En-Es - An Electronic Concordance to Keats's Poetry

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Keats Concordance
 
ENAMOUR'D.........1
I sat a weeping: what enamour'd bride, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 189
 
ENCAMPS...........1
Thus breath'd he to himself: "Whoso encamps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 142
 
ENCELADUS.........3
Shadow'd Enceladus ; once tame and mild Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 66
Of huge Enceladus swallow'd it in wrath: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 304
But fierce Enceladus sent forth his eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 382
 
ENCELADUS'S.......2
But that he met Enceladus's eye, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 107
All eyes were on Enceladus's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 346
 
ENCHANTED.........10
Culling enchanted flowers; and he flew Written on the Day That Mr. Leigh Hunt Left Prison, Line 10
Sweet as blue heavens o'er enchanted isles. Calidore: A Fragment, Line 151
When these enchanted portals open wide, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 33
Of awfuller shade, or an enchanted grot, Sleep and Poetry, Line 76
In a long whispering birth enchanted grew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 346
And pebbles blue from deep enchanted wells. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 696
You know the Enchanted Castle - it doth stand Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 26
His beasts to trouble the enchanted spring: Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 64
Ulysses stormed, and his enchanted belt Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 11
Enchanted has it been the Lord knows where. Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 18
 
ENCHANTER.........1
Alpheus! thou enchanter ! every sense Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 965
 
ENCHANTER'S.......1
Sign of the enchanter's death; Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 62
 
ENCHANTING........2
The enchanting tale - the tale of pleasing woe. To Lord Byron, Line 14
Would never make a lay of mine enchanting , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 16
 
ENCHANTINGLY......1
Dusketha, so enchantingly Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 72
 
ENCHANTMENT.......8
Enchantment softly breathe, and tremblingly expire. Ode to Apollo, Line 35
Of silvery enchantment !- who, upfurl'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 461
The enchantment that afterwards befel? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 573
Yes, thrice have I this fair enchantment seen; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 918
They gaz'd upon Endymion. Enchantment Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 796
And pale enchantment held her sleepy-eyed. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 169
There came enchantment with the shifting wind, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 276
And dumb enchantment . Who alive can say The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 11
 
ENCHANTMENTS......2
At these enchantments , and yet many more, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 428
Tears, at the thought of those enchantments cold, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 134
 
ENCHANTRESS.......3
Thou art an enchantress too, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 66
Enchantress ! tell me by this soft embrace, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 756
Cruel enchantress ! So above the water Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 413
 
ENCHASED..........1
Against the enchased crocodile, or leaps Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 714
 
ENCLOSE...........1
Sudden a poplar's height, and 'gan to enclose Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 607
 
ENCLOUDED.........1
Then old songs waken from enclouded tombs; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 787
 
ENCOUNTER.........1
I will encounter his thwart spleen myself, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 91
 
ENCOURAG'D........1
Encourag'd by the sooth voice of the shade, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 155
 
END...............28
And thorns of life; forgetting the great end Sleep and Poetry, Line 245
A noble end , are thirsty every hour. Sleep and Poetry, Line 283
The end and aim of Poesy. 'Tis clear Sleep and Poetry, Line 293
Be all about me when I make an end . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 57
The hillock turf, and caught the latter end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 323
At which we start and fret; till in the end , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 809
So anxious for the end , he scarcely wastes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 353
The diamond path? And does it indeed end Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 652
By thee were fashion'd to the self-same end ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 161
And puff from the tail's end to stifled throat: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 526
For thou hast brought their promise to an end . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 688
I move to the end in lowliness of heart.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 29
Some fearful end must be: where, where is it? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 478
The Lion's mane's on end : the Bear how fierce! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 596
And the green bud's as long as the spike end . For there's Bishop's Teign, Line 36
And you the end will see. All gentle folks who owe a grudge, Line 16
They were my pleasures, they my sad life's end ; Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 11
End of Canto xii / Canto the xiii When they were come unto the Faery's court, Bet. 74 and 75
Thou art not the beginning nor the end . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 190
The limbo of a wanton. This the end Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 8
Was't to this end I louted and became Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 17
Pray heaven it end not in apoplexy! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 49
Does't end in this? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 158b
You would not hear the end of. At nightfall Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 170
Silent,- without revenge,- pshaw!- bitter end ,- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 21
O, Fortune, where will this end ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 99b
Can put no end to; deathwards progressing The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 260
Will end in St. Mark's eve;- you must away, The Jealousies, Line 503
 
