Dre-Dz - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
DREAD.............9
Ere the dread thunderbolt could reach? How! Sleep and Poetry, Line 274
Arcadian Pan, with such a fearful dread . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 158
Dread opener of the mysterious doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 288
When a dread waterspout had rear'd aloft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 346
My fever'd parchings up, my scathing dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 636
Wide pinions to keep here; nor do I dread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 356
And hoping heaven's dread wrath to shun, O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 77
Was acting, that could give so dread a stress The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 279
In stouter hearts than nurse's fear and dread : The Jealousies, Line 68
 
DREADED...........1
Now our dreaded Queen- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 19b
 
DREADFUL..........8
Some other gloominess, more dreadful cares, Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 3
How sickening, how dark the dreadful leisure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 910
Into my bosom, that the dreadful might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 173
A vivid lightning from that dreadful bow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 584
Had done't already; that the dreadful smiles Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 782
When dreadful guests would come to spoil her solitude. Lamia, Part II, Line 145
Of all the Gods, whose dreadful images Lamia, Part II, Line 279
To such a dreadful blaze, her side would scorch her hand. The Jealousies, Line 117
 
DREAM.............65
Nor minds he the white swans that dream so sweetly: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 62
Fit for the silv'ring of a seraph's dream ; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 38
Still time is fleeting, and no dream arises On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 9
O horrid dream - see how his body dips On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 12
Nebuchadnezzar had an ugly dream , Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 2
Yet it was but a dream : yet such a dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 574
Yet it was but a dream: yet such a dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 574
Dream within dream!" - "She took an airy range, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 633
Dream within dream !" - "She took an airy range, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 633
"Why did I dream that sleep o'er-power'd me Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 672
Reflects upon a diamond, my sweet dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 677
For nothing but a dream ?" Hereat the youth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 760
A hope beyond the shadow of a dream . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 857
With power to dream deliciously; so wound Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 708
And then the forest told it in a dream Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 832
Pass'd like a dream before him. Then the spur Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 894
His dream away? What melodies are these? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 933
Couched in thy brightness, dream of fields divine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 58
If thou art ripe to taste a long love dream ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 440
And take a dream 'mong rushes Stygian, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 505
Then Scylla, blushing sweetly from her dream , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 809
That he can even dream upon it thus!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 88
There came a dream , shewing how a young man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 376
Beheld awake his very dream : the gods Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 436
Or felt but a great dream ! O I have been Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 638
Adieu, my daintiest Dream ! although so vast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 656
By which he took his first soft poppy dream ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 786
Let me not wander in a barren dream : On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 12
A mossy place, a Merlin's hall, a dream . Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 34
But to each other dream , and nightly weep. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 8
While she the inmost of the dream would try. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 342
Though beautiful, cold - strange - as in a dream On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 3
Where thou didst dream alone on budded bays, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 3
Ever such a dream could see; Not Aladdin magian, Line 4
I've had a damn'd confounded ugly dream , Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 26
The shut rose shall dream of our loves and awake Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 21
Sweet lady, let her pray, and sleep, and dream The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 141
Sank in her pillow. Shaded was her dream The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 281
The blisses of her dream so pure and deep: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 301
Into her dream he melted, as the rose The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 320
"This is no dream , my bride, my Madeline!" The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 326
"No dream , alas! alas! and woe is mine! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 328
Dream , and so dream all night without a stir, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 75
Dream, and so dream all night without a stir, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 75
The latest dream I ever dream'd La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 35
Was it a vision, or a waking dream ? Ode to a Nightingale, Line 79
You puzzle me,- you haunt me,- when I dream Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 203
Almost a dream ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 220a
A foolish dream that from my brow hath wrung Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 221
I had a splendid dream of thee last night: Lamia, Part I, Line 69
It was no dream ; or say a dream it was, Lamia, Part I, Line 126
It was no dream; or say a dream it was, Lamia, Part I, Line 126
Their pleasures in a long immortal dream . Lamia, Part I, Line 128
And dream , when in the serpent prison-house, Lamia, Part I, Line 203
Her dream , with feast and rioting to blend; Lamia, Part I, Line 214
As men talk in a dream , so Corinth all, Lamia, Part I, Line 350
"Begone, foul dream !" he cried, gazing again Lamia, Part II, Line 271
But bare of laurel they live, dream , and die; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 7
Whether the dream now purposed to rehearse The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 16
Dream , and so dream all night, without a noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 374
Dream, and so dream all night, without a noise, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 374
Onward from the antichamber of this dream , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 465
To dream of thee! What can I do to drive away, Line 57
Let me begin my dream . To Fanny, Line 6
The Princess fell asleep, and, in her dream , The Jealousies, Line 710
 
