line 19
"O thou, whose mighty palace roof doth hang Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 232
When he doth tighten up the golden reins, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 550
And how he died: and then, that love doth scathe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 733
And, from the turf, a lullaby doth pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 793
Doth her resign; and where her tender hands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 945
One sigh doth echo, one poor sob doth pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 6
One sigh doth echo, one poor sob doth pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 6
Doth more avail than these: the silver flow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 30
Pavilions him in bloom, and he doth see Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 56
Another city doth he set about, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 148
It seems an angry lightning, and doth hiss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 233
Who, when this planet's sphering time doth close, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 251
What misery most drowningly doth sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 281
By one consuming flame: it doth immerse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 369
The which she fills with visions, and doth dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 485
For as delicious wine doth , sparkling, dive Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 511
And so long absence from thee doth bereave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 775
As much as here is penn'd doth always find Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 847
More suddenly than doth a moment go, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1021
Of green or silvery bower doth enshrine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 73
Then, like a new fledg'd bird that first doth shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 388
For as Apollo each eve doth devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 463
How every soldier, with firm foot, doth hold Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 730
As doth a flower at Apollo's touch. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 786
Of Iris, when unfading it doth shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 851
Doth vault the waters, so the waters drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 869
At thy fear'd trident shrinking, doth unlock Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 947
Ah me, how I could love!- My soul doth melt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 71
As doth the voice of love: there's not a breath Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 82
In swells unmitigated, still doth last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 425
Good-bye to all but love! Then doth he spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 433
One hour doth linger weeping, for the pierce Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 518
For yet the past doth prison me. The rill, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 691
As feels a dreamer what doth most create Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 889
As doth a mother wild God of the meridian, Line 13
He doth his green way beguile Robin Hood, Line 28
But to thy cheek my soul doth take its flight: Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 8
And hearkening for a love-sound, doth devour Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 11
That when a man doth set himself in toil Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 3
That doth enfold and touch thee all about, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 5
Doth catch at the maiden's gown. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 18
You know the Enchanted Castle - it doth stand Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 26
You know it well enough, where it doth seem Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 33
An echo of sweet music doth create Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 62
A fear in the poor herdsman who doth bring Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 63
Fell thin as a young mother's, who doth seek Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 35
The little sweet doth kill much bitterness; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 98
Must see behind, as doth the hunted hare. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 144
Out of the amorous dark what day doth borrow. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 206
Gurgles through straiten'd banks, and still doth fan Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 211
Ah! when a soul doth thus its freedom win, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 219
How she doth whisper to that aged Dame, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 346
For here, in truth, it doth not well belong Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 390
Vaprous doth hide them; just so much I wist Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 4
I tread on them; that all my eye doth meet Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 12
While the night breeze doth softly let us know Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 33
And opposite the stedfast eye doth meet Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 51
That silly youth doth think to make itself And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 4
When the Night doth meet the Noon Fancy, Line 22
When the hen-bird's wing doth rest Fancy, Line 61
Where's the cheek that doth not fade, Fancy, Line 69
Doth not weary? Where's the face Fancy, Line 73
Where the nightingale doth sing Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 17
What doth strengthen and what maim. Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 34
No leaf doth tremble, no ripple is there Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 9
While Porphyro upon her face doth look, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 128
Made purple riot: then doth he propose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 138
Were never miss'd." - Thus plaining, doth she bring The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 158
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 279
Doth ease its heart of love in. - I am gone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 112
Of shapeless Chaos. Say, doth the dull soil Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 217
Doth fear to meet the sea: but sea it met, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 302
Ever gently drows'd doth keep Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 54
As doth eternity: Cold Pastoral! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 45
My ring! now, on my life, it doth rejoice Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 17
He doth this moment wish himself asleep Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 91
When in the morning he doth yawn with pride, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 14
It doth make me freeze. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 118b
Doth operate quietly when his breath is gone: Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 42
Even as the worm doth feed upon the nut, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 158
Where she doth breathe!" "Bright planet, thou hast said," Lamia, Part I, Line 87
Doth ease its heart of love in. Moan and wail. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 417
Which to the oil-trade doth great scaith and harm, The Jealousies, Line 215
"In Canterbury doth your lady shine? The Jealousies, Line 413
And sponge my forehead,- so my love doth make me pine." The Jealousies, Line 432
Where the Chief Justice on his knees and hands doth crawl. The Jealousies, Line 765
 