ENDANGER..........1
Endanger not yourself so uselessly. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 90
 
ENDEAR'D..........1
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 13
 
ENDEARING.........2
And draw a soft endearing smile, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 23
He said: "I feel this thine endearing love Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 466
 
ENDEARS...........1
Bereft of all that now my life endears ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 75
 
ENDEAVOUR.........5
Seems all this poor endeavour after fame, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 847
O, what a mad endeavour Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 6
With dumb endeavour sweetly! 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 47
Sweetly, with dumb endeavour , 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 52
We must endeavour how to ease and slacken Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 25
 
ENDEAVOURING......1
In murmurs, which his first- endeavouring tongue Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 171
 
ENDED.............3
That is to crown our name when life is ended . Sleep and Poetry, Line 36
Thus ended he, and both Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 710b
So ended Saturn; and the God of the Sea, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 167
 
ENDING............7
Thank'd heaven that his joy was never ending ; Calidore: A Fragment, Line 104
And as it reaches each delicious ending , On Leaving Some Friends at an Early Hour, Line 10
Of a fresh woodland alley, never ending ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 20
Thus ending , on the shrine he heap'd a spire Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 223
Thus ending loudly, as he would o'erleap Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 333
High Muses! let him hurry to the ending . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 940
Of columns north and south, ending in mist The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 84
 
ENDLESS...........8
An endless fountain of immortal drink, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 23
The endless sleep of this new-born Adon', Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 554
For endless pleasure, by some coward blushes: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 788
Aye, by that kiss, I vow an endless bliss, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 807
Against an endless storm. Moreover too, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 883
Thee into endless heaven. Awake! awake! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1027
The lover's endless minutes slowly pass'd; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 182
This marriage be the bond of endless peace! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 153
 
ENDOWS............2
Where every zephyr-sigh pouts, and endows Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 376
Wherewith the seasonable month endows Ode to a Nightingale, Line 44
 
ENDS..............3
Nor move, till ends the lofty strain, Ode to Apollo, Line 21
Thee safely through these wonders for sweet ends . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 575
That sullen ferment, which for wondrous ends Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 193
 
ENDUED............2
Thus spake he, and that moment felt endued Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 707
And the Promethean clay by thief endued , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 955
 
ENDUR'D...........1
Of happy times, when all he had endur'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 591
 
ENDURE............4
My restless spirit never could endure Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 854
Have I been able to endure that voice? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 299
Peona of the woods!- Can she endure - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 801
And to be so awaked I'll not endure . Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 24
 
ENDYMION..........48
To search for thee, divine Endymion ! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 192
And gave meek Cynthia her Endymion . I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 204
Will trace the story of Endymion . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 35
Why should our young Endymion pine away! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 184
Endymion too, without a forest peer, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 190
Great bounty from Endymion our lord. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 219
Where sat Endymion and the aged priest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 357
Endymion : yet hourly had he striven Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 395
Endymion was calm'd to life again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 464
Endymion look'd at her, and press'd her hand, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 516
Handfuls of daisies." - " Endymion , how strange! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 632
With sighs, and an alas!- Endymion ! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 736
' Endymion ! the cave is secreter Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 965
Endymion sought around, and shook each bed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 94
And now 'tis done to thee, Endymion . Hence Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 439
Endymion feels it, and no more controls Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 545
Endymion ! one day thou wilt be blest: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 573
Endymion ! dearest! Ah, unhappy me! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 762
Endymion : woe! woe! is grief contain'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 823
Endymion awoke, that grief of hers Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 855
Endymion sat down, and 'gan to ponder Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 886
Endymion follow'd - for it seem'd that one Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 927
To find Endymion . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 102a
Thou art the man!" Endymion started back Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 255
"Then," cried the young Endymion , overjoy'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 712
And bound it round Endymion : then struck Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 752
Endymion from Glaucus stood apart, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 773
Endymion , with quick hand, the charm applied- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 781
They gaz'd upon Endymion . Enchantment Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 796
" Endymion ! Ah! still wandering in the bands Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 903
Thus the fair goddess: while Endymion Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 922
Around giddy Endymion ; seeing he Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1006
Dearest Endymion ! my entire love! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1022
Endymion to heaven's airy dome Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 38
"Dear lady," said Endymion , "'tis past: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 137
Endymion could not speak, but gazed on her; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 293
Woe! Woe to that Endymion ! Where is he?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 321
Endymion sleepeth and the lady fair. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 404
Felt not more tongue-tied than Endymion . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 444
Her dawning love-look rapt Endymion blesses Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 463
Endymion heard not: down his steed him bore, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 612
Me, dear Endymion , were I to weave Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 749
Endymion ! unhappy! it nigh grieves Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 770
Endymion , weep not so! Why shouldst thou pine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 805
Pan's holy priest for young Endymion calls; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 815
To lure - Endymion , dear brother, say Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 845
Endymion said: "Are not our fates all cast? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 901
Endymion !" said Peona, "we are here! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 972
 