DREAM'D...........5
To common lookers on, like one who dream'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 176
Or I have dream'd ."- "Yes," said the supreme shape, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 61
"Thou hast dream'd of me; and awaking up Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 62
And there I dream'd - Ah! woe betide! La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 34
The latest dream I ever dream'd La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 35
 
DREAM'ST..........1
Pillow'd in lovely idleness, nor dream'st Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 467
 
DREAMED...........1
I dreamed long ago. Now new begun, On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 4
 
DREAMER...........5
As feels a dreamer what doth most create Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 889
"My Madeline! sweet dreamer ! lovely bride! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 334
Only the dreamer venoms all his days, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 175
Pendent.- "Art thou not of the dreamer tribe? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 198
The poet and the dreamer are distinct, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 199
 
DREAMERS..........2
Was struck, and all were dreamers . At the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 900
Rejoin'd that voice - "They are no dreamers weak, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 162
 
DREAMING..........10
Was pass'd in dreaming . Hearken, sweet Peona! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 861
O let me then by some sweet dreaming flee Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 703
We'll talk about - no more of dreaming .- Now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 669
To shew this castle in fair dreaming wise Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 31
Of pale-mouth'd prophet dreaming . Ode to Psyche, Line 35
Of pale-mouth'd prophet dreaming . Ode to Psyche, Line 49
And link'd to a dreaming fancy. What do we here? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, First Knight, Line 4
And once, while among mortals dreaming thus, Lamia, Part I, Line 215
To the great world? Thou art a dreaming thing; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 168
So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 4
 
DREAMINGLY........1
Fearing to move or speak, she look'd so dreamingly . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 306
 
DREAMINGS.........1
O that our dreamings all of sleep or wake Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 67
 
DREAMLESS.........1
Their lids shut longest in a dreamless sleep. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 542
 
DREAMS............23
When no fair dreams before my "mind's eye" flit, To Hope, Line 3
Closer of lovely eyes to lovely dreams , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 120
Full of sweet dreams , and health, and quiet breathing. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 5
Of happy changes in emphatic dreams , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 414
Of that fine element that visions, dreams , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 748
Must dreams themselves be; seeing they're more slight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 755
Through buried paths, where sleepy twilight dreams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 73
They stood in dreams Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 887b
The mournful wanderer dreams . Behold! he walks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 407
And every night in dreams they groan'd aloud, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 263
Thee heave to airy sleep from fathom dreams - To Ailsa Rock, Line 6
She sigh'd for Agnes' dreams , the sweetest of the year. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 63
Pensive awhile she dreams awake, and sees, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 232
To this result: "O dreams of day and night! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 227
My sleep had been embroider'd with dim dreams ; Ode on Indolence, Line 42
Self-influenced; then, in his morning dreams Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 107
Real are the dreams of Gods, and smoothly pass Lamia, Part I, Line 127
The ghost of folly haunting my sweet dreams ." Lamia, Part I, Line 377
Fanatics have their dreams , wherewith they weave The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 1
For Poesy alone can tell her dreams , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 8
"Thou art no poet; may'st not tell thy dreams "? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 12
In Council, dreams too much among his books. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 32
"He dreams ," said Hum, "or I have ever lied, The Jealousies, Line 327
 
DREAMT............4
That night the Baron dreamt of many a woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 372
Surely I dreamt to-day, or did I see Ode to Psyche, Line 5
I dreamt I saw thee, robed in purple flakes, Lamia, Part I, Line 76
They dreamt of sin, and he sinn'd while they slept; The Jealousies, Line 16
 
DREAMY............1
In masque-like figures on the dreamy urn; Ode on Indolence, Line 56
 
DREAR.............15
Alone preserved me from the drear abyss Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 904
In chafing restlessness, is yet more drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 39
And birds from coverts innermost and drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 470
To stray away into these forests drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 270
Her lucid bow, continuing thus: " Drear , drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 988
Her lucid bow, continuing thus: "Drear, drear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 988
In drear nighted December, In drear nighted December, Line 1
In drear nighted December, In drear nighted December, Line 9
Jesting, deep in forest drear . Robin Hood, Line 18
But their low voices are not heard, though come on travels drear ; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 16
How chang'd thou art! how pallid, chill, and drear ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 311
For as among us mortals omens drear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 169
But for the main, here found they covert drear . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 32
Her eyes in torture fix'd, and anguish drear , Lamia, Part I, Line 150
Close to her passing, in indifference drear , Lamia, Part I, Line 238
 
DREARIEST.........1
Of health by due; where silence dreariest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 539
 
DREARILY..........3
Or of the dead leaves rustling drearily , Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 6
And wither drearily on barren moors: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 287
About the crisped oaks full drearily , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 295
 
