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Keats Concordance
 
ETC...............15
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 4
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 6
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 8
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 10
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 12
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 14
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 16
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 18
Huzza, etc . Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 20
CONRAD, Nobles, Knights, Ladies, etc ., etc., etc. Music. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
CONRAD, Nobles, Knights, Ladies, etc., etc ., etc. Music. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
CONRAD, Nobles, Knights, Ladies, etc., etc., etc . Music. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 1
[Exeunt Knights, Ladies, etc . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 103
back scene, guarded by two Soldiers. Lords, Ladies, Knights, Gentlemen, etc ., Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Setting
Enter DE KAIMS and Knights, etc . King Stephen Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 14
 
ETERNAL...........28
Will be elysium - an eternal book Sleep and Poetry, Line 64
Bared its eternal bosom, and the dew Sleep and Poetry, Line 190
No! by the eternal stars! or why sit here To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 5
It keeps eternal whisperings around On the Sea, Line 1
Eternal whispers, glooms, the birth, life, death Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 234
Another wish'd, mid that eternal spring, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 378
One faint eternal eventide of gems. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 225
The mighty ones who have made eternal day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 253
By our eternal hopes, to soothe, to assuage, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 1015
Can make a ladder of the eternal wind, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 26
Eternal oaths and vows they interchange, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 489
Shook with eternal palsy, I did wed Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 957
Begetters of our deep eternal theme! On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again, Line 10
Of an eternal fierce destruction, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 97
And keep our souls in one eternal pant! To J.R., Line 12
Unbosom'd so and so eternal made, Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 13
Upon rough marble diadem, that hill's eternal crown. There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 44
Hearken, thou eternal sky- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 12
Oh leave me not in this eternal woe, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 314
And watching, with eternal lids apart, Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art, Line 3
Is my eternal essence thus distraught Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 232
Diffus'd unseen throughout eternal space: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 318
Through which I wandered to eternal truth. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 187
In right thereof; for 'tis the eternal law Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 228
And their eternal calm, and all that face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 60
To that eternal domed monument. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 71
The load of this eternal quietude, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 390
Solid and black from that eternal pyre, The Jealousies, Line 665
 
ETERNALLY.........3
Eternally around a dizzy void? Sleep and Poetry, Line 177
Eternally away from thee all bloom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 591
Of elements! Eternally before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 945
 
ETERNE............2
Eterne Apollo! that thy sister fair Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 42
Open thine eyes eterne , and sphere them round Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 117
 
ETERNITIES........1
Thy life is but two dead eternities , To Ailsa Rock, Line 10
 
ETERNITY..........2
And drop like hours into eternity . To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 14
As doth eternity : Cold Pastoral! Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 45
 
ETHELBERT.........20
ETHELBERT , an Abbot Otho the Great, Dramatis Personae, 8
Enter ETHELBERT and six Monks. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 185
Pray do not prose, good Ethelbert , but speak Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 189
From Gersa's tents. Farewell, old Ethelbert . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 199
[Music. ETHELBERT raises his hands, as in benediction of Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
Not Ethelbert the monk, if he were here, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 25
Enter ETHELBERT . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 117b
I have good news to tell you, Ethelbert . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 143
Yes, Father Ethelbert , Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 147b
Ethelbert ! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 56c
[Enter ETHELBERT , leading in ERMINIA. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 57b
Ludolph, be calm. Ethelbert , peace awhile. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 103
Ludolph, old Ethelbert , be sure, comes not Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 107
Ethelbert , proceed. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 148a
Not grey-brow'd like the poisonous Ethelbert , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 81
Prince Gersa's freeing Abbot Ethelbert , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, Gonfrid, Line 7
OTHO, ERMINIA, ETHELBERT , and a Physician, discovered. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 1
I fain would see before I sleep,- and Ethelbert , Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 112
[Enter OTHO, ERMINIA, ETHELBERT , SIGIFRED, and Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 140
Good Ethelbert , shall I die in peace with you? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 172
 