ENDYMION'S........6
Endymion's spirit melt away and thaw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 501
Follow'd by glad Endymion's clasped hands: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 65
Hereat, she vanished from Endymion's gaze, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 131
In lone Endymion's ear, now he has raught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 282
Could lift Endymion's head, or he had view'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 557
To Endymion's amaze: "By Cupid's dove, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 979
 
ENEMIES...........3
And purge the ether of our enemies ; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 328
And seen her enemies havock'd at her feet. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 23
Where are my enemies ? Here, close at hand, King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, Stephen, Line 4
 
ENEMY.............8
Some enemy : far forth his bow is bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 598
At one pernicious charge of the enemy , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 66
For, as I hear, the wily enemy , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 134
You are my enemy , I dare here swear Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
And kept in thraldom by our enemy , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 194
Or that the sword of some brave enemy Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 3
The enemy King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, First Knight, Line 12b
No matter! 'Tis a gallant enemy ; King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, Stephen, Line 16
 
ENEMY'S...........2
Hast thou a sword that thine enemy's smart is? On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 10
Triumphant in the enemy's shatter'd rhomb; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 55
 
ENERGIES..........1
The tight-wound energies of his despair, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 26
 
ENFEEBLED.........1
Doom'd with enfeebled carcase to outstretch Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 690
 
ENFOLD............1
That doth enfold and touch thee all about, Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 5
 
ENFORC'D..........1
That it enforc'd me to bid sad farewell Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 238
 
ENFORCED..........1
Enforced , at the last by ocean's foam Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 607
 
ENFORCEMENT.......1
By sweet enforcement and remembrance dear, Ode to Psyche, Line 2
 
ENFRANCHISEMENT...1
For great enfranchisement . O weep no more; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 299
 
ENGAGE............1
All Berthas!" sighed the Emperor. "I engage ," The Jealousies, Line 373
 
ENGENDER'D........1
Behind a barrier of engender'd guilt! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 95
 
ENGENDERED........1
And sky- engendered , Son of Mysteries Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 310
 
ENGENDERING.......1
And with it Light, and Light, engendering Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 195
 
ENGENDERS.........1
Than the mere nothing that engenders them! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 756
 
ENGINE............1
How we can war, how engine our great wrath! Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 161
 
ENGLAND...........5
Happy is England ! I could be content Happy is England! I could be content, Line 1
Happy is England , sweet her artless daughters; Happy is England! I could be content, Line 9
For Greece and England . While astonishment Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 254
While yet our England was a wolfish den; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 5
As in England - There was a naughty boy, Line 111
 
ENGLAND'S.........1
With England's happiness proclaim Europa's liberty. On Peace, Line 9
 
ENGLISH...........4
to the honour of English literature. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Some English that might strive thine ear to please. Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 4
To stead thee as a verse in English tongue, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 159
If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, If by dull rhymes our English must be chain'd, Line 1
 
ENGULPH...........1
Engulph for ever. "Stay!" he cried, "ah, stay! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 908
 
ENGULPHED.........1
Should be engulphed in the eddying wind. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 846
 
ENHANCE...........1
The tones of love our joys enhance , Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 15
 
ENHANCES..........1
Without that modest softening that enhances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 3
 
ENJOY'D...........1
For ever warm and still to be enjoy'd , Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 26
 
ENJOYING..........1
And the enjoying of the spring Fancy, Line 11
 
ENJOYMENT.........1
Of late, too, I have had much calm enjoyment , To My Brother George (epistle), Line 119
 
ENJOYMENTS........1
What my enjoyments in my youthful years, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 74
 
ENKINDLED.........1
While his enkindled eyes, with level glance Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 121
 
