Eb-Em - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
EBAN..............10
"At the same time, Eban ,"- (this was his page, The Jealousies, Line 181
"At the same time, Eban , this instant go The Jealousies, Line 187
Eban , untempted by the pastry-cooks, The Jealousies, Line 217
Eban then paid his fare, and tiptoe went The Jealousies, Line 262
To- "Hush - hush!" cried Eban , "sure that is he The Jealousies, Line 300
And said: "Don't tell me what you want, Eban ; The Jealousies, Line 317
When Eban thought he heard a soft imperial snore. The Jealousies, Line 324
Eban then usher'd in the learned seer: The Jealousies, Line 334
Eban especially, who on the floor 'gan The Jealousies, Line 339
" Eban ," said he, "as slaves should taste the fruits The Jealousies, Line 353
 
EBB...............5
Moving but with the mighty ebb and flow. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 387
One million times ocean must ebb and flow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 694
While the great waters are at ebb and flow.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 94
Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb ; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 1
Ebb spouting to the lees;- if I pledge not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 50
 
EBB'D.............1
Low- ebb'd still hid it up in shallow gloom;- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 136
 
EBBING............3
Sweet sister, help to stem the ebbing sea Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 709
As if the ebbing air had but one wave; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 78
As if the ebbing air had but one wave; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 377
 
EBBS..............2
Until his royal spirit softly ebbs Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 106
Of stifling numbers ebbs from my full breast. To Fanny, Line 4
 
EBON..............6
By a swan's ebon bill; from a thick brake, Sleep and Poetry, Line 226
With ebon -tipped flutes: close after these, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 147
Her ebon urn, young Mercury, by stealth, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 562
Full facing their swift flight, from ebon streak, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 496
My ebon sofa should delicious be Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 65
Completed by her twin-arch'd ebon -brows; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 63
 
EBONY.............1
Beneath the waves like Afric's ebony , Imitation of Spenser, Line 17
 
ECHO..............21
Fain would I echo back each pleasant note To George Felton Mathew, Line 13
And echo back the voice of thine own tongue? Sleep and Poetry, Line 52
Or 'tis the cell of Echo , where she sits, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 947
O charitable Echo ! hear, and sing Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 958
Than the isle of Delos. Echo hence shall stir Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 966
One sigh doth echo , one poor sob doth pine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 6
Without an echo ? Then shall I be left Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 684
Save echo , faint repeating o'er and o'er Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1011
Echo into oblivion, he said:- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 233
Where lone Echo gives the half Robin Hood, Line 16
An echo of sweet music doth create Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 62
Her lute-string gave an echo of his name, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 15
An echo of thee in the north-wind sung. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 160
O Echo , Echo, from some sombre isle, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 435
O Echo, Echo , from some sombre isle, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 435
O Echo , Echo, on some other day, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 483
O Echo, Echo , on some other day, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 483
The dull shell's echo , from a bowery strand Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 274
My echo , my taught parrot! but I fear Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 40
Of dying Echo , echoed. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13a
With its sad echo did the silence break. Lamia, Part II, Line 270
 
ECHO'D............1
And 'tis but echo'd from departing sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 850
 
ECHO'S............1
Of young Narcissus, and sad Echo's bale. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 180
 
ECHOED............5
Be echoed swiftly through that ivory shell Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 2
No! loudly echoed times innumerable. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 296
Of dying Echo, echoed . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 13a
"A Serpent!" echoed he; no sooner said, Lamia, Part II, Line 305
Into times past, yet to be echoed sure King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 4
 
ECHOES............4
Till its echoes depart; then I sink to repose. On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 40
To light-hung leaves, in smoothest echoes breaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 119
By the dim echoes of old Triton's horn: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 206
By all the echoes that about thee ring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 277
 
