Printer-friendly versionSend by email
Keats Concordance
 
E'EN..............14
I could e'en Dido of her grief beguile; Imitation of Spenser, Line 21
E'en so the words of love beguile, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 21
E'en then, elate, my spirit leaps, and prances, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 6
E'en then my soul with exultation dances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 7
These lures I straight forget, - e'en ere I dine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 24
Or e'en the touch of Archimago's wand, Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 6
E'en like the passage of an angel's tear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 13
E'en now, dear George, while this for you I write, To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 9
E'en now I'm pillow'd on a bed of flowers To My Brother George (epistle), Line 123
E'en in this isle; and who could paragon Sleep and Poetry, Line 172
E'en now all tumult from my bosom fades: Sleep and Poetry, Line 315
E'en for his Highness Ludolph's sceptry hand, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 109
E'en to her chamber-door, and there, fair boy,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 9
When I had heard e'en of thy death perhaps, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 21
 
E'ER..............24
As e'er from Lethe's waves was quaft, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 8
That e'er my rev'ling eyes beheld, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 11
That e'er my wand'ring fancy spell'd! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 12
Should e'er unhappy love my bosom pain, To Hope, Line 25
Nor e'er will the notes from their tenderness change; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 35
Nor e'er will the music of Oberon die. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 36
Ah! who can e'er forget so fair a being? Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 29
Had I e'er seen her from an arbour take Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 40
Should e'er the fine-eyed maid to me be kind, To George Felton Mathew, Line 35
No spherey strains by me could e'er be caught To My Brother George (epistle), Line 4
And can I e'er these benefits forget? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 76
And can I e'er repay the friendly debt? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 77
Should it e'er be so, what a rich content! To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 83
E'er grew in Paphos, from the bitter weeds Sleep and Poetry, Line 249
Than e'er reflected in its pleasant cool I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 168
No man e'er panted for a mortal love. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 526
She sings but to her love, nor e'er conceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 830
The fairest face that morn e'er look'd upon Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 424
Yet be the anchor e'er so fast, room is there for a prayer There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 45
With all the gardener Fancy e'er could feign, Ode to Psyche, Line 62
Why thou art desolate, can e'er return. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 40
Her lips - I swear no human bones e'er wore Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 71
Could e'er have touch'd there. Sounds AEolian Lamia, Part I, Line 386
Stuck in his moral throat, no coughing e'er could stir. The Jealousies, Line 108
 
EAGER.............13
Round about with eager pry. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 30
His healthful spirit eager and awake Calidore: A Fragment, Line 2
And faint away, before my eager view: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 588
Therefore I eager followed, and did curse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 704
His limbs are loos'd, and eager , on he hies Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 67
Headlong I darted; at one eager swirl Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 630
Parted its dripping leaves with eager care. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 678
The carved angels, ever eager -eyed, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 34
Eager to sail their orb; the porches wide Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 297
Which he with eager guess began to read Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 48
Kept undulation round his eager neck. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 132
The edge of his sharp wrath to eager kindness. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 55
Keeps elbow room amid our eager swords, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 36
 
EAGERLY...........3
So pushes off his boat most eagerly , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 59
And some are hearing, eagerly , the wild Sleep and Poetry, Line 370
No, no, too eagerly my soul deceives Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 701
 
EAGERNESS.........1
The way was short, for Lamia's eagerness Lamia, Part I, Line 344
 
EAGLE.............15
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 11
Than wings of swans, than doves, than dim-seen eagle ? Sleep and Poetry, Line 22
Like a sick eagle looking at the sky. On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 5
Vex'd like a morning eagle , lost and weary, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 635
Towards him a large eagle , 'twixt whose wings, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 658
The eagle landed him, and farewel took. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 669
And elephant, and eagle , and huge jaw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 135
Soon with an eagle nativeness their gaze Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 860
Speeding away swift as the eagle bird? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 594
First with the whales, last with the eagle skies; To Ailsa Rock, Line 12
Wren or eagle , finds his way to Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 9
Fresh hatch'd in my ambition's eagle -nest; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 41
The eagle Otho to beat off assault. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 126
But one of our whole eagle -brood still keeps The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 13
Can burst the meshes. Not the eagle more King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 29
 