ENKINDLING........1
Of teeming sweets, enkindling sacred fire; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 224
 
ENLARGE...........1
Enlarge not to my hunger, or I'm caught Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 760
 
ENLIVENING........2
Thee for enlivening all the cheerful eyes Sleep and Poetry, Line 17
Odorous and enlivening ; making all Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 514
 
ENMOSSED..........1
Of thine enmossed realms: O thou, to whom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 251
 
ENNOBLED..........1
Who, to thy sacred and ennobled hearse, Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 8
 
ENNUI.............1
Writhing her little body with ennui , The Jealousies, Line 74
 
ENORMOUS..........6
Enormous chasms, where, all foam and roar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 601
Asia, born of most enormous Caf, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 53
The whole enormous matter into life. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 197
Knowledge enormous makes a God of me. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 113
A power within me of enormous ken, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 303
At an enormous figure!- stars not sure!- The Jealousies, Line 296
 
ENOUGH............32
Untill I cry out "hold, enough !" Give me women, wine, and snuff, Line 2
Enough their simple loveliness for me, Happy is England! I could be content, Line 10
Enough their whitest arms in silence clinging: Happy is England! I could be content, Line 11
Indeed, locks bright enough to make me mad; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 613
Though it be quick and sharp enough to blight Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 910
No woods were green enough , no bower divine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 151
Might seem a work of pain; so not enough Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 382
His plump white arms, and shoulders, enough white Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 213
Dusk for our loves, yet light enough to grace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 676
Is sure enough to make a mortal man Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 960
You know it well enough , where it doth seem Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 33
Is sure enough - and so "here follows prose." Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 113
Enough ! why need I further pore? O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 91
We're safe enough ; here in this arm-chair sit, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 106
What need of this? Enough , if you will be Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 31
Enough , most noble Gersa. You are free Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 130
Set my life's star! I have liv'd long enough , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 34
Brave captains, thanks! Enough Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 80b
No, no more wine; methinks you've had enough . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 39
He will be cur enough to bark at me; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 41
Than to make guesses at me. 'Tis enough . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 69
Oh! for enough life to support me on Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 1
Enough ! I hear, I hear. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 27b
Full and majestic; it is well enough , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 83
What canst thou say or do of charm enough Lamia, Part I, Line 274
Enough to catch me in but half a snare, What can I do to drive away, Line 8
Enough ! Enough! it is enough for me What can I do to drive away, Line 56
Enough! Enough ! it is enough for me What can I do to drive away, Line 56
Enough! Enough! it is enough for me What can I do to drive away, Line 56
As thou with wary speech, yet near enough , King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, Maud, Line 4
Of anger in her eyes, enough to breed The Jealousies, Line 67
His Majesty will know her temper time enough . The Jealousies, Line 702
 
ENQUIRE...........4
I would enquire somewhat of him: Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 61b
But, Ludolph, ere you go, I would enquire Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 118
Enquire of friends and kinsfolk; how they fared Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 18
His pages,- so they tell me,- to enquire Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 36
 
ENRAPTUR'D........1
While my story of love I enraptur'd repeat. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 12
 
ENRAPTURED........1
Enraptured dwells, - not daring to respire, Ode to Apollo, Line 16
 
ENRICH............3
And summer suns enrich the day, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 10
My Arab, no soft music should enrich Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 29
Mission'd her viewless servants to enrich Lamia, Part II, Line 136
 
ENRICHED..........1
Enriched from ancestral merchandize, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 106
 
ENROBE............1
Few, who with gorgeous pageantry enrobe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 36
 
ENSHADED..........2
Enshaded with thy pinions! Spirit here that reignest, Line 7
Enshaded in forgetfulness divine: Sonnet to Sleep, Line 4
 
ENSHRINE..........1
Of green or silvery bower doth enshrine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 73
 
ENSHRINED.........1
And where I have enshrined piously Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 721
 
ENSIGNS...........3
And the world's gaudy ensigns see in shreds. Why did I laugh tonight? No voice will tell, Line 12
His blood-stain'd ensigns to the victory Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 53
And fluttering ensigns emulously craved The Jealousies, Line 734
 
ENSKY'D...........1
Ensky'd ere this, but truly that I deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 772
 
ENSLAVING.........1
Before me, till from these enslaving eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 50
 
ENSNARED..........1
A muffled death, ensnared in horrid silence! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 26
 