ECHOING...........7
Echoing grottos, full of tumbling waves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 459
Of sudden voices, echoing , "Come! come! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 501
My silent thoughts are echoing from these shells; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 913
Even these words went echoing dismally Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 322
Past the echoing minster gate. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 60
Why do you make such echoing of his name? King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 30
In echoing places; when the winds respire, The Jealousies, Line 571
 
ECLIPS'D..........1
Eclips'd her crescents, and lick'd up her stars: Lamia, Part I, Line 160
 
ECLIPSE...........2
Its sweets in the wrong sense.- Thou dost eclipse Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 12
While still the dazzling globe maintain'd eclipse , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 288
 
ECLIPSER..........1
Dear unseen light in darkness! eclipser Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 986
 
ECLIPSING.........1
Over eclipsing eyes: and at the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 877
 
ECSTASY...........2
In such an ecstasy ! Ode to a Nightingale, Line 58
What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy ? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 10
 
EDDIES............2
And straightway into frightful eddies swoop'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 648
She fathoms eddies , and runs wild about Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 87
 
EDDYING...........1
Should be engulphed in the eddying wind. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 846
 
EDEN..............2
A very Eden that same place must be! Fragment of Castle-builder, BERNADINE, Line 5
And then, from twelve till two, this Eden made is Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 12
 
EDG'D.............2
Edg'd round with dark tree tops? through which a dove Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 86
Was sitting on a square edg'd polish'd stone, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 51
 
EDGE..............5
At the bath's edge , and keeps a gentle motion Sleep and Poetry, Line 375
Heave his broad shoulder o'er the edge of the world, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 530
The edge of his sharp wrath to eager kindness. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 55
Driven me to the very edge o' the world, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 52
Its threatening edge against a good king's quiet; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
 
EDGES.............2
And once, above the edges of our nest, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 670
Edges them round, and they have golden pits: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 875
 
EDGEWAYS..........1
Lay vast and edgeways ; like a dismal cirque Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 34
 
EDGEWORTH'S.......1
And Hazlitt playing with Miss Edgeworth's cat; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 10
 
EDGINGS...........1
And trace the dwindled edgings of its brim; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 18
 
EDIFICE...........1
Of divers brilliances? 'tis the edifice Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 719
 
EELS..............1
To catch a glance at silver throated eels ,- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 393
 
EFFACE............1
"What wondrous beauty! From this moment I efface from my mind all Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
 
EFFIGIES..........1
O monstrous forms! O effigies of pain! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 228
 
EGEAN.............1
Of Doris, and the Egean seer, her spouse- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1000
 
EGGS..............4
Her ready eggs , before I'll kissing snatch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1026
As bird on wing to breast its eggs again; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 470
Freckled nest- eggs thou shalt see Fancy, Line 59
Two or three dove's eggs Two or three posies, Line 27
 
EGINA.............1
In port Cenchreas, from Egina isle Lamia, Part I, Line 225
 
EGLANTINE.........4
Into the winds: rain-scented eglantine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 100
Its sides I'll plant with dew-sweet eglantine , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 697
His dewy rosary on the eglantine ." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 188
White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine ; Ode to a Nightingale, Line 46
 
EGYPT.............3
"I saw Osirian Egypt kneel adown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 257
The Queen of Egypt melted, and I'll say And what is Love?- It is a doll dress'd up, Line 16
When sages look'd to Egypt for their lore. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 33
 
EGYPT'S...........1
A straying from his toil? Hot Egypt's pest Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 140
 
EGYPTIAN..........1
Far as Egyptian Nile. My passion grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 407
 
EIGHTY............1
Was as eighty There was a naughty boy, Line 108
 
EITHER............13
On either side. These, gentle Calidore Calidore: A Fragment, Line 32
On either side; pitying the sad death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 327
On either side outgush'd, with misty spray, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 918
Moved either host. On a wide sand they met, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 822
Of either earth of heaven?- It is a flaw Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 82
Either in lovers, husbands, or expence. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 58
Either of heaven or earth, can cure, unless Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 4
Cheeks fashion'd tenderly on either side, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 66
Burnt from his winged heels to either ear, Lamia, Part I, Line 23
Of palm and plantain, met from either side, Lamia, Part II, Line 126
From either side their stems branch'd one to one Lamia, Part II, Line 129
To be approach'd on either side by steps, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 90
If either of their two Archbishops' graces The Jealousies, Line 537
 