EAGLE'S...........8
The eagle's feathery mane God of the golden bow, Line 15
Forgive me that I have not eagle's wings- To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 3
To save poor lambkins from the eagle's maw; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 267
The Olympian eagle's vision, is dark, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 911
Is in an eagle's claws. God of the meridian, Line 15
Oh pain - for since the eagle's earliest scream Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 25
Flush'd angerly: while sometimes eagle's wings, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 182
Upon an eagle's watch, that I might see, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 309
 
EAGLES............8
And eagles struggle with the buffeting north Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 643
Like callow eagles at the first sunrise. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 859
High as the eagles . Like two drops of dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 348
Eagles may seem to sleep wing-wide upon the air; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 19
Which eagles cleave upmounting from their nest. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 157
But eagles golden-feather'd, who do tower Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 226
To muster kites and eagles 'gainst my head? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 87
They are no birds when eagles are abroad. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 192
 
EAR...............50
That pains my wounded ear . Lines Written on 29 May, Line 6
And charm the ear of evening fair, Ode to Apollo, Line 46
My ear is open like a greedy shark, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 27
Thine ear , and find thy gentle heart; so well Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 3
Came to his ear , like something from beyond Calidore: A Fragment, Line 100
Returning home at evening, with an ear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 9
Whose tones reach nought on earth but Poet's ear . To My Brother George (epistle), Line 32
And little fit to please a classic ear ; To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 24
Some with their faces muffled to the ear Sleep and Poetry, Line 144
Into my fancy's ear Unfelt, unheard, unseen, Line 10
In lone Endymion's ear , now he has raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 282
Upon my ear a noisy nothing rings- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 321
As plainly in his ear , as the faint charm Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 356
Dew-dropping melody, in the Carian's ear ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 373
Sweet paining on his ear : he sickly guess'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 856
He kept an anxious ear . The humming tone Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 916
Not native in such barren vaults. Give ear ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 935
From their poor breasts went sueing to her ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 519
Can mingle music fit for the soft ear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 974
Lend thine ear , Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 17
But my fond ear , in fancy at thy lips, Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 10
Some English that might strive thine ear to please. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 4
That I may speak my grief into thine ear ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 58
On his ear like mother-tongue; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 15
Go, pretty page, and in her ear Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 8
The dame return'd, and whisper'd in his ear The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 183
Close to her ear touching the melody;- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 293
Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 308
She laid, and to the level of his ear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 46
Thus whisper'd low and solemn in his ear . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 308
O speak your counsel now, for Saturn's ear Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 162
Unwearied ear of the whole universe Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 65
Even into thine own soft-conched ear : Ode to Psyche, Line 4
A jilt, whose ear was never whisper'd close, On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 7
By ear industrious, and attention meet; If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 9
Not to the sensual ear , but, more endear'd, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 13
Not to thine ear alone I make confession, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 173
Come close, and let me breathe into thine ear Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 126
Then to the tender ear of her June days, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 135
Our ear is open. First we here denounce Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 113
Burnt from his winged heels to either ear , Lamia, Part I, Line 23
Those melodies sung into the world's ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 188
Came brief upon mine ear ,- "So Saturn sat The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 301
She laid, and to the level of his hollow ear The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 348
I humanize my sayings to thine ear , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 2
A meek attentive ear , so that they treat King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 11
Predestin'd for his ear , scape as half check'd King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 54
Mustachios, ear -ring, nose-ring, and his sabre keen. The Jealousies, Line 279
Both, prostrate on the carpet, ear by ear, The Jealousies, Line 336
Both, prostrate on the carpet, ear by ear , The Jealousies, Line 336
 
EAR'D.............1
Our gold and ripe- ear'd hopes. With not one tinge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 8
 
EARED.............1
O lank- eared Phantoms of black-weeded pools! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 230
 