DREARIMENT........1
Rested amid the desert's dreariment , The Jealousies, Line 394
 
DREARY............14
Full many a dreary hour have I past, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 1
For a long dreary season, comes a day After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 2
Sinking bewilder'd mid the dreary sea: On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 8
The dreary melody of bedded reeds- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 239
A heavenly beacon in their dreary woe. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 354
A dreary morning once I fled away Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 556
Working within him into something dreary ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 634
These dreary caverns for the open sky. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 987
Had been my dreary death? Fool! I began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 374
Time's creeping shall the dreary space fulfil: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 706
Until the poplar tops, in journey dreary , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 923
A dreary night of love and misery, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 50
"And all for nothing such a dreary ride, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 10
Suck'd to my grave amid a dreary calm! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 27
 
DRENCH............2
Blue tides may sluice and drench their time in caves and weedy There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 18
From wholesome drench of April rains, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 5
 
DRENCH'D..........2
She drench'd away:- and still she comb'd, and kept Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 407
Drench'd about the sombre rocks; Not Aladdin magian, Line 15
 
DRESS.............13
Delightful: thou thy griefs dost dress To Lord Byron, Line 7
Which the glad setting sun in gold doth dress ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 35
Of whitest clouds she does her beauty dress , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 60
Of lovely Laura in her light green dress , Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 13
Or a green hill o'erspread with chequered dress Sleep and Poetry, Line 77
There let its trumpet blow, and quickly dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 60
Who lov'st to see the hamadryads dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 236
The which she fills with visions, and doth dress Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 485
With belt, and spur, and bracing huntsman's dress . Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 192
Porphyro gazed upon her empty dress , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 245
A rosy sanctuary will I dress Ode to Psyche, Line 59
She set herself, high-thoughted, how to dress Lamia, Part II, Line 115
About the fragrant plaitings of thy dress , The Jealousies, Line 170
 
DRESS'D...........2
And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 1
The plain- dress'd sage and spangled blackamoor, The Jealousies, Line 321
 
DREST.............9
They be of what is worthy, - though not drest Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 21
A fragrant wild, with Nature's beauty drest , Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 7
Which at this moment is in sunbeams drest : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 140
Drest as though bold Robin Hood Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 10
Cleopatra, regal drest , Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Line 16
She seem'd a splendid angel, newly drest , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 223
And all her silken flanks with garlands drest ? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 34
Teeming with odours. Lamia, regal drest , Lamia, Part II, Line 133
Of dowdies, for some dance or party drest , The Jealousies, Line 242
 
DREW..............10
His present being: so he gently drew Calidore: A Fragment, Line 101
To Jove's high throne, and by her plainings drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 475
Strange matters did it treat of, and drew on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 679
Doth vault the waters, so the waters drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 869
The ooze-born Goddess beckoned and drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 893
When yet a child, I heard that kisses drew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 738
Of basil-tufts in Florence; for it drew Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 428
While, like held breath, the stars drew in their panting fires. Lamia, Part I, Line 300
Bertha or Bellanaine." So saying, he drew The Jealousies, Line 438
"Zooks!" exclaim'd Hum, as up the sash he drew , The Jealousies, Line 542
 
DRIED.............3
Dried carefully on the cooler side of sheaves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 439
I oft have dried my tears when thou hast smil'd. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 144
Whose springs of life are all dried up and dead, The Jealousies, Line 228
 
DRIES.............1
And put it in her bosom, where it dries Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 372
 
DRIFTING..........3
And sullenly drifting : yet my higher hope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 774
Left me dead- drifting to that fatal power. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 417
Upon a calm sea drifting : and meanwhile Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 406
 
DRIFTINGS.........1
To take the rich-ored driftings of the flood. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 112
 
DRIFTS............1
That drifts unfeather'd when bleak northerns blow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 750
 
DRINK.............12
An endless fountain of immortal drink , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 23
Have tippled drink more fine Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 5
And I drink at my eye, Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 8
We will drink our fill Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 13
The flower must drink the nature of the soil Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 11
If looks speak love-laws, I will drink her tears, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 39
That I might drink , and leave the world unseen, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 19
Serv'd with harsh food, with scum for Sunday- drink . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 89
Yet could my eyes drink up intenser beams Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 42
Alone they can drink up the morning rain: Lamia, Part I, Line 264
he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no Lamia, Keats's Footnote from Burton,
Drink up your brandy, and sit down by me, The Jealousies, Line 399
 
DRINKING..........2
Now while the earth was drinking it, and while Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 227
With the third part - (yet that is drinking dear!)- The Jealousies, Line 368
 