ELATE.............5
How soon that voice, majestic and elate , Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 5
As the sky-searching lark, and as elate . Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 4
E'en then, elate , my spirit leaps, and prances, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 6
They knew not whence this bounty, and elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 370
At which that dark-eyed stranger stood elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 977
 
ELBOW.............7
Guarding his forehead, with her round elbow , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 416
And elbow -deep with feverous fingering Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 54
While nudging the elbow of Momus! Spirit here that reignest, Line 17
Upon his elbow rais'd, all prostrate else, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 65
Keeps elbow room amid our eager swords, King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Knight, Line 36
Let o'er the silk his propping elbow slide, The Jealousies, Line 200
His elbow for a prop, and snuff'd his mignionette. The Jealousies, Line 567
 
ELBOWS............2
By following fat elbows up a court. Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 19
Frill-rumpling elbows brew up many a bother, The Jealousies, Line 773
 
ELD...............2
'Mong shepherds gone in eld , whose looks increas'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 358
O they had all been sav'd but crazed eld Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 661
 
ELDEST............2
And mid-May's eldest child, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 48
I'll give no garter to his eldest son; The Jealousies, Line 155
 
ELECT.............3
How to consummate all. The youth elect Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 710
To pray for mercy on th' elect , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 39
Hard for the non- elect to understand. Lamia, Part II, Line 6
 
ELECTRAL..........1
With an electral changing misery The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 246
 
ELEGANCE..........4
A man of elegance , and stature tall: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 112
And with these airs come forms of elegance Sleep and Poetry, Line 331
White temples, of exactest elegance , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 64
And as his style is of strange elegance , The Jealousies, Line 632
 
ELEGANT...........1
In elegant , pure, and aerial minds. To Some Ladies, Line 28
 
ELEGANTLY.........2
So elegantly o'er the waters' brim Calidore: A Fragment, Line 11
With him who elegantly chats, and talks- To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 43
 
ELEMENT...........6
An element filling the space between; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 301
Of that fine element that visions, dreams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 748
Thou madest Pluto bear thin element ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 99
Proving upon this element , dismay'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 617
Dungeon'd in opaque element , to keep Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 23
Of element , earth, water, air, and fire,- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 140
 
ELEMENTAL.........1
Vanish'd in elemental passion. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 375
 
ELEMENTS..........5
Thy loveliness in dismal elements ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 312
To watch the abysm-birth of elements . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 28
Of elements ! Eternally before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 945
Against all elements , against the tie Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 640
Makes this alarum in the elements , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 105
 
ELEPHANT..........2
And elephant , and eagle, and huge jaw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 135
Sighing, an elephant appear'd and bow'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 537
 
ELEPHANTS.........3
Like herded elephants ; nor felt, nor prest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 289
With Asian elephants : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 242
Shed from the broadest of her elephants . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 63
 
ELF...............8
Which every elf and fay had come to see: To George Felton Mathew, Line 28
A mad-pursuing of the fog-born elf , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 277
Who would not be so prison'd? but, fond elf , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 461
From her dead eyes; and many a curious elf , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 453
Thus much I know, that, a poor witless elf , Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 11
As if a Naiad, like a meddling elf , On Fame ("How fever'd is the man"), Line 7
As she is fam'd to do, deceiving elf . Ode to a Nightingale, Line 74
She seem'd, at once, some penanced lady elf , Lamia, Part I, Line 55
 
ELFIN.............4
But Elfin -Poet, 'tis impossible Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 5
Hark! 'tis an elfin -storm from faery land, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 343
She took me to her elfin grot, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 29
To change; her elfin blood in madness ran, Lamia, Part I, Line 147
 