EARL..............11
EARL OF GLOCESTER King Stephen 2
EARL OF CHESTER King Stephen 3
EARL BALDWIN DE REDVERS King Stephen 4
[Enter EARL BALDWIN, and Soldiers, as defeated. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 19b
On, fellow soldiers! Earl of Redvers, back! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 34
Most noble Earl ! King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 9b
It paunch'd the Earl of Chester's horse, who then King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 42
The Earl of Glocester. Stab to the hilts, De Kaims, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 45
[Trumpets. Enter the EARL OF CHESTER and Knights. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 47
Has anger'd me. The noble Earl , methinks, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 30
The generous Earl condoles in his mishaps, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 41
 
EARLIER...........1
In earlier Sicilian? or thy smiles Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 5
 
EARLIEST..........3
At Vesper's earliest twinkle - they are gone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 915
Oh pain - for since the eagle's earliest scream Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 25
That all day long, from earliest morn, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 26
 
EARLS.............2
Not twenty Earls of Chester shall brow-beat King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 35
QUEEN MAUD in a chair of state. The EARLS OF GLOCESTER and King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
 
EARLY.............13
Caught from the early sobbing of the morn. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 7
For if we wander out in early morn, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 2
The shrine of Flora in her early May. To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 8
Now while the early budders are just new, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 41
His early song against yon breezy sky, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 221
Get up early There was a naughty boy, Line 70
Belong'd to one whose early pall O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 57
'Tis the early April lark, Fancy, Line 44
To that large utterance of the early Gods! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 51
Fair on your Graces fall this early morrow! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 124
'Tis early dawn. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Sigifred, Line 51a
To that large utterance of the early Gods!- The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 353
Saluted, as we pass'd, an early rook- The Jealousies, Line 709
 
EARNEST...........11
At nothing; just as though the earnest frown Sleep and Poetry, Line 382
The earnest trumpet spake, and silver thrills Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 197
And earnest a kiss on the brow, Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 6
Tall oaks, branch-charmed by the earnest stars, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 74
Surely you spared him at my earnest prayer? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 64
Why should he be so earnest ? Come, my friend, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 131
Light flew his earnest words, among the blossoms blown. Lamia, Part I, Line 91
Then spake, so much more earnest , that the breath The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 195
Spake out, so much more earnest , that her breath The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 217
Forests, branch-charmed by the earnest stars, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 373
Of earnest grasping, would, if it were cold This living hand, now warm and capable, Line 2
 
EARNESTLY.........3
Earnestly round as wishing to espy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 112
Sweeping, eye- earnestly , through almond vales: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 380
And earnestly said: "Brother, 'tis vain to hide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 505
 
EARS..............46
Still sounded in my ears , when I no more To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 123
The while let music wander round my ears , On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 9
In woven baskets bringing ears of corn, To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 6
O ye whose ears are dinned with uproar rude, On the Sea, Line 11
For many moments, ere their ears were sated Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 114
Her pearl round ears , white neck, and orbed brow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 616
A careful moving, caught my waking ears , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 680
To sue her gentle ears for whose fair head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 953
Blustering about my ears : aye, thou shalt see, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 981
Was Hesperean; to his capable ears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 674
Has it been ever sounding for those ears Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 840
In wakeful ears , like uproar past and gone- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 19
Poisonous about my ears , and louder grew, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 491
Their full-veined ears , nostrils blood wide, and stop; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 400
"Aye, but a buzzing by my ears has flown, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 875
Those velvet ears - but prythee do not stick To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 5
But rolls about our ears Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 4
Than idle ears should pleasure in their woe. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 88
For them his ears gush'd blood; for them in death Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 115
From his lorn voice, and past his loamed ears Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 279
Of heaven, and few ears Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia, Line 11
Open your ears and stay your trudge All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 3
Moon, keep wide thy golden ears ; 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 10
Awake, with horrid shout, my foeman's ears , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 152
Affray his ears , though but in dying tone:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 260
There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 348
Than he prick'd up his ears and said, "Well done; When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 76
Shut up your senses, stifle up your ears , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 175
That did both drown and keep alive my ears . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 277
And I was stopping up my frantic ears , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 290
Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain- Ode to a Nightingale, Line 59
A father's ears with tidings of his son. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 70
Who sung far different notes into mine ears . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 42
O for a voice to reach the Emperor's ears ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 6
And sing for my delight, I'd stop my ears ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
Into my ears . Pr'ythee, let me be spared Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 3
Any diviner eloquence,- woo her ears Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
Her ears , and she shall take them coupled with Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 16
An oath, and through the serpent's ears it ran Lamia, Part I, Line 113
So sweetly to these ravish'd ears of mine Lamia, Part I, Line 268
Soft showering in mine ears , and, by the touch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 23
Stung my own ears - I strove hard to escape The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 127
And ears act with that pleasant unison of sense The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 442
Could reach your dastard ears and fright you more! King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 8
Over heads and ears , King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 15b
Cut off my ears and hands, or head too, by my fay! The Jealousies, Line 468
 