ENTANGLE..........1
How to entangle , trammel up and snare Lamia, Part II, Line 52
 
ENTANGLEMENT......1
His head through thorny-green entanglement Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 41
 
ENTANGLEMENTS.....1
Richer entanglements , enthralments far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 798
 
ENTANGLER.........1
Silent entangler of a beauty's tresses! Sleep and Poetry, Line 15
 
ENTER.............55
The death-watch tick is stifled. Enter none Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 531
Be careful, ere ye enter in, to fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 573
Stood full blown, for the God to enter in. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 212
Enter CONRAD. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Enter AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 17
Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 124
Martial music. Enter , from the outer gate, OTHO, Nobles, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1a
[ Enter CONRAD, from the Castle, attended by two Knights and Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1b
[ Enter , from the Castle, AURANTHE, followed by Pages holding Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 12
Will't please your Highness enter , and accept Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Conrad, Line 77
Enter GERSA, in chains, and guarded. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 93
Enter ETHELBERT and six Monks. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 185
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
Enter THEODORE and GONFRID. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 125
Enter LUDOLPH and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Enter GONFRID, from the Council-room. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 17b
[Exit. Enter the Nobles from the Council-room. They cross Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
Enter OTHO and CONRAD. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 60
Enter ERMINIA. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Enter an Hungarian Captain. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D.b to Line 7
Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 26b
Enter GERSA. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 81b
Enter ETHELBERT. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 117b
[ Enter Chiefs. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 147b
Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Enter SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 32b
Enter , as from the Marriage, OTHO, LUDOLPH, AURANTHE, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
[ Enter ETHELBERT, leading in ERMINIA. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 57b
[ Enter ALBERT, and the Nobleman. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 207
[ Enter Guards. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 250
Enter GERSA and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 273
[Goes to the door, listens, and opens it. Enter ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 106
[ Enter CONRAD. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 160
Enter LUDOLPH and Page. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
[ Enter GERSA and Courtiers. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 42
[ Enter Page. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 114
Enter CONRAD and AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
Enter LUDOLPH and Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D.b to Line 16
Enter ALBERT (wounded). Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Enter LUDOLPH. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 2b
Enter AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 8a
Enter SIGIFRED, GONFRID, and THEODORE, meeting. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
Enter GERSA. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 46b
Enter GERSA. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 14
Enter LUDOLPH, followed by SIGIFRED and Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 22
[ Enter OTHO, ERMINIA, ETHELBERT, SIGIFRED, and Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 140
[The doors open. Enter Page. Several women are seen Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 187
Alarum. Enter KING STEPHEN, Knights, and Soldiers. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 1
[ Enter EARL BALDWIN, and Soldiers, as defeated. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 19b
Trumpets sounding a victory. Enter GLOCESTER, Knights, and King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Enter two Captains, severally. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 9
Enter Second Knight. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 28b
Enter STEPHEN unarm'd. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 1
Enter DE KAIMS and Knights, etc. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 14
[Trumpets. Enter the EARL OF CHESTER and Knights. King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 47
 
ENTER'D...........7
Gain'd its bright portal, enter'd , and behold! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 631
Which hurryingly they gain'd, and enter'd straight. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 725
Opened - she enter'd with her servants three. When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 72
He enter'd , but he enter'd full of wrath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 213
He enter'd, but he enter'd full of wrath; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 213
And enter'd marveling: for they knew the street, Lamia, Part II, Line 152
All down the steps; and, as we enter'd , lo! The Jealousies, Line 754
 
ENTER'DST.........1
In youth thou enter'dst on glass bottled wall. To Mrs. Reynold's Cat, Line 14
 
ENTERED...........1
Gave utterance as he entered : "Ha! I said, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 951
 
ENTERING..........1
whispering sadly, and ranging themselves; part entering and part discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
 
ENTERPRIZE........1
Would passion arm me for the enterprize : Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 4
 
ENTERS............1
He enters now! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 139b
 
ENTERTAIN.........1
Cringe to the Emperor, entertain the lords, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 69
 
ENTERTAINMENT.....1
Her household to our lack of entertainment . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 5
 
ENTHRALMENTS......1
Richer entanglements, enthralments far Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 798
 
ENTHRONED.........1
They were enthroned , in the even tide, Lamia, Part II, Line 17
 
ENTHUSIAST'S......1
Bless Cynthia's face, the enthusiast's friend: To Some Ladies, Line 4
 