DOTING............1
Him all in all unto her doting self. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 460
 
DOUBLE............7
A bunch of violets full blown, and double , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 92
Double -lived in regions new? Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 4
Double -lived in regions new! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 40
With deeper crimson, and a double smart? Lamia, Part II, Line 51
Flush'd were their cheeks, and bright eyes double bright: Lamia, Part II, Line 214
And in the evening tak'st a double row The Jealousies, Line 241
With my new double -barrel - stew'd the thighs, The Jealousies, Line 650
 
DOUBLED...........2
Doubled into a common fist, went grand, The Jealousies, Line 350
Kept reconnoitring us - doubled our guard- The Jealousies, Line 681
 
DOUBLING..........1
And doubling over head their little fists Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 509
 
DOUBLY............5
And doubly sweet a brotherhood in song; To George Felton Mathew, Line 2
No, doubly no;- yet should these rhymings please, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 78
A sense of real things comes doubly strong, Sleep and Poetry, Line 157
With a queen's awful lips I doubly thank you! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 89
Who doubly loathes a father's tyranny; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 96
 
DOUBT.............13
That I am oft in doubt whether at all To George Felton Mathew, Line 20
Free from the smallest pebble-bead of doubt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 149
Fondling and kissing every doubt away; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 735
O that I could not doubt !" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 721a
And you will prize it, lady, I doubt not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 138
From our great Emperor; to you, I doubt not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 123
You have heard, my liege, and so, no doubt , all here, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 129
I cannot doubt - I will not - no - to doubt Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 193
I cannot doubt - I will not - no - to doubt Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 193
You cannot doubt but 'tis in Albert's power Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 6
No, I cannot doubt . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 7b
His drooping head, and clear his soul of doubt , Lamia, Part I, Line 305
The city of Balk- 'twas Balk beyond all doubt : The Jealousies, Line 679
 
DOUBTFUL..........2
That is a doubtful tale from faery land, Lamia, Part II, Line 5
She did so, but 'tis doubtful how and whence Lamia, Part II, Line 117
 
DOUBTINGS.........1
Against all doubtings , and will keep alive Sleep and Poetry, Line 160
 
DOUBTLESS.........1
These things are doubtless : yet in truth we've had Sleep and Poetry, Line 230
 
DOUBTS............1
Will blow one half of your sad doubts away. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 61
 
DOUCEUR...........1
Zodiac will not move without a sly douceur ! The Jealousies, Line 297
 
DOV'D.............1
The passion" - "O dov'd Ida the divine! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 761
 
DOVE..............27
As from the darkening gloom a silver dove As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 1
A dove -like bosom. In truth there is no freeing Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 36
Upholding wreaths of ivy; the white dove , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 43
And one will teach a tame dove how it best Sleep and Poetry, Line 111
Edg'd round with dark tree tops? through which a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 86
All through my bosom: thou art as a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 467
A Paphian dove upon a message sent? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 510
From a sick dove . At length, to break the pause, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 720
What could it be but love? How a ring- dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 731
Than be - I care not what. O meekest dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 169
I was as vague as solitary dove , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 805
Henceforth was dove -like.- Loth was he to move Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 870
Young dove of the waters! truly I'll not hurt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 582
Nor breath of sleeping dove , nor river's flow,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 972
Arise then! for the hen- dove shall not hatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1025
To Endymion's amaze: "By Cupid's dove , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 979
I had a dove , and the sweet dove died, I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 1
I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, I had a dove, and the sweet dove died, Line 1
She comes, she comes again, like ring- dove fray'd and fled. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 198
A dove forlorn and lost with sick unpruned wing." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 333
And made their dove -wings tremble. On he flared, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 217
Or shall the tree be envious of the dove Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 221
Each like a dove leaving its olive perch, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 286
But who wast thou, O happy, happy dove ? Ode to Psyche, Line 22
But you must taunt this dove , for she hath lost Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 125
The God, dove -footed, glided silently Lamia, Part I, Line 42
And made their dove -wings tremble: on he flared The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 61
 