EARTH.............95
On earth the good man base detraction bars Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 13
We listen here on earth : Ode to Apollo, Line 44
Of this sweet spot of earth . The bowery shore Calidore: A Fragment, Line 26
Come to the earth ; with an incline so sweet Calidore: A Fragment, Line 86
In water, earth , or air, but poesy. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 22
Whose tones reach nought on earth but Poet's ear. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 32
Great spirits now on earth are sojourning; Addressed to the Same, Line 1
When some good spirit walks upon the earth , To Kosciusko, Line 10
About the earth : happy are ye and glad. Sleep and Poetry, Line 229
The poetry of earth is never dead: On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 1
The poetry of earth is ceasing never: On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 9
What is there in the universal earth To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 1
The seeds and roots in earth God of the golden bow, Line 27
A flowery band to bind us to the earth , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 7
A mighty forest; for the moist earth fed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 64
When the great deity, for earth too ripe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 142
The earth is glad: the merry lark has pour'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 220
Now while the earth was drinking it, and while Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 227
That spreading in this dull and clodded earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 297
Like one who on the earth had never stept- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 404
Speak, stubborn earth , and tell me where, O where Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 608
Of heaven and earth had faded: deepest shades Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 692
That one who through this middle earth should pass Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 723
The earth its dower of river, wood, and vale, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 838
The silent mysteries of earth , descend!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 214
But, finding in our green earth sweet contents, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 313
The earth clos'd - gave a solitary moan- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 586
The visions of the earth were gone and fled- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1022
Who first were on the earth ; and sculptures rude Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 131
Then came a conquering earth -thunder, and rumbled Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 487
Unfortunates on earth , we see at last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 980
The heavens and earth in one to such a death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 81
Through the dark earth , and through the wondrous sea? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 91
Outblackens Erebus, and the full-cavern'd earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 121
For wine we follow Bacchus through the earth ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 235
The teeming earth a sudden witness bore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 338
Far from the earth away - unseen, alone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 350
His very goddess: good-bye earth , and sea, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 431
Dropt hawkwise to the earth . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 512a
His first touch of the earth went nigh to kill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 614
Behold upon this happy earth we are; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 625
On earth I may not love thee; and therefore Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 659
Wilt thou devote this body to the earth : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 731
Beauty, in things on earth and things above; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 21
For an inhabitant of wintry earth Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 6
Of either earth of heaven?- It is a flaw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 82
To speak as when on earth it was awake, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 283
To Dian, Queen of Earth , and Heaven, and Hell. To Homer, Line 14
Before the earth beneath me; even such, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 8
A cave of young earth dragons - well, my boy, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 55
When I beheld her on the earth descend, Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 9
When the soundless earth is muffled, Fancy, Line 19
Beauties that the earth hath lost; Fancy, Line 30
Ye have left your souls on earth ! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 2
Perfume which on earth is not; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 16
On the earth ye live again; Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 24
Here, your earth -born souls still speak Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 29
Ye have left your souls on earth ! Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 38
While his bow'd head seem'd list'ning to the Earth , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 20
For heaven is parted from thee, and the earth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 55
The frozen God still couchant on the earth , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 87
Here on this spot of earth . Search, Thea, search! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 116
Then living on the earth , with labouring thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 279
"O brightest of my children dear, earth -born Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 309
Before the tense string murmur.- To the earth ! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 345
Of element, earth , water, air, and fire,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 140
The Heavens and the Earth , were manifest: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 199
As Heaven and Earth are fairer, fairer far Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 206
And as we show beyond that Heaven and Earth Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 208
Underneath earth -quaked mountains; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 82
Cool'd a long age in the deep-delved earth , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 12
Ye know on earth , and all ye need to know. Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 50
Toil hard, ye slaves, and from the miser- earth Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 10
For what can any man on earth do more? Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 182
Who waits for thee, as the chapp'd earth for rain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 33
O that the earth were empty, as when Cain Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 1
This little ball of earth , and chuck it them Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 24
This earth ,- this palace,- this room,- Auranthe! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 44
With pleasant weight, the amorous-aching earth , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 26
The earth would shudder at so foul a deed! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 52
Either of heaven or earth , can cure, unless Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 4
Sad, that the fairest creature of the earth - Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 91
Or friends or kinsfolk on the citied earth , Lamia, Part II, Line 90
More yearning than on earth I ever felt The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 39
The like upon the earth ; what I had seen The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 66
A fever of thyself - think of the earth ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 169
While his bow'd head seem'd listening to the Earth , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 325
For heaven is parted from thee, and the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 357
She press'd her fair large forehead to the earth , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 379
The frozen God still bending to the earth , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 386
Clouds still with shadowy moisture haunt the earth , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 420
Methought I heard some old man of the earth The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 440
For as upon the earth dire prodigies The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 18
To mention all the Berthas in the earth ;- The Jealousies, Line 375
Where from the earth we heard a lively tune The Jealousies, Line 687
 