ETHER.............5
Lovely the moon in ether , all alone: Calidore: A Fragment, Line 157
That falls through the clear ether silently. To one who has been long in city pent, Line 14
From the clear space of ether , to the small Sleep and Poetry, Line 168
Into the deadening ether that still charms Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 209
And purge the ether of our enemies; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 328
 
ETHEREAL..........14
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 5
Sweet Hope, ethereal balm upon me shed, To Hope, Line 29
The breezes were ethereal , and pure, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 221
But let a portion of ethereal dew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 131
Gives it a touch ethereal - a new birth: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 298
That keeps us from our homes ethereal ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 361
When some ethereal and high-favouring donor Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 437
Ethereal for pleasure; 'bove his head Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 672
Or by ethereal things that, unconfin'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 25
He blows a bugle,- an ethereal band Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 420
Ethereal , flush'd, and like a throbbing star The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 318
That scar'd away the meek ethereal Hours Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 216
Ethereal presence:- I am but a voice; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 340
That scar'd away the meek ethereal hours The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 60
 
ETHIOP............1
Shading its Ethiop berries; and woodbine, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 413
 
ETNEAN............1
When all was darkened, with Etnean throe Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 585
 
EUNUCH............1
women." Terence's Eunuch . Act 2. Sc. 4 Fill for me a brimming bowl, Epigraph
 
EUROPA'S..........1
With England's happiness proclaim Europa's liberty. On Peace, Line 9
 
EUROPE............1
Oh Europe , let not sceptred tyrants see On Peace, Line 10
 
EUROPE'S..........1
By Europe's throned Emperor, to see Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 21
 
EURYDICE..........2
When mad Eurydice is listening to't; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 165
But Orpheus-like at an Eurydice ; Lamia, Part I, Line 248
 
EV'N..............2
With a faint breath of music, which ev'n then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 115
Ah, desperate mortal! I ev'n dar'd to press Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 661
 
EV'RY.............6
And ev'ry rural bliss destroy, Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 18
Of him whose name to ev'ry heart's a solace, To George Felton Mathew, Line 68
And ev'ry passer in he frowns upon, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 65
Who raked up ev'ry fact against the dead,) The Jealousies, Line 89
Backbiting all the world in ev'ry page; The Jealousies, Line 95
Who sets down ev'ry sovereign as a zany,- The Jealousies, Line 161
 
EV'RYWHERE........1
Of Emperor Elfinan; famed ev'rywhere The Jealousies, Line 4
 
EVE...............29
The morn, the eve , the light, the shade, the flowers; Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 67
To feel the beauty of a silent eve , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 3
Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve , Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 1
Smiling at eve upon the quiet sheaves- After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 11
Daisies upon the sacred sward last eve , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 93
While every eve saw me my hair uptying Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 803
From eve to morn across the firmament. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 146
There blush'd no summer eve but I would steer Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 357
For as Apollo each eve doth devise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 463
So every eve , nay every spendthrift hour Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 465
Though he should dance from eve till peep of day- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 169
The good-night blush of eve was waning slow, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 484
"Why such a golden eve ? The breeze is sent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 927
Did last eve ask my promise to refine Spenser, a jealous honorer of thine, Line 3
Among the breakers.- 'Twas a quiet eve ; Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 89
With every eve deeper and tenderer still; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 10
St. Agnes' Eve - Ah, bitter chill it was! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 1
His was harsh penance on St. Agnes' Eve : The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 24
They told her how, upon St. Agnes' Eve , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 46
"St. Agnes! Ah! it is St. Agnes' Eve - The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 118
To see thee, Porphyro!- St. Agnes' Eve ! The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 123
Until the dusk eve left her dark The Eve of St. Mark, Line 51
When the chill rain begins at shut of eve , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 36
Late on that eve , as 'twas the night before Lamia, Part I, Line 319
"My silver planet, both of eve and morn! Lamia, Part II, Line 48
By angel tasted, or our mother Eve ; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 31
Vanish'd unseasonably at shut of eve , The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 9
Will end in St. Mark's eve ;- you must away, The Jealousies, Line 503
For on that eve alone can you the maid convey." The Jealousies, Line 504
 