DRINKS............2
And tantalizes long; at last he drinks , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 417
Off Glocester's golden dishes - drinks pure wine, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 28
 
DRIP..............1
Like rose-leaves with the drip of summer rains. After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 8
 
DRIPPING..........4
To him her dripping hand she softly kist, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 101
Parted its dripping leaves with eager care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 678
And the great Sea-King bow'd his dripping head. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 890
With tears, as chilly as a dripping well, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 406
 
DRIVE.............7
And frown, to drive fair Cheerfulness away, To Hope, Line 10
Melt my Dedalian wings, and drive me down Sleep and Poetry, Line 303
Yea, by that law, another race may drive Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 230
What can I do to drive away What can I do to drive away, Line 1
Therefore he call'd a coach, and bade it drive amain. The Jealousies, Line 225
Seeing his servant can no further drive The Jealousies, Line 258
That shall drive Bertha to a fainting fit! The Jealousies, Line 519
 
DRIVEN............2
Who, driven forth from their religious cells, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 193
Driven me to the very edge o' the world, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 52
 
DRIVER............1
The driver of those steeds is forward bent, Sleep and Poetry, Line 152
 
DRIZZLING.........1
Spun off a drizzling dew,- which falling chill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 520
 
DRONE.............2
Charmed to death by the drone of the humming may fly. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 12
Like any drone shut from the fair bee-queen, The Jealousies, Line 132
 
DROOP.............5
But still would seem to droop , to pine, to love. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 176
For I no more shall wither, droop , and pine. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 254
Of happiness! ye on the stubble droop , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 273
Red whortle-berries droop above my head, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 298
That fosters the droop -headed flowers all, Ode on Melancholy, Line 13
 
DROOP'D...........1
A chain- droop'd lamp was flickering by each door; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 357
 
DROOPING..........17
'Tis morn, and the flowers with dew are yet drooping , To Some Ladies, Line 13
Where the dark-leav'd laburnum's drooping clusters To George Felton Mathew, Line 41
With its own drooping buds, but very white; To George Felton Mathew, Line 44
Hung from his shoulder like the drooping flowers Calidore: A Fragment, Line 95
On one side is a field of drooping oats, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 127
Drooping its beauty o'er the watery clearness, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 173
Not oat-sheaves drooping in the western sun; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 610
Hung a lush screen of drooping weeds, and spread Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 940
Nor any drooping flower Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 170
Why she sat drooping by the basil green, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 458
Leaned forward, with bright drooping hair, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 71
His drooping head, and clear his soul of doubt, Lamia, Part I, Line 305
I saw an arbour with a drooping roof The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 25
What tribe?"- The tall shade veil'd in drooping white The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 194
Mov'd the thin linen folds that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 196
Then the tall shade in drooping linens veil'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 216
Stirr'd the thin folds of gauze that drooping hung The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 218
 
DROOPINGLY........1
Pull droopingly , in slanting curve aside, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 4
 
DROOPS............1
Sad Zephyr droops the clouds like weeping willow: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 369
 
DROP..............14
Pure as the ice- drop that froze on the mountain? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 2
We well might drop a tear for him, and Burns. To George Felton Mathew, Line 71
And drop like hours into eternity. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 14
A fragile dew- drop on its perilous way Sleep and Poetry, Line 86
Sometimes goldfinches one by one will drop I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 87
Shed one drop then - it is gone- Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 7
He seem'd to taste a drop of manna-dew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 766
There hangs by unseen film, an orbed drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 806
Or drop a seed, till thou wast wide awake; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 154
Until exhausted of the latest drop , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 435
Of earth's splenetic fire, dully drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 399
Will drop their scarlet berry cups of dew? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 674
Leaving no drop in the bewildering cup, Lamia, Part I, Line 252
Of the least drop of creme de citron crystal clear." The Jealousies, Line 369
 
DROPP'D...........1
" Dropp'd my gold watch, and kill'd a kettle-drum- The Jealousies, Line 694
 
DROPPING..........5
Aye dropping their hard fruit upon the ground. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 41
Full often dropping a delicious tear, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 13
I see the lark down- dropping to his nest, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 135
Dew- dropping melody, in the Carian's ear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 373
Like pearl beads dropping sudden from their string: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 284
 
DROPS.............11
Some diamond water drops , and them to treasure To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 9
And oftentimes he feels the dewy drops This pleasant tale is like a little copse, Line 5
To alleys where the fir-tree drops its cone, On The Story of Rimini, Line 13
As do those brighter drops that twinkling stray Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 471
Shut her pure sorrow drops with glad exclaim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 490
Dew- drops , and dewy buds, and leaves, and flowers, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 900
Immortal tear- drops down the thunderer's beard; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 476
I sue not for my ruddy drops of life, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 546
Behold!"- Two copious tear- drops instant fell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 900
High as the eagles. Like two drops of dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 348
As crying cup biddy to drops of rain. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 66
 