ELFINAN...........9
Of Emperor Elfinan ; famed ev'rywhere The Jealousies, Line 4
Before her marriage with great Elfinan ; The Jealousies, Line 111
Poor Elfinan is very ill at ease- The Jealousies, Line 121
Poor Elfinan ! whose cruel fate was such, The Jealousies, Line 125
Imperial Elfinan , go hang thyself or drown! The Jealousies, Line 144
"A simple boon!" said Elfinan , "thou may'st The Jealousies, Line 364
Elfinan snatch'd it with a sudden jerk, The Jealousies, Line 444
Cried Elfinan , and closed the window-blind; The Jealousies, Line 597
Then Elfinan swift vaulted from the floor, The Jealousies, Line 604
 
ELFINAN'S.........2
He's Elfinan's great state-spy militant, The Jealousies, Line 52
Elfinan's back was turn'd, but, ne'ertheless, The Jealousies, Line 335
 
ELIXIR............2
Or bright elixir peerless I had drunk, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 119
No Asian poppy, nor elixir fine The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 47
 
ELM...............3
Riding the springy branches of an elm . Sleep and Poetry, Line 95
And the black- elm tops 'mong the freezing stars, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 3
Where sycamores and elm trees tall, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 44
 
ELOPE.............1
Spenserian vowels that elope with ease, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 56
 
ELOQUENCE.........5
Her eloquence did breathe away the curse: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 412
Paining with eloquence her balmy side; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 205
We have no eloquence to colour justly Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 128
Any diviner eloquence ,- woo her ears Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
His rosy eloquence , and thus inquired: Lamia, Part I, Line 82
 
ELOQUENT..........3
Of fair-hair'd Milton's eloquent distress, Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there, Line 11
O eloquent and famed Boccaccio! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 145
Lycius to all made eloquent reply, Lamia, Part I, Line 340
 
ELSE..............24
As to my sonnets, though none else should heed them, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 117
With many else which I have never known. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 48
It has a glory, and nought else can share it: Sleep and Poetry, Line 24
Whose else ? In this who touch thy vesture's hem? To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 10
Aught else , aught nearer heaven, than such tears? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 474
Nor with aught else can our souls interknit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 812
Or else he would forget his mortal nature. Four seasons fill the measure of the year, Line 14
Portion'd us - happy days, or else to die; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 332
To see what else the moon alone can shew; Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 32
Follow me, child, or else these stones will be thy bier." The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 108
And so live ever - or else swoon to death. Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 14
And many else were free to roam abroad, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 31
Upon his elbow rais'd, all prostrate else , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 65
And many else whose names may not be told. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 81
Before our lips knew else but solemn sounds; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 340
And nothing else saw all day long, La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 22
Then grant me loving pardon,- but not else ,- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 110
Good gods! not else , in any way, my liege! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 111
The marriage;- what else can I mean? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 56b
Spare, spare me, my lord; I swoon else . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Auranthe, Line 12b
Or else forget the purpose of the night, Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 3
All else who find a haven in the world, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 150
Let none else touch the just new-budded flower; To Fanny, Line 54
Just as it happen'd, true or else a bam! The Jealousies, Line 398
 
ELSEWHERE.........3
All which elsewhere are but half animate, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 37
Your temper elsewhere , 'mong these burly tents, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 124
Elsewhere ,- give that to him; pretend the while Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
 
ELUDES............1
Eludes death, giving death to most that dare King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 14
 
ELVES.............2
The windows as if latch'd by fays and elves - Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 50
And be liege-lord of all the Elves and Fays, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 121
 
ELYSIAN...........4
Of idleness in groves Elysian : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 177
It feels Elysian , how rich to me, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 315
Seated on Elysian lawns Bards of passion and of mirth, Line 11
Will make Elysian shades not too fair, too divine. Lamia, Part II, Line 212
 