EVE'S.............5
Michael in arms, and more, meek Eve's fair slenderness. To Charles Cowden Clarke, Line 59
For it sounds of Eve's sweet pippin; O blush not so! O blush not so, Line 10
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 3
Thoughtless at first, but ere eve's star appeared Lamia, Part I, Line 234
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 296
 
EVEN..............90
In melodies that even heaven fair As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 10
And even the western splendour warms Ode to Apollo, Line 9
Their youth away, and die? 'Twas even so: Sleep and Poetry, Line 219
Surprised me even from a sleepless night; Sleep and Poetry, Line 400
Even to the steep of Heliconian springs, To Haydon with a Sonnet Written on Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 7
For one short hour; no, even as the trees Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 26
Broad leaved fig trees even now foredoom Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 252
Even while they brought the burden to a close, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 307
With quivering ore: 'twas even an awful shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 352
Aye, even as dead-still as a marble man, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 405
The quick invisible strings, even though she saw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 500
Through clear and cloudy, even when she went Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 596
Yet held my recollection, even as one Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 638
All torment from my breast;- 'twas even then, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 927
Even with mealy gold the waters clear. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 91
Yes, every thing, even to the pearly cup Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 117
Yet, for him there's refreshment even in toil; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 147
Is miserable. 'Twas even so with this Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 372
Even to a moment's filling up, and fast Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 489
Me even to tears: thence, when a little eas'd, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 559
Himself on wither'd leaves, even as though Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 565
Of every shape and size, even to the bulk Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 881
Even to the trees. He rose: he grasp'd his stole, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 230
But even now most miserable old, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 303
Have mov'd, even though Amphion's harp had woo'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 461
Glaring the angry witch. O Dis, even now, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 567
Disabled age shall seize thee; and even then Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 595
His even breast: see, many steeled squares, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 731
Whisper'd the guide, stuttering with joy, " even now." Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 745
Even for common bulk, those olden three, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 848
Even in the passing of thine honey-moon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 917
That he can even dream upon it thus!- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 88
Even these words went echoing dismally Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 322
Swifter than sight was gone - even before Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 337
Even when I feel as true as innocence? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 474
Even then, that moment, at the thought of this, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 745
Not even I, for one whole month, will pry Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 824
And many, even now, their foreheads shade Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 837
Even at the simplest vassal of thy power; Lines on Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair, Line 35
Even bees, the little almsmen of spring-bowers, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 103
And greet thee morn and even in the skies." Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 336
And even remembrance of her love's delay. Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 464
And there is sullen mist; even so much Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 6
Before the earth beneath me; even such, Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 8
Even so vague is man's sight of himself. Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 9
(Here the lady took some more whiskey and was putting even more to Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line S.D.
Even so long my sleep has been secure, Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 23
To banish Even from her sky. Fancy, Line 24
Or I will, even in a moment's space, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 151
Even to Madeline's chamber, and there hide The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 164
"Ah, Porphyro!" said she, "but even now The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 307
To even song and vesper prayer. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 18
Where even the robin feels himself exil'd, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 6
Even as he spake he trotted in high glee When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 83
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 201
Even here, into my centre of repose, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 243
Stay'd in their birth, even as here 'tis told. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 295
All unrevealed even to the powers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 311
Actions of rage and passion; even as Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 333
Even as Hope upon her anchor leans, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 61
He meditated, plotted, and even now Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 69
Even to swooning, why ye, Divinities, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 152
And let the clouds of even and of morn Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 16
Even into thine own soft-conched ear: Ode to Psyche, Line 4
Yet even in these days so far retir'd Ode to Psyche, Line 40
I utter even the shadow of a hint Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 26
As Jove fans off the clouds. Even now they pass. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Gonfrid, Line 21
That even the homage of his ranged chiefs Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Captain, Line 11
Her tears from matins until even song Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 120
Even as a miser balances his coin; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 187
Do you forget that even the senseless door-posts Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 30
Good even ! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 176a
Even on the moment; so his troubled mind Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, Ethelbert, Line 33
Of even mould, felicitous and smooth; Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 65
Even as the worm doth feed upon the nut, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 158
Of the Wood-Gods, and even the very trees. Lamia, Part I, Line 34
Nor even Apollo when he sang alone, Lamia, Part I, Line 74
And thou shalt see thy sweet nymph even now." Lamia, Part I, Line 122
Even as thou vanishest so I shall die. Lamia, Part I, Line 260
They were enthroned, in the even tide, Lamia, Part II, Line 17
Even as you list invite your many guests; Lamia, Part II, Line 98
That even the dying man forgets his shroud; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 101
Even so that lofty sacrificial fire, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 102
"Who love their fellows even to the death; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 156
What bliss even in hope is there for thee? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 170
Even to the hollows of time-eaten oaks, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 408
Where even at the open doors awhile The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 466
Nor at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's even screech, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 20
Even now, while Saturn, rous'd from icy trance, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 45
Aye, even on the first of the new moon, The Jealousies, Line 26
 