ENTIC'D...........1
And every word she spake entic'd him on Lamia, Part I, Line 326
 
ENTICE............5
Another will entice me on, and on Sleep and Poetry, Line 117
My soul with under darkness; to entice Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 702
To entice her to a dive! then stealing in Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 941
I will entice this crystal rill to trace Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 699
To entice the devil to your help, that he Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 38
 
ENTICED...........1
Nothing unearthly has enticed my brain On Receiving a Laurel Crown from Leigh Hunt, Line 2
 
ENTICEMENT........1
Or by mysterious enticement draw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 268
 
ENTICING..........1
Unlawful magic, and enticing lies. Lamia, Part II, Line 286
 
ENTIRE............2
Dearest Endymion! my entire love! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1022
Half closed, and visionless entire they seem'd The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 267
 
ENTIRELY..........1
Yet not entirely ; no, thy starry sway Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 178
 
ENTOIL'D..........1
So mus'd awhile, entoil'd in woofed phantasies. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 288
 
ENTRAILS..........2
In the earth's wide entrails old Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 69
To search its sullen entrails rich with ore, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 274
 
ENTRANCE..........1
The entrance of GERSA'S Tent in the Hungarian Camp. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Setting
 
ENTRANCED.........3
Entranced vows and tears. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 827a
His wandering steps, and half- entranced laid Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 108
Stol'n to this paradise, and so entranced , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 244
 
ENTRANCEMENTS.....1
To her entrancements : hither, sleep awhile! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 704
 
ENTRAP............1
The stage-play emperor to entrap applause, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 144
 
ENTRAPP'D.........1
And who the fool? The entrapp'd , the caged fool, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 106
 
ENTRE.............1
And master is too partial, entre nous, The Jealousies, Line 299
 
ENTRENCH..........1
Should so entrench herself away from me, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 94
 
ENTRUSTED.........1
Then wherefore sully the entrusted gem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 757
 
ENTRY.............1
Each arched porch and entry low The Eve of St. Mark, Line 19
 
ENTWINE...........2
Let me entwine thee surer, surer - now Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 752
Let us entwine hoveringly - O dearth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 817
 
ENTWINING.........1
Her soft arms were entwining me, and on Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 270
 
ENVELOPE..........1
Call'd up a thousand thoughts to envelope Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 336
 
ENVENOM...........1
Of human neighbourhood envenom all. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 622
 
ENVIOUS...........3
Or shall the tree be envious of the dove Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 221
Charioting foremost in the envious race, Lamia, Part I, Line 217
Are envious which shall see your triumph pass. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, Second Captain, Line 27
 
ENVISAGE..........1
And to envisage circumstance, all calm, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 204
 
ENVY..............2
Envy , and Malice to their native sty? Addressed to Haydon, Line 12
'Tis not through envy of thy happy lot, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 5
 
ENWOMBED..........1
Behind enwombed : what high tragedy The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 277
 
ENWRAP............1
And hateful thoughts enwrap my soul in gloom; To Hope, Line 2
 
ENWREATHED........2
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 219
Through bowers of fragrant and enwreathed light, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 55
 
EOLIAN............3
Eolian magic from their lucid wombs: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 786
The lyre of his soul Eolian tun'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 866
No, nor the Eolian twang of Love's own bow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 973
 
EOLUS.............2
Old Eolus would stifle his mad spleen, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 653
Thou frownest, and old Eolus thy foe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 951
 
EPIC..............1
Shew'd me that epic was of all the king, To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 66
 
EPIGRAM...........1
The sharp, the rapier-pointed epigram ? To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 65
 
EQUAL.............3
Is an equal , be he king, Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 4
We should be almost equal . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Ludolph, Line 60a
Are equal shared, and mercy is- Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Albert, Line 45a
 