ELYSIUM...........10
Will be elysium - an eternal book Sleep and Poetry, Line 64
Into Elysium ; vieing to rehearse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 372
Whilst they did sleep in love's elysium . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 823
How can we part? Elysium ! who art thou? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 753
The range of flower'd Elysium . Thus did fall Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 428
When we shall meet in pure elysium . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 658
What elysium have ye known, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 2
What elysium have ye known, Lines on the Mermaid Tavern, Line 24
Into Elysium !- now I follow thee, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 23
Whether to faint Elysium , or where Lamia, Part I, Line 206
 
EM'RALD...........1
And cool themselves among the em'rald tresses; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 82
 
EMBALM'D..........1
Was not embalm'd , this truth is not the less- Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 102
 
EMBALMED..........1
But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet Ode to a Nightingale, Line 43
 
EMBALMER..........1
O soft embalmer of the still midnight, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 1
 
EMBALMS...........1
Or maiden's sigh, that grief itself embalms : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 402
 
EMBARRASSMENT.....1
Until, impatient in embarrassment , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 430
 
EMBASSAGE.........1
Pass the high stars, before sweet embassage Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 34
 
EMBASSY...........2
Meantime he sent a fluttering embassy The Jealousies, Line 28
The bridal embassy had taken wing, The Jealousies, Line 128
 
EMBER.............1
And kept his weeks of Ember - You say you love; but with a voice, Line 9
 
EMBERS............1
Dying to embers from their native fire! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 366
 
EMBLAZONINGS......1
And twilight saints, and dim emblazonings , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 215
 
EMBLEM............1
That thou of love an emblem art; Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 6
 
EMBLEM'D..........1
Were emblem'd in the woof; with every shape Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 203
 
EMBLEMS...........1
Are emblems true of hapless lovers dying: To My Brother George (epistle), Line 90
 
EMBOSS'D..........1
The sway of human hand; gold vase emboss'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 126
 
EMBOSSED..........1
The embossed roof, the silent massy range The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 83
 
EMBOWER'D.........2
Embower'd sports in Cytherea's isle. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 492
Our gloom-pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 3
 
EMBOWERED.........2
A chamber, myrtle wall'd, embowered high, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 389
Chief isle of the embowered Cyclades, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 23
 
EMBRAC'D..........1
Then he embrac'd her, and his lady's hand Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 974
 
EMBRACE...........11
Some fair immortal, and that his embrace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 568
These lovers did embrace , and we must weep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 730
Enchantress! tell me by this soft embrace , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 756
We might embrace and die: voluptuous thought! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 759
Impossible - how dearly they embrace ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 802
I must embrace you with my dearest gust! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 52
Not a word more. Let me embrace my child. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 98
For an embrace , to dull the appetite Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 124
Wring hands; embrace ; and swear how lucky 'twas Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 251
Let me embrace him; let me speak to him; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 15
Tell me how I may that sweet girl embrace ,- The Jealousies, Line 484
 
EMBRACED..........1
Their arms embraced , and their pinions too; Ode to Psyche, Line 16
 
EMBRACEMENTS......1
To embracements warm as theirs makes coy excuse. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 533
 
EMBRACING.........1
[ Embracing him. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 128b
 
EMBROIDER'D.......1
My sleep had been embroider'd with dim dreams; Ode on Indolence, Line 42
 
EMBROIDERED.......1
Embroidered with many a spring peering flower? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 14
 
EMBRYO............2
embryo Welcome joy, and welcome sorrow, Epigraph
Each one himself a king in embryo , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 77
 
EMERALD...........4
It seem'd an emerald in the silver sheen Imitation of Spenser, Line 25
Which the emerald waves at your feet gladly threw. To Some Ladies, Line 24
Into the vaulted, boundless emerald . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 812
Of emerald deep: yet not exalt alone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 863
 
EMERG'D...........1
When at my feet emerg'd an old man's hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 669
 