DROPT.............3
And dropt my vision to the horizon's verge; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 590
Than shoots the slanted hail-storm, down he dropt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 333
Dropt hawkwise to the earth. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 512a
 
DROSS.............1
As earthly fires from dull dross can be cleans'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 41
 
DROUTH............2
For these I know thou canst not feel a drouth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 395
And cooling the drouth For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 10
 
DROUTHY...........1
Will thirst in drouthy ringlets there; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 57
 
DROVE.............1
Drove Nymph and Satyr from the prosperous woods, Lamia, Part I, Line 2
 
DROWN.............5
And let me in it drown my soul: Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 2
Drown both, and press them both against earth's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 145
That did both drown and keep alive my ears. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 277
And drown the wakeful anguish of the soul. Ode on Melancholy, Line 10
Imperial Elfinan, go hang thyself or drown ! The Jealousies, Line 144
 
DROWN'D...........4
And all his love for gentle Lycid drown'd ; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 12
Deeper and deeper sinking, until drown'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 963
Drown'd wast thou till an earthquake made thee steep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 13
Drown'd all in Rhenish and the sleepy mead: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 349
 
DROWNING..........1
Of a man drowning on his hateful throat. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 272
 
DROWNINGLY........1
What misery most drowningly doth sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 281
 
DROWNS............1
Up heaping through the slab: refreshment drowns Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 343
 
DROWS'D...........3
Ever gently drows'd doth keep Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, ZEPHYR, Line 54
To nations drows'd in peace! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 164a
Drows'd with the fume of poppies, while thy hook To Autumn, Line 17
 
DROWSE............1
Or I shall drowse beside thee, so my soul doth ache." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 279
 
DROWSILY..........3
Went drowsily under, God of the golden bow, Line 18
Uplifted drowsily , and nervy tails Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 646
For shade to shade will come too drowsily , Ode on Melancholy, Line 9
 
DROWSINESS........2
And seems to one in drowsiness half lost, On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 13
Medicined death to a lengthened drowsiness : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 484
 
DROWSY............9
Beneath thy drowsy wing a triple hour, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 462
And she had died in drowsy ignorance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 265
It was a vision.- In the drowsy gloom, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 273
O for some drowsy Morphean amulet! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 257
To music of the drowsy chimes. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 66
My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 1
My idle days? Ripe was the drowsy hour; Ode on Indolence, Line 15
At least for me,- so sweet as drowsy noons, Ode on Indolence, Line 36
Let not her steeds with drowsy -footed pace Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 33
 
DRUG..............1
But put therein some drug design'd Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 3
 
DRUID.............3
Where oaks, that erst the Druid knew, are growing, To George Felton Mathew, Line 39
His Druid locks to shake and ooze with sweat, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 137
Of Druid stones, upon a forlorn moor, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 35
 
DRUID'S...........1
As in a palsied Druid's harp unstrung; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 286
 
DRUIDS............2
Before the first of Druids was a child;- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 7
There is a pleasure on the heath where Druids old have been, There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 3
 
DRUM..............2
The kettle- drum , and far-heard clarionet, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 259
"Dropp'd my gold watch, and kill'd a kettle- drum - The Jealousies, Line 694
 
DRUMMER'S.........1
Than any drummer's in the muster-roll; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 268
 
DRUMS.............1
Of trumpets, shoutings, and belabour'd drums , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 17
 
DRUNK.............6
When butts of wine are drunk off to the lees? Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 36
Of the empyrean I have drunk my fill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 857
It came like a fierce potion, drunk by chance, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 267
Or bright elixir peerless I had drunk , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 119
My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 2
And soon his eyes had drunk her beauty up, Lamia, Part I, Line 251
 
DRUNKEN...........3
Drunken from pleasure's nipple; and his love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 869
Grew drunken , and would have its head and bent. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 797
Fancy is dead and drunken at its goal; This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 8
 
DRY...............13
Among the bushes half leafless, and dry ; Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 2
Dry up the moisture from your golden lids, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 49
Yet dry them up, in bidding hence all fears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 475
And golden keel'd, is left unlaunch'd and dry . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 21
Alas, he finds them dry ; and then he foams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 151
O think how this dry palate would rejoice! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 328
With dry cheek who can tell? While thus my might Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 616
Lifted dry above the main, Not Aladdin magian, Line 17
Dry your eyes - O dry your eyes! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 5
Dry your eyes - O dry your eyes! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 5
Almost before the recent ink is dry , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 266
That thou would wish thine own heart dry of blood, This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 5
Dry up your tears, and do not look so blue; The Jealousies, Line 51
 