ER................1
A saint er its nativitie, The Eve of St. Mark, Line 104
 
ERE...............57
These lures I straight forget, - e'en ere I dine, Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 24
What are this world's true joys,- ere the great voice, To My Brothers, Line 13
Ere the dread thunderbolt could reach? How! Sleep and Poetry, Line 274
Ere I can have explored its widenesses. Sleep and Poetry, Line 309
Into the brain ere one can think upon it; Sleep and Poetry, Line 320
Why, you might read two sonnets, ere they reach I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 69
Nor was it long ere he had told the tale I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 179
Ere he his unseen pomp would solemnize. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 214
That 'tis their sighing, wailing ere they go Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition, Line 12
Hide in deep herbage; and ere yet the bees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 51
For many moments, ere their ears were sated Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 114
Through copse-clad vallies,- ere their death, o'ertaking Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 120
Who now, ere Phoebus mounts the firmament, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 330
But, ere it crept upon him, he had prest Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 443
Or, it may be, ere matron Night uptook Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 561
Sluggishly by, ere more contentment swept Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 916
Long time ere soft caressing sobs began Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 736
Ere long I will exalt thee to the shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 809
I wasted, ere in one extremest fit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 379
Yet ere thou leavest me in utter woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 586
And there, ere many days be overpast, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 594
She fled ere I could groan for mercy. Stung Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 601
Ere from among some rocks of glittering spar, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 819
Ere it burst open swift as fairy thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 857
Ere a lean bat could plump its wintery skin, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 377
Her silver sandals, ere deliciously Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 501
Be careful, ere ye enter in, to fill Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 573
Ensky'd ere this, but truly that I deem Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 772
Thy lute-voic'd brother will I sing ere long, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 774
What wouldst thou ere we all are laid on bier?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 973
And ere he spake a word, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 2
And ere he spake a word, Extracts from an Opera, SONG Line 6
Come down, we pray thee, ere the hot sun count Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 187
He died ere superstition's gall O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 59
Who, penitent ere he'd begun O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 75
Ere the God of Torment taught her Fancy, Line 82
And fall they must, ere a star wink thrice Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 14
And scarce three steps, ere Music's golden tongue The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 20
Whose passing-bell may ere the midnight toll; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 156
It holds the zephyr, ere it sendeth fair Character of C.B., Line 4
Thea, I feel thee ere I see thy face; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 96
Ere half this region-whisper had come down, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 349
Told of his rage, ere he thus sank and pined. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 43
Or wait the Amen ere thy poppy throws Sonnet to Sleep, Line 7
The nobles ere he sees you. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Sigifred, Line 17a
But, Ludolph, ere you go, I would enquire Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 118
Ere I sleep: Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 79b
Seconding, ere I speak it, what is now, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 49
Ere , by one grasp, this common hand is made Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 86
With wooing light upon me, ere the morn Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
Ere I met you, I sought him every where; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 131
Like a stoop'd falcon ere he takes his prey. Lamia, Part I, Line 67
Thoughtless at first, but ere eve's star appeared Lamia, Part I, Line 234
Lest she should vanish ere his lip had paid Lamia, Part I, Line 254
Ere thou canst mount up these immortal steps." The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 117
Ere I could turn, Moneta cried - "These twain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 460
And, ere one lively bead could burst and flit, The Jealousies, Line 419
 
EREBUS............1
Outblackens Erebus , and the full-cavern'd earth Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 121
 
EREMITE...........3
Thou art my heaven, and I thine eremite : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 277
Sometimes the learned eremite , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 93
Like nature's patient, sleepless eremite , Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 4
 
EREWHILE..........5
So said, his erewhile timid lips grew bold, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 69
A heaven he lost erewhile : it must - it must Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 124
Unweave a rainbow, as it erewhile made Lamia, Part II, Line 237
Into like gardens thou didst pass erewhile , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 179
To what I erewhile heard: only his lips The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 450
 
ERIC..............1
Adieu, valiant Eric ! with joy thou art crown'd; On Receiving a Curious Shell..., Line 41
 
ERIN..............1
Or by the song of Erin pierc'd and sadden'd: To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 112
 
ERMINIA...........24
ERMINIA , Niece of Otho Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 14
Than your rejection of Erminia . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 145
Enter ERMINIA . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
Lady Erminia ! are you a prisoner Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 27
sake, will be dumb as the grave. Erminia has my shame fix'd Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Albert, Line 60
Erminia ! I am she,- the Emperor's niece! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 93
Erminia ! Indeed! I've heard of her- Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 95
Twin picture to your face. Erminia ! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
I cannot. Take her. Fair Erminia , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 139
Your blessing, father! Sweet Erminia , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 145
[Enter ETHELBERT, leading in ERMINIA . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 57b
Old abbot, stand here forth. Lady Erminia , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 111
Of the Princess Erminia , your niece. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 133
Let them depart. Lady Erminia , Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 224
Ludolph! Erminia ! Proofs! O heavy day! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 92
Against Erminia . Silent? Be so still; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 139
It is no secret, that Erminia , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 98
Erminia , sir, was hidden in your tent,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 99
And the sweet lady, fair Erminia , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 8
OTHO, ERMINIA , ETHELBERT, and a Physician, discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
Erminia ; here sit by me, gentle girl; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Otho, Line 7
Do bring him to me,- and Erminia Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 111
[Enter OTHO, ERMINIA , ETHELBERT, SIGIFRED, and Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 140
What angel's voice is that? Erminia ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 168
 