EVENING...........21
And charm the ear of evening fair, Ode to Apollo, Line 46
Where the fairies are chaunting their evening hymns, O come, dearest Emma!, Line 7
Or that the evening dew had pearl'd their tresses, Calidore: A Fragment, Line 89
Returning home at evening , with an ear To one who has been long in city pent, Line 9
Who from the feathery gold of evening lean;- To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 4
Should he upon an evening ramble fare To My Brother George (epistle), Line 55
So the unnumber'd sounds that evening store; How many bards gild the lapses of time, Line 9
What next? A tuft of evening primroses, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 107
The evening weather was so bright, and clear, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 215
On a lone winter evening , when the frost On the Grasshopper and Cricket, Line 10
Through the green evening quiet in the sun, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 71
Do smile upon the evening of my days: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 115
To give at evening pale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 161
And yet the evening listens. He who saddens O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 12
This morn, my friend, and yester evening taught To J.R., Line 13
That thou should'st smile again?"- The evening came, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 350
Whose prayers for thee, each morn and evening , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 157
That call'd the folk to evening prayer. The Eve of St. Mark, Line 3
That faints into itself at evening hour: Lamia, Part I, Line 139
Now on the moth-time of that evening dim Lamia, Part I, Line 220
And in the evening tak'st a double row The Jealousies, Line 241
 
EVENING'S.........1
And, while beneath the evening's sleepy frown Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 140
 
EVENINGS..........1
And evenings steep'd in honied indolence; Ode on Indolence, Line 37
 
EVENTIDE..........3
What time thou wanderest at eventide Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 249
One faint eternal eventide of gems. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 225
That waileth every morn and eventide , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 109
 
EVENTS............2
Then the events of this wide world I'd seize Sleep and Poetry, Line 81
Names, deeds, gray legends, dire events , rebellions, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 114
 
EVERLASTING.......3
Regions of peace and everlasting love; As from the darkening gloom a silver dove, Line 5
Of the wide spheres - an everlasting tone. To Kosciusko, Line 4
And all the everlasting cataracts, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 363
 
EVERMORE..........10
At least for ever, evermore , Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 39
To where the great God lives for evermore . To Kosciusko, Line 14
We lay our hearts before thee evermore - Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 966
I must be thy sad servant evermore : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 301
The greater on the less feeds evermore :- Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 95
Hung over her sweet basil evermore , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 423
But a Poet evermore . 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 32
And, little town, thy streets for evermore Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 38
Were shut against the sunrise evermore . The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 86
And evermore thy steps go clatter-clitter; The Jealousies, Line 231
 
EVERYWHERE........1
But sooth'd as now, flash'd sudden everywhere , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 873
 
EVES..............6
Many such eves of gently whisp'ring noise To My Brothers, Line 11
Had I been used to pass my weary eves ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 546
All close they met, all eves , before the dusk Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 83
In the mid days of autumn, on their eves Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 249
The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves . Ode to a Nightingale, Line 50
With fruit the vines that round the thatch- eves run; To Autumn, Line 4
 