DRYAD.............2
That thou, light-winged Dryad of the trees, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 7
Would fright a Dryad ; whose harsh herbaged meads What can I do to drive away, Line 40
 
DRYADES...........1
To catch a glimpse of Fauns, and Dryades I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 153
 
DRYADS............2
The moss-lain Dryads shall be lull'd to sleep; Ode to Psyche, Line 57
Frighted away the Dryads and the Fauns Lamia, Part I, Line 5
 
DRYOPE............1
Great son of Dryope , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 290
 
DRYOPE'S..........1
Than Dryope's lone lulling of her child; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 495
 
DUCAL.............1
And of my ducal palace not one stone Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 8
 
DUCATS............1
And pannier'd mules for ducats and old lies- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 134
 
DUCHESSES.........1
By duchesses and pearled margravines! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 90
 
DUDGEON...........1
Whilst I in dudgeon sing. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 4
 
DUE...............12
That I will follow with due reverence, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 63
Due reverence to your most sovereign eyes. To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 14
Of shepherds, lifting in due time aloud Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 162
Hold sphery sessions for a season due . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 33
Of health by due ; where silence dreariest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 539
Cast wan upon it! Burns! with honour due On Visiting the Tomb of Burns, Line 12
Come to pay devotion due - Not Aladdin magian, Line 33
If ceremonies due they did aright; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 50
Before the dawn in season due should blush, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 265
Conrad, with all due ceremony, give Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 154
Due adoration, thus began to adore; Lamia, Part I, Line 255
(Who wish to give the devil her due ) declare The Jealousies, Line 745
 
DUET..............1
Woos him to hold a duet in a smile, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 44
 
DUKE..............17
CONRAD, Duke of Franconia Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 3
To you, great Duke - Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 140a
The Duke is out of temper; if he knows Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 145
To-day, at the Duke Conrad's, where he keeps Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 92
By heavens, I'd rather kiss Duke Conrad's slipper, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 13
Fine wording, Duke ! but words could never yet Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 37
"To the Duke Conrad. Forget the threat you Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
You may be made a duke . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 54a
You, Duke ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 61b
You again, Duke ? Justice, most noble Otho! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 64
Here is the Duke , waiting with open arms Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 249
With triumph o'er that evil-witted Duke ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 270
Draw not the sword; 'twould make an uproar, Duke , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 169
For the Duke Conrad's. Close I follow'd them Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 124
Of Albert and Duke Conrad? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 5a
And for the Duke of Bretagne, like a stag King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 17
"I'll shirk the Duke of A.; I'll cut his brother; The Jealousies, Line 154
 
DUKEDOM'S.........1
Your dukedom's privilege will grant so much. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 55
 
DULCET............2
Of dulcet instruments came charmingly; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 942
Dulcet -eyed as Ceres' daughter, Fancy, Line 81
 
DULL..............31
"What though I leave this dull , and earthly mould, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 71
For you to try my dull , unlearned quill. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 51
That spreading in this dull and clodded earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 297
And the dull twanging bowstring, and the raft Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 334
Their tiptop nothings, their dull skies, their thrones- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 15
And emptied on't a black dull -gurgling phial: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 515
Escap'd from dull mortality's harsh net? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 907
Of our dull , uninspired, snail-paced lives. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 25
To set my dull and sadden'd spirit playing? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 46
Nor muffling thicket interpos'd to dull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 966
The dull of midnight, at her couch's foot Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 274
In dull November, and their chancel vault, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 37
Of shapeless Chaos. Say, doth the dull soil Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 217
The dull shell's echo, from a bowery strand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 274
If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 1
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 3
Though the dull brain perplexes and retards: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 34
Dull blockhead that I was to be so blind, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 22
For an embrace, to dull the appetite Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 124
Shall sprawl distracted! O that that dull cowl Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 92
Now the dull animal forsooth must be Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 19
Of these dull boughs,- this oven of dark thickets,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 20
For should he catch a glimpse of my dull garb, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 53
As earthly fires from dull dross can be cleans'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 41
To dull the nice remembrance of my home? Lamia, Part I, Line 275
Feigning a sleep; and he to the dull shade Lamia, Part II, Line 104
In the dull catalogue of common things. Lamia, Part II, Line 233
Thou shalt with those dull mortal eyes behold, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 247
To grow pale from the waves at dull midnight. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 458
That monstrous region, whose dull rivers pour What can I do to drive away, Line 34
A dull -eyed Argus watching for a fare; The Jealousies, Line 249
 
DULLARD...........1
To a cold dullard fay,- ah, woe betide! The Jealousies, Line 167
 