EARTH'S...........9
That breast, earth's only paradise! Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 16
Or the low rumblings earth's regions under; Sleep and Poetry, Line 28
Until into earth's deep maw he rush'd: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 899
I met thee in earth's bosom, all my power Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 905
Of earth's splenetic fire, dully drop Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 399
Who lives beyond earth's boundary, grief is dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 620
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 6
Drown both, and press them both against earth's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 145
In the earth's wide entrails old Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 69
 
EARTHLY...........19
Where never yet was ought more earthly seen Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 53
"What though I leave this dull, and earthly mould, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 71
Over their beauties, earthly , or sublime: How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 4
Of all the chances in their earthly walk; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 388
To fret at myriads of earthly wrecks. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 776
"Now, if this earthly love has power to make Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 843
Nought earthly worth my compassing; so stand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 162
Meant but to fertilize my earthly root, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 907
All earthly pleasure, all imagin'd good, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 743
If impiously an earthly realm I take. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 854
And by the kernel of thine earthly love, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 20
Too earthly ye are for my sport; Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 3
Though I forget the taste of earthly bliss, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 315
And gave a roar, as if of earthly fire, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 215
As earthly fires from dull dross can be cleans'd; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 41
A song of love, too sweet for earthly lyres, Lamia, Part I, Line 299
Bewailing earthly loss; nor could my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 441
Making comparisons of earthly things; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 3
And gave a roar, as if of earthly fire, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 59
 
EARTHQUAKE........2
Drown'd wast thou till an earthquake made thee steep- To Ailsa Rock, Line 13
I shall earthquake - Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 32
 
EARTHQUAKES.......2
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 200
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 44
 
EARTHWARD.........2
Abrupt in middle air? Yet earthward bend Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 653
And my body is earthward press'd: God of the meridian, Line 4
 
EARTHY............1
And they had found Lorenzo's earthy bed; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 351
 
EAS'D.............3
Me even to tears: thence, when a little eas'd , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 559
Eas'd in one accent his o'er-burden'd soul, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 229
Who eas'd the crownet from your infant brows, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 135
 