DOVE'S............3
They will be found softer than ring- dove's cooings. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 64
Warm as a dove's nest among summer trees, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 666
Two or three dove's eggs Two or three posies, Line 27
 
DOVELIKE..........1
Dovelike in the dim cell lying beyond Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 65
 
DOVES.............11
Than wings of swans, than doves , than dim-seen eagle? Sleep and Poetry, Line 22
Are fluttering round the room like doves in pairs; Sleep and Poetry, Line 328
Pigeons and doves : Adonis something mutter'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 497
Soon were the white doves plain, with necks stretch'd out, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 523
The impatient doves , up rose the floating car, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 580
A toying with the doves . Then,- "Mighty crown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 897
Through the thick branches, poor ring- doves sleek forth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 327
Doves will offer up, and sweetest store Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 660
Ring- doves may fly convuls'd across to some high cedar'd lair; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 20
Call'd doves of Siam, Lima mice, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 79
Have bred forth, not pale solitary doves , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 225
 
DOWDIES...........1
Of dowdies , for some dance or party drest, The Jealousies, Line 242
 
DOWER.............3
What though I am not wealthy in the dower Sleep and Poetry, Line 284
The earth its dower of river, wood, and vale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 838
Among her kindred, wonder'd that such dower Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 454
 
DOWN..............102
Which, pure from mossy beds, did down distill, Imitation of Spenser, Line 5
When streams of light pour down the golden west, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 2
I see the lark down -dropping to his nest, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 135
For down they rush as though they would be free, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 13
And often, when I sit me down to rhyme, How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 5
Let me write down a line of glorious tone, On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 11
Melt my Dedalian wings, and drive me down Sleep and Poetry, Line 303
Sappho's meek head was there half smiling down Sleep and Poetry, Line 381
Fanning away the dandelion's down ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 96
Lo! who dares say, "Do this"?- Who dares call down To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 9
A trampling down of what the world most prizes, On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 11
Down -looking - aye, and with a chastened light On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 2
A lamb strayed far a- down those inmost glens, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 69
Branch down sweeping from a tall ash top, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 335
Down in the blue-bells, or a wren light rustling Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 451
Weigh down thy nature. Hast thou sinn'd in aught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 508
With my own steed from Araby; pluck down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 534
And paces leisurely down amber plains Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 551
And, sitting down close by, began to muse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 558
By a bright something, sailing down apace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 602
My stumblings down some monstrous precipice: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 703
To my down -sunken hours, and with thee, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 708
Down twenty little falls, through reeds and bramble, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 934
Of smothering fancies, patiently sat down ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 139
Down sidelong aisles, and into niches old. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 264
Till, weary, he sat down before the maw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 271
Down whose green back the short-liv'd foam, all hoar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 349
And down some swart abysm he had gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 376
Immortal tear-drops down the thunderer's beard; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 476
So from the arbour roof down swell'd an air Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 513
Down -looking, vacant, through a hazy wood, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 560
Down , down, uncertain to what pleasant doom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 661
Down, down , uncertain to what pleasant doom, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 661
Swift as a fathoming plummet down he fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 662
Endymion sat down , and 'gan to ponder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 886
Down from the ceiling's height, pouring a noise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 923
In amorous rillets down her shrinking form! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 945
O, not so idle: for down -glancing thence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 86
To some black cloud; thence down I'll madly sweep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 247
The penitent shower fell, as down he knelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 289
Has dived to its foundations, gulph'd it down , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 351
Down a precipitous path, as if impell'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 489
How a restoring chance came down to quell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 644
Kneel'd down beside it, and with tenderest force Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 779
Down marble steps; pouring as easily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 814