DULLED............1
mythology of Greece, and dulled its brightness: for I wish to try once more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph5
 
DULLER............1
With duller steel than the Persean sword Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 393
 
DULLEST...........1
Upon the floor the dullest spirit sees Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 35
 
DULLY.............1
Of earth's splenetic fire, dully drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 399
 
DULNESS...........1
In tranced dulness ; speak, and let that spell Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 768
 
DULY..............1
And therefore duly shall proceed to tell, The Jealousies, Line 790
 
DUMB..............10
Listen awhile ye nations, and be dumb . Addressed to the Same, Line 14
From vallies where the pipe is never dumb ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 200
And, truly, I would rather be struck dumb , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 824
Still dumb , ungrateful Nevis - still so cold! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 20
With dumb endeavour sweetly! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 47
Sweetly, with dumb endeavour, 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 52
Knights, ladies, praying in dumb orat'ries, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 16
But this so sudden kindness makes me dumb . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 30
sake, will be dumb as the grave. Erminia has my shame fix'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 60
And dumb enchantment. Who alive can say The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 11
 
DUMFOUNDER'D......1
Dumfounder'd in his speech? All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 18
 
DUN...............4
O'er many a heath, through many a woodland dun , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 72
Of some steep mossy hill, where ivy dun Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 671
The bosomer of clouds gold, grey, and dun . Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 4
That stubborn fool, that impudent state- dun , The Jealousies, Line 160
 
DUNCE.............1
That I am wise, that Pallas is a dunce - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 799
 
DUNGEON...........2
Into the dungeon core of that wild wood: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 565
Striving to be itself, what dungeon climes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 259
 
DUNGEON'D.........1
Dungeon'd in opaque element, to keep Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 23
 
DUNGEONED.........1
For when the conquer'd lion is once dungeoned , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 170
 
DUNGEONER.........1
Dungeoner of my friends, that wicked strand What can I do to drive away, Line 32
 
DUNGEONS..........1
Were deepest dungeons ; heaths and sunny glades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 693
 
DUPED.............1
Or be by phantoms duped . O destiny! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 629
 
DURING............1
During the pain Mnemosyne upheld Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 133
 
DUSK..............17
Of those dusk places in times far aloof Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 625
Forth from a rugged arch, in the dusk below, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 639
The light - the dusk - the dark - till break of day!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 136
There is a sleepy dusk , an odorous shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 362
In the dusk heavens silverly, when they Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 486
Dusk for our loves, yet light enough to grace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 676
This dusk religion, pomp of solitude, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 954
Do meet in the dusk to revel. For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 24
All close they met again, before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 81
All close they met, all eves, before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 83
His image in the dusk she seem'd to see, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 237
By the dusk curtains:- 'twas a midnight charm The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 282
Until the dusk eve left her dark The Eve of St. Mark, Line 51
Open'd upon the dusk demesnes of night; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 298
You have escap'd me, free as the dusk air, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
Reliev'd from the dusk vale. Mnemosyne The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 50
When the dusk holiday - or holinight- The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 10
 
DUSKETHA..........4
SALAMANDER, ZEPHYR, DUSKETHA , AND BREAMA Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, Dramatis Personae
Adder-eyed Dusketha , speak, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 67
Dusketha , so enchantingly Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 72
Sweet Dusketha ! Paradise! Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 86
 
DUSKING...........1
To one who travels from the dusking east: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 375
 
DUSKY.............10
Passing along before a dusky space Sleep and Poetry, Line 139
My pilgrimage for the world's dusky brink. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 977
A dusky empire and its diadems; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 224
Sink downward to his dusky cave again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 384
Through many a dusky gallery, they gain The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 186
More thought than woe was in her dusky face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 56
Bright, and cirque-couchant in a dusky brake. Lamia, Part I, Line 46
Of some arch'd temple door, or dusky colonnade. Lamia, Part I, Line 361
With head inclined, each dusky lineament The Jealousies, Line 264
"From two to half-past, dusky way we made, The Jealousies, Line 658
 
DUST..............3
So, we must lick the dust ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 178a
Is- Love, forgive us!- cinders, ashes, dust ; Lamia, Part II, Line 2
Thy flesh, near cousin to the common dust , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 109
 
DUSTY.............2
Go, page his dusty heels upon a march, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 81
My parents' bones are in their dusty urns Lamia, Part II, Line 94
 
DUTIES............1
And what our duties there: to nightly call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 362
 
DUTIFUL...........1
Being a wife most mild and dutiful . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 77
 
DUTY..............4
And pointed out the patriot's stern duty ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 69
The world has done its duty . Yet, oh yet, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 728
For a mere act of duty . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 181a
Said Hum, "in duty , and in vassalage, The Jealousies, Line 374
 