EMERGE............1
And lo! from opening clouds, I saw emerge Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 591
 
EMERGED...........1
So, I am safe emerged from these broils! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 1
 
EMINENCE..........3
Yet, can I not to starry eminence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 777
And when they reach'd the throned eminence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 895
To where he towered on his eminence . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 386
 
EMMA..............2
O come, dearest Emma ! the rose is full blown, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 1
There, beauteous Emma , I'll sit at thy feet, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 11
 
EMOTION...........1
It had not created a warmer emotion To Some Ladies, Line 21
 
EMPEROR...........40
Yes, moonlight Emperor ! felicity Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 776
In ancient days by emperor and clown: Ode to a Nightingale, Line 64
OTHO THE GREAT, Emperor of Germany Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 1
Against the Emperor had suborn'd his son,- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 38
Sparkle with healthy fevers,- the Emperor Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 86
We shall soon see him,- for the Emperor , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 105
Huzza! Huzza! Long live the Emperor ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Voices without, Line 83
Thank you, fair lady - Otho!- Emperor ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 118
The stage-play emperor to entrap applause, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 144
My Emperor , is ample recompense Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 180
The Emperor must not know it, Sigifred. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 6
From our great Emperor ; to you, I doubt not, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Sigifred, Line 123
Truth is, the Emperor would fain dismiss Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 16
Great honour to the Prince! The Emperor , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 18
To tell the Emperor you will haste to him? Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 54
made at parting, and I will forget to send the Emperor letters Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 56
The Emperor will see it. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 79a
By Europe's throned Emperor , to see Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 21
But then to wrong the generous Emperor Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 28
The Emperor on this marriage is so hot, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 48
They hold the Emperor in admiration. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Second Lady, Line 16
Nothing? Her burst heart nothing? Emperor ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 121
More of this brawling. That the Emperor Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 262
The Emperor , with cross'd arms, in thought. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Sigifred, Line 277b
Cringe to the Emperor , entertain the lords, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 69
An innocent lady, gull an emperor , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 165
To-morrow, when the Emperor sends Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 174b
With the sad Emperor they are closeted; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 10
I will! Who hinders me? Who's Emperor ? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 16
Of Emperor Elfinan; famed ev'rywhere The Jealousies, Line 4
The Emperor , empierced with the sharp sting The Jealousies, Line 130
Am I an Emperor ? Do I wear a crown? The Jealousies, Line 143
The Emperor is now in a huge rage,- The Jealousies, Line 318
Than the Emperor when he play'd on his Man-Tiger-Organ. The Jealousies, Line 342
All Berthas!" sighed the Emperor . "I engage," The Jealousies, Line 373
To such a depth!" The Emperor took his robe, The Jealousies, Line 410
Your voice low," said the Emperor , "and steep The Jealousies, Line 428
Great Emperor ! to adventure, like a lover true." The Jealousies, Line 486
Exclaim'd the Emperor ; "When I return, The Jealousies, Line 528
Then the great Emperor full graceful set The Jealousies, Line 566
 
EMPEROR'S.........14
The Emperor's pardon, Ludolph kept aloof, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 101
Have fallen full frequent from our Emperor's lips, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, Line 127
The Emperor's anxious wishes- Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 129a
O for a voice to reach the Emperor's ears! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 6
And much in the Emperor's favor. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 17a
Any compassion for that Emperor's niece, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 46
Erminia! I am she,- the Emperor's niece! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 93
In the Emperor's name, I here demand of you Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 128
Look at the Emperor's brow upon me bent! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 62
Against the Emperor's wedding;- and, sir, this The Jealousies, Line 284
And breathe themselves at th' Emperor's chamber door, The Jealousies, Line 323
Comes from a play-thing of the Emperor's choice, The Jealousies, Line 332
Knowing the Emperor's moody bitterness; The Jealousies, Line 338
"The Emperor's horrid bad; yes, that's my cue!" The Jealousies, Line 622
 