She kist the sea-nymph's cheek,- who sat her down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 896
Pull'd down fresh foliage and coverture Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 930
From his green prison, and here kneeling down Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 69
Like to a moving vintage down they came, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 200
Than shoots the slanted hail-storm, down he dropt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 333
Endymion heard not: down his steed him bore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 612
Will trespass down those cheeks. Companion fair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 870
Bows down his summer head below the west. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 930
Nay, look not down , nor lick thy dainty wrists- To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 9
Under the down -trodden pall Robin Hood, Line 4
Down beside the pasture Trent; Robin Hood, Line 30
To the sheep on the lea o' the down , For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 15
Rantipole Betty she ran down a hill, Over the hill and over the dale, Line 5
Come down , we pray thee, ere the hot sun count Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 187
A coming down by craggis grey Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 3
And as they trotted down the glen Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 13
He reads it on the mountain's height, where chance he may sit down There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 43
The great sea shall war it down , Not Aladdin magian, Line 53
With down from Leda's cygnet progeny: Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 66
Acorns ripe down -pattering, Fancy, Line 65
Slipt its golden clasp, and down Fancy, Line 86
She turn'd, and down the aged gossip led The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 195
As down she knelt for heaven's grace and boon; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 219
Down the wide stairs a darkling way they found.- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 355
Down she sat, poor cheated soul, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 69
And then the thievish monkies down would creep When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 90
There must be Gods thrown down , and trumpets blown Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 127
Look'd down on him with pity, and the voice Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 306
Ere half this region-whisper had come down , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 349
And sat me down , and took a mouthed shell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 270
Went trickling down the golden bow he held. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 43
No hungry generations tread thee down ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 62
Could thy pleas'd star point down upon from heaven Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 8
And hurl'd me down the illimitable gulph Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 5
Down , down, proud temper! down, Auranthe's pride! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 74
Down, down , proud temper! down, Auranthe's pride! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 74
Down, down, proud temper! down , Auranthe's pride! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 74
Kiss down his eyelids! Was he not thy love? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
Down through tress-lifting waves the Nereids fair Lamia, Part I, Line 207
Had Lycius liv'd to hand his story down , Lamia, Part II, Line 7
And down the passage cast a glow upon the floor. Lamia, Part II, Line 15
All down the aisled place; and beneath all Lamia, Part II, Line 130
The cloudy swoon came on, and down I sunk The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 55
Throw down those imps and give me victory. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 431
He flies, for the Welch beagles to hunt down . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 18
From the throng'd towers of Lincoln hath look'd down , King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 21
Who sets down ev'ry sovereign as a zany,- The Jealousies, Line 161
Coming down stairs,- by St. Bartholomew! The Jealousies, Line 301
"He always comes down backward, with one shoe"- The Jealousies, Line 304
And knock'd down three cut glasses, and his best ink-stand. The Jealousies, Line 351
Drink up your brandy, and sit down by me, The Jealousies, Line 399
I'll knock you-" "Does your Majesty mean - down ? The Jealousies, Line 408
He turned it quickly, nimbly upside down , The Jealousies, Line 420
"Five minutes before one - brought down a moth The Jealousies, Line 649
All down the steps; and, as we enter'd, lo! The Jealousies, Line 754
Of moth's down , to make soft the royal beds, The Jealousies, Line 767
Down stairs on Crafticanto's evidence; The Jealousies, Line 789
 
DOWNCAST..........2
The downcast eye, repentant of the pain Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 4
His eye not downcast , and his folded arm, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 90
 
DOWNIEST..........1
To summon all the downiest clouds together Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 364
 
DOWNS.............1
Or from your swelling downs , where sweet air stirs Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 201
 
DOWNWARD..........10
Downward too flows many a tress Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 19
Nymph of the downward smile, and sidelong glance, To G.A.W., Line 1
Wheel downward come they into fresher skies, Sleep and Poetry, Line 131
Still downward with capacious whirl they glide; Sleep and Poetry, Line 133
Watch her half-smiling lips, and downward look; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 102
From such high soaring by a downward glance: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 584
And, downward , suddenly began to dip, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 87
Queen Venus leaning downward open arm'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 526
I caught a finger: but the downward weight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 673
Sink downward to his dusky cave again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 384
 