EASE..............26
Who had on Baiae's shore reclin'd at ease , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 29
Spenserian vowels that elope with ease , To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 56
I shall roll on the grass with two-fold ease : To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 79
And still will dance with ever varied ease , Sleep and Poetry, Line 115
The pleasant day, upon a couch at ease . Sleep and Poetry, Line 353
He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed. On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 8
And plenty of ease , The Gothic looks solemn, Line 14
And sink thus low! but I will ease my breast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 538
Of silent happiness, of slumberous ease : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 324
And one another, in soft ease Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 10
Doth ease its heart of love in. - I am gone Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 112
He pac'd away the pleasant hours of ease Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 194
Till on the level height their steps found ease : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 88
And dotes the more upon a heart at ease ; On Fame ("Fame, like a wayward girl"), Line 4
Singest of summer in full-throated ease . Ode to a Nightingale, Line 10
To ease my breast of melodies- Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 7
Which, being pleasant, ease the heavy pulse, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 185
We must endeavour how to ease and slacken Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 25
Stretch'd out, at ease , beneath a glutinous pine; Lamia, Part I, Line 210
Might fancy-fit his brows, silk-pillow'd at his ease . Lamia, Part II, Line 220
Doth ease its heart of love in. Moan and wail. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 417
He paces through the pleasant hours of ease , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 38
O ease my heart of verse and let me rest; To Fanny, Line 2
For flatteries to ease this Stephen's hours, King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Chester, Line 49
Poor Elfinan is very ill at ease - The Jealousies, Line 121
Your pulse is shocking, but I'll ease your pain." The Jealousies, Line 426
 
EASEFUL...........1
I have been half in love with easeful Death, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 52
 
EASILY............3
Easily onward, thorough flowers and weed. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 62
Easily rolling so as scarce to mar Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 166
Down marble steps; pouring as easily Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 814
 
EASING............1
Who simply tell the most heart- easing things. Sleep and Poetry, Line 268
 
EAST..............18
Just as the sun was from the east uprising; To George Felton Mathew, Line 80
Into the east , to meet the smiling day: To Leigh Hunt, Esq., Line 4
Of their star in the east and gone to worship them. To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 14
For it came more softly than the east could blow Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 359
Mantling the east , by Aurora's peering hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 113
They shoulder'd on towards that brightening east . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 835
From natural west, and east , and south, and north, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 876
Of trumpets at clear parley from the east Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 553
Beam'd upward from the vallies of the east : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 727
And of the east and west! God of the meridian, Line 2
Frozen north, and chilling east , Robin Hood, Line 7
How could these money-bags see east and west?- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 142
There lies beneath my east leg's northern heel Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 54
Each day from east to west the heavens through, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 270
To one who travels from the dusking east : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 375
When in mid-May the sickening east wind The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 97
Besides the goods meanwhile thou movest east and west. The Jealousies, Line 243
With fiery shudder through the bloomed east ; The Jealousies, Line 717
 
EASTERN...........6
Upsoars, and darts into the eastern light, As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 2
To see the sun o'er peep the eastern dimness, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 86
Made every eastern cloud a silvery pyre Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 96
There came an eastern voice of solemn mood:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 10
To the eastern gates, and full six dewy hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 264
The eastern soft wind, and his galley now Lamia, Part I, Line 223
 
EASTWARD..........2
Spread greyly eastward , thus a chorus sang: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 231
Of nothing, then to eastward , where black gates The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 85
 
EASY..............11
Of easy slopes, and shadowy trees that lean Calidore: A Fragment, Line 10
Comes up with ripple, and with easy float, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 20
From little cares:- to find, with easy quest, Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 6
To startle princes from their easy slumbers. To My Brother George (epistle), Line 76
Their verses tallied. Easy was the task: Sleep and Poetry, Line 199
It seem'd he flew, the way so easy was; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 69
Takes in all beauty with an easy span: Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 4
Half-ignorant, they turn'd an easy wheel, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 119
By one, and one, the bolts full easy slide:- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 367
Possible!- Easy ! O my heart! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 52b
Until most easy matters take the shape Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 125
 
EAT...............3
And for each briar-berry he might eat , Extracts from an Opera, [first section] Line 7
"You cannot eat your cake and have it too." Proverb On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Epigraph
Despair, or eat thy words! Why, thou wast nigh Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 96
 
EATEN.............1
Even to the hollows of time- eaten oaks, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 408
 
EATS..............2
Who now, with greedy looks, eats up my feast? To Fanny, Line 17
Eats wholesome, sweet, and palatable food King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 27


Published @ RC

March 2005