DWARF.............6
No one to see my Ape, my Dwarf , my Fool, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 13
Ape, Dwarf , and Fool, why stand you gaping there? When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 15
The Dwarf began to tremble and the Ape When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 18
The Dwarf with piteous face began to rhyme. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 21
The first, alas! poor Dwarf , I understand- When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 25
While the Dwarf spake the Princess all for spite When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 41
 
DWARFISH..........1
"Get hence! get hence! there's dwarfish Hildebrand; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 100
 
DWARFY............1
Well done - for by what Mr. Dwarfy said, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 81
 
DWELL.............4
O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell , O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell, Line 1
For sweet relief I'll dwell Sleep and Poetry, Line 312b
Wilt be content to dwell with her, to share Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 871
They could not in the self-same mansion dwell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 3
 
DWELLERS..........1
Meet some of our near- dwellers with my car." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 989
 
DWELLING..........9
For thee, she will thy every dwelling grace, To George Felton Mathew, Line 74
To the blue dwelling of divine Urania: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 41
From out its crystal dwelling in a lake, Sleep and Poetry, Line 225
The incense went to her own starry dwelling . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 198
My love's far dwelling . Though the playful rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 179
Where shall our dwelling be? Under the brow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 670
Upon the skirts of human-nature dwelling Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 306
Dwelling in the old Minster Square; The Eve of St. Mark, Line 40
He'll surmise sagely of a dwelling -house, The Jealousies, Line 58
 
DWELLINGS.........2
The dwellings of this war-surrounded isle; On Peace, Line 2
Into the dwellings , through the door crannies, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 206
 
DWELLS............6
The soul delighted on each accent dwells ,- Ode to Apollo, Line 15
Enraptured dwells , - not daring to respire, Ode to Apollo, Line 16
Dwells here and there with people of no name, Addressed to Haydon, Line 3
Welcome the float of Thetis. Long he dwells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 611
Strange journeyings! Wherever beauty dwells , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 93
She dwells with Beauty - Beauty that must die; Ode on Melancholy, Line 21
 
DWELT.............6
The light dwelt o'er the scene so lingeringly. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 5
And buoyant round my limbs. At first I dwelt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 384
How have I dwelt in fear of fate: 'tis done- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1023
With her two brothers this fair lady dwelt , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 105
For somewhere in that sacred island dwelt Lamia, Part I, Line 13
She dwelt but half retir'd, and there had led Lamia, Part I, Line 312
 
DWINDLED..........1
And trace the dwindled edgings of its brim; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 18
 
DWINDLING.........1
me, if I had not some hope that while it is dwindling I may be plotting, and Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
DYE...............2
Vieing with fish of brilliant dye below; Imitation of Spenser, Line 11
I cannot look upon the rose's dye , Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 7
 
DYED..............2
Thy beauty's shield, heart-shap'd and vermeil dyed ? The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 336
Which needs had been of dyed asbestus wove, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 74
 
DYES..............4
There darts strange light of varied hues and dyes : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 541
She took their cream of beauty, fairest dyes , Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 3
Innumerable of stains and splendid dyes , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 212
Of powerful instruments:- the gorgeous dyes , Lamia, Part II, Line 205
 
DYING.............26
Still warble, dying swan, - still tell the tale, To Lord Byron, Line 13
Melted in dying murmurs! O how nigh Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 6
The dying tones that fill the air, Ode to Apollo, Line 45
Revive the dying tones of minstrelsy, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 32
Are emblems true of hapless lovers dying : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 90
Up to its climax and then dying proudly? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 61
That they are dying like an outburnt lamp; Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 11
Her languid arms in silver slumber dying : Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 3
That lingered in the air like dying rolls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 309
Of dying fish; the vermeil rose had blown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 696
Faints into sleep, with many a dying tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 950
An unseiz'd heaven dying at his feet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 464
Or they are but the ghosts, the dying swells Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 914
How dying I shall kiss that lily hand.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 118
Let me have music dying , and I seek Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 140
Dying to embers from their native fire! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 366
Let not quick Winter chill its dying hour!- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 450
Ink'd purple with a song concerning dying ; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 43
Affray his ears, though but in dying tone:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 260
Of dying Echo, echoed. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13a
There - hug him - dying ! O, thou innocence, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
Sometimes the counsel of a dying man Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 41
And fain would I catch up his dying words, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 42
While barred clouds bloom the soft- dying day, To Autumn, Line 25
That even the dying man forgets his shroud; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 101
Swelling upon the silence; dying off; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 376
 
DYINGLY...........1
And weave them dyingly - send honey-whispers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 955
 
DYKE..............1
With dyke and ditch For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 26


Published @ RC

March 2005