DOWNWARDS.........1
Backwards and downwards from his own two pair: The Jealousies, Line 310
 
DOWNY.............3
Nor to such downy rest can he allure them; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 12
Fair Isabella in her downy nest? Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 138
Your mournful Psyche, nor the downy owl Ode on Melancholy, Line 7
 
DOWRY.............1
Rich dowry from the spirit of the spheres,- Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 18
 
DOZED.............1
In silken tents, and 'mid light fragrance dozed , The Jealousies, Line 692
 
DOZEN.............1
Because some dozen vassals cry'd - my lord! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 78
 
DOZES.............1
O'er which the mind may hover till it dozes ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 108
 
DRAG..............1
Youngster! Page! go bid them drag her to me! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 178
 
DRAGG'D...........2
The world is all agape to see dragg'd forth Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 68
I would not see thee dragg'd to death by the hair, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
 
DRAGON............3
The dragon -world of all its hundred eyes; As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 5
A she devil! A dragon ! I her imp! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 63
More than a fiery dragon , and did burn Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 135
 
DRAGON'S..........2
Silencer of dragon's yell. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 64
Fire them and ram them in the dragon's nest; Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 59
 
DRAGONS...........3
A cave of young earth dragons - well, my boy, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 55
Then will the dragons fry and fizz their best, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 60
For there were sleeping dragons all around, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 353
 
DRAIN.............1
A conjurer's spirits, what cup will you drain ? The Jealousies, Line 359
 
DRAIN'D...........1
Hale strength, nor from my bones all marrow drain'd . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 614
 
DRAINLESS.........1
Disturbing the grand sea. A drainless shower Sleep and Poetry, Line 235
 
DRAINS............2
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 3
Or where God Bacchus drains his cups divine, Lamia, Part I, Line 209
 
DRAM..............1
Who let me taste that more than cordial dram , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 64
 
DRAMA'S...........1
To raise a trophy to the drama's muses. To George Felton Mathew, Line 7
 
DRAMATIS..........1
Dramatis Personae King Stephen
 
DRANK.............5
Each gazer drank ; and deeper drank more near: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 844
Each gazer drank; and deeper drank more near: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 844
Or nantz, or cherry brandy, drank full meek Character of C.B., Line 22
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank , and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Drank . That full draught is parent of my theme. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 46
 
DRAPERIES.........4
The draperies are so as though they had Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 49
These draperies are fine, and, being a mortal, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 31
The space, the splendour of the draperies , Lamia, Part II, Line 206
Store of strange vessels, and large draperies , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 73
 
DRAUGHT...........4
But I want as deep a draught Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 7
Still fed by melting ice, he takes a draught - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 535
O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been Ode to a Nightingale, Line 11
Drank. That full draught is parent of my theme. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 46
 
DRAUGHTS..........3
To take in draughts of life from the gold fount Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 656
My greedy thirst with nectarous camel- draughts ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 479
A blush of coral. Copious wonder- draughts Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 843
 
DRAVE.............1
Battle to the swollen billow-ridge, and drave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 612
 
DRAW..............7
And draw a soft endearing smile, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 23
Or by mysterious enticement draw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 268
And keep me as a chosen food to draw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 264
Yet lingeringly did the sad Ape forth draw When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 67
Draw not the sword; 'twould make an uproar, Duke, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 169
Draw ! but remember thou must cower thy plumes, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 109
Said gentle Hum; "the nights draw in apace; The Jealousies, Line 479
 
DRAWLING..........1
By drawling out - "Ye are that head of gold!" Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 14
 
DRAWN.............3
With deep- drawn sighs was quieting, he went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 255
Drawn off his nobles to revolt,- and shown Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 39
Whom with his sword swift- drawn and nimbly held, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 46
 
DRAWS.............4
Yea, or my veined pebble-floor, that draws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 112
Draws near when I must make a winding up Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 130
[ Draws a dagger. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 179b
Across the teaboard draws a long wet mark. Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 13


Published @ RC

March 2005