ERMINIA'S.........1
Erminia's fresh puppet! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 102a
 
ERR...............2
O may dark fancies err ! they surely do; To the Nile, Line 9
All men may err . In truth I was deceived Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 45
 
ERRAND............2
On some fool's errand : let his latest groan Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 56
Incognito upon his errand sallies, The Jealousies, Line 220
 
ERROR.............1
soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph2
 
ERST..............3
Bards, that erst sublimely told Ode to Apollo, Line 3
Where oaks, that erst the Druid knew, are growing, To George Felton Mathew, Line 39
The while one hand, that erst upon his thigh Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 498
 
ERTHLY............1
might/ Rest I ne wist, for there n'as erthly wight/ [As I suppose] had more of Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
 
ESCAP'D...........4
Escap'd from dull mortality's harsh net? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 907
Escap'd ?- fled?- vanish'd? melted into air? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 24
You have escap'd me, free as the dusk air, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 31
To see herself escap'd from so sore ills, Lamia, Part I, Line 183
 
ESCAPE............8
That woodland Hyacinthus could escape Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 68
It is impossible to escape from toil Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 9
Few are there who escape these visitings- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 13
What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape ? Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 9
How? Where? The plan of your escape ? Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 179a
Into some cranny to escape my wrath? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 40
On this side of Jove's clouds, to escape the sight Lamia, Part I, Line 10
Stung my own ears - I strove hard to escape The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 127
 
ESCAPES...........1
Escapes , makes fiercer onset, the anew King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, First Captain, Line 13
 
ESCAPING..........1
He tried escaping , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 22
 
ESCORT............3
The Prince a regal escort to his camp; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 155
Command an escort to the Friedburg lines. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 150
And now the fairy escort was seen clear, The Jealousies, Line 577
 
ESE...............1
hertis ese / Sleep and Poetry, Epigraph
 
ESPECIALLY........2
And, most especially , we must keep clear Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Physician, Line 21
Eban especially , who on the floor 'gan The Jealousies, Line 339
 
ESPIAL............1
From fright of dim espial . Safe at last, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 185
 
ESPIED............1
A brooklet, scarce espied : Ode to Psyche, Line 12
 
ESPOUSE...........3
An immortality, and how espouse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 379
Tell me, my lady-queen, how to espouse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 841
An immaterial wife to espouse as heaven's boon. The Jealousies, Line 27
 
ESPY..............2
Earnestly round as wishing to espy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 112
Unless it did, though fearfully, espy Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 856
 
ESQUIRE...........1
That vulgar commoner, Esquire Biancopany? The Jealousies, Line 162
 
ESSAY'D...........1
At half-past four the morn essay'd to beam- The Jealousies, Line 708
 
ESSENCE...........12
Be but the essence of deformity, Sleep and Poetry, Line 298
Oblivion, and melt out his essence fine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 99
A fellowship with essence ; till we shine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 779
Such darling essence , wherefore may I not Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 740
On some bright essence could I lean, and lull Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 172
O sweetest essence ! sweetest of all minions! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 983
A greater love through all my essence steal." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 320
Is my eternal essence thus distraught Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 232
Stifling that puny essence in its tent. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 331
Whose hand, whose essence , what divinity Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 104
To my essence are the same; Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 77
My essence ? What serener palaces, Lamia, Part I, Line 283
 
ESSENCES..........3
Nor do we merely feel these essences Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 25
All other depths are shallow: essences , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 905
Straight homeward to their symbol- essences ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 700
 
ESTEEM............3
Though I did hold you high in my esteem Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 142
So finely I esteem you. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 60a
Talk'd of one Master Hubert, deep in her esteem . The Jealousies, Line 711
 
ESTRANGE..........1
Define their pettish limits, and estrange Lamia, Part I, Line 193


Published @ RC

March 2005