EMPERY............2
Of something more, more than her empery Lamia, Part II, Line 36
Among the fresh arrivals in our empery . The Jealousies, Line 189
 
EMPHASIS..........1
For still, with Delphic emphasis , she spann'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 499
 
EMPHATIC..........1
Of happy changes in emphatic dreams, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 414
 
EMPIERCED.........1
The Emperor, empierced with the sharp sting The Jealousies, Line 130
 
EMPIRE............8
A gentle empire o'er fraternal souls. To My Brothers, Line 4
A dusky empire and its diadems; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 224
For dainty toying. Cupid, empire -sure, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 931
For scenes like this: an empire stern hast thou; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 960
Of all my lucent empire ? It is left Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 239
To all my empire : farewell sad I took, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 239
Now all my empire , barter'd for one feast, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 31
Of a wide empire , like a glowing moon; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 80
 
EMPIRE'S..........2
I should have perish'd in our empire's wreck; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 50
To prop my empire's dome. Conrad, in thee Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 161
 
EMPIRES...........1
Than the death-day of empires . Fearfully Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 34
 
EMPLOY............2
And onward went upon his high employ , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 783
'Tis false, I say. What! can you not employ Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 123
 
EMPLOY'D..........2
Who with combined powers, their wits employ'd To George Felton Mathew, Line 6
In husband's company, but still employ'd The Jealousies, Line 113
 
EMPLOYMENT........1
Stretch'd on the grass at my best lov'd employment To My Brother George (epistle), Line 120
 
EMPRESS...........5
To Empress Dian, for a hunting spear; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 703
THE EMPRESS MAUD, or MATILDA King Stephen 6
The Empress greets- King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 9d
God save the Empress . King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 19a
With clamourous trumpets. To the Empress bear King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Glocester, Line 53
 
EMPRISON..........1
Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave, Ode on Melancholy, Line 19
 
EMPRISON'D........1
Emprison'd in black, purgatorial rails: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 15
 
EMPTIED...........10
And from a basket emptied to the rout Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 510
And emptied on't a black dull-gurgling phial: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 515
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 59
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains Ode to a Nightingale, Line 3
Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 37
If my domains were emptied of these folk, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 67
With emptied caskets, and her train upheld Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 86
Thrice emptied could pour forth, at banqueting The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 36
Is emptied of thine hoary majesty. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 361
Still emptied , at meet distance, here and there, The Jealousies, Line 743
 
EMPTY.............16
Stood stupefied with my own empty folly, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 961
His empty arms together, hung his head, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 858
His wand against the empty air times nine.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 753
Empty of all misfortune? Do the brooks Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 128
Are empty left? Who, who away would be Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 565
Thrumming on an empty can Robin Hood, Line 26
Porphyro gazed upon her empty dress, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 245
With a huge empty flaggon by his side: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 364
O that the earth were empty , as when Cain Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 1
Empty these armouries, these treasuries, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 154
The chamber's empty ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 127b
The ever-smitten Hermes empty left Lamia, Part I, Line 7
Empty of immortality and bliss! Lamia, Part I, Line 278
Empty the haunted air, and gnomed mine- Lamia, Part II, Line 236
And Lycius' arms were empty of delight, Lamia, Part II, Line 307
For empty shells were scattered on the grass, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 32
 
EMPURPLE..........1
Empurple fresh the melancholy blood: Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 182
 
EMPURPLED.........1
By the blear-eyed nations in empurpled vests, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 11
 
EMPYREAL..........1
Would at high Jove's empyreal footstool win Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 378
 
EMPYREAN..........2
Lispings empyrean will I sometime teach Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 819
Of the empyrean I have drunk my fill. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 857
 
EMULATE...........1
For the sun's purple couch; to emulate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 365
 
EMULOUSLY.........1
And fluttering ensigns emulously craved The Jealousies, Line 734


Published @ RC

March 2005