EVIDENCE..........3
My evidence cannot be far away; Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 161
Hungry for evidence to ruin me; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 33
Down stairs on Crafticanto's evidence ; The Jealousies, Line 789
 
EVIDENT...........1
As thou canst move about, an evident God; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 338
 
EVIL..............8
But thought no evil O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 40
As if the vanward clouds of evil days Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 39
I would not bode of evil , if I thought Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 256
O let him feel the evil he hath done; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 332
Suffering a daily death from evil tongues; Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 45
With triumph o'er that evil -witted Duke! Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 270
Wretched impediment! evil genius! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 12
As if the vanward clouds of evil days The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 341
 
EWES..............1
Sickens our fearful ewes ; and we have had Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 218
 
EXACT.............1
Exact in capitals your golden name: Give me your patience, sister, while I frame, Line 2
 
EXACTEST..........1
White temples, of exactest elegance, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 64
 
EXALT.............4
Ere long I will exalt thee to the shine Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 809
Of emerald deep: yet not exalt alone; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 863
When all great Latmos so exalt will be? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 806
Exalt amid the tapers' shine The Eve of St. Mark, Line 118
 
EXALTATION........2
From the exaltation of Apollo's bow; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 353
Of sudden exaltation : but, "Alas!" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 680
 
EXALTED...........4
Behold I find it! so exalted too! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 880
For rest divine upon exalted couch Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 192
Ever exalted at the God's approach: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 285
For rest divine upon exalted couch The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 36
 
EXAMINE...........2
And to examine it in secret place: Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 474
To examine his scrutoire, and see what's in it, The Jealousies, Line 620
 
EXCEEDEST.........1
As thou exceedest all things in thy shine, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 207
 
EXCEL.............1
And fated to excel us, as we pass Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 214
 
EXCELL'D..........1
I thought the garden-rose it far excell'd : To a Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses, Line 10
 
EXCEPT............3
Except in such a page where Theseus' spouse Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 95
Except his bridle - how get rid of that, When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 87
More thanks, good Conrad; for, except my son's, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 43
 
EXCESS............2
These toying hands and kiss their smooth excess ? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 743
Boasting he never knew excess , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 32
 
EXCESSIVE.........1
High with excessive love. "And now," thought he, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 901
 
EXCLAIM...........4
Shut her pure sorrow drops with glad exclaim , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 490
Hush! no exclaim - yet, justly mightst thou call Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 471
Exclaim , How then, was Scylla quite forgot? Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 452
Must needs exclaim that I am mad forsooth, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 105
 
EXCLAIM'D.........4
"Salpietro!" exclaim'd Hum, "is the dog there? The Jealousies, Line 311
"Pho! nonsense!" exclaim'd Hum, "now don't despair: The Jealousies, Line 458
Exclaim'd the Emperor; "When I return, The Jealousies, Line 528
"Zooks!" exclaim'd Hum, as up the sash he drew, The Jealousies, Line 542
 
EXCLAIMED.........1
"No!" exclaimed he, "why should I tarry here?" Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 295
 
EXCUSE............2
To embracements warm as theirs makes coy excuse . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 533
No, excuse me,- no! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 115b
 
EXCUSER...........1
The subtlest excuser of small faults; Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 10
 
EXECRATIONS.......1
Whose very dogs would execrations howl The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 87
 
EXECUTE...........1
What I alone will execute ! Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 151a
 
EXECUTIONER.......2
Thou art my executioner , and I feel Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 111
My honour be my executioner ,- Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 22
 
EXERCISE..........3
And buried from all godlike exercise Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 107
And buried from all godlike exercise The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 413
Save when, for healthful exercise and air, The Jealousies, Line 43
 
EXEUNT............21
[ Exeunt CONRAD and AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 144
[ Exeunt GERSA and ALBERT, with others. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 160
OTHO. Exeunt severally. The scene closes on them. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 202
[ Exeunt THEODORE and GONFRID. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 130
Exeunt Nobles. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
[ Exeunt CONRAD and SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 73
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 153
[ Exeunt Chiefs. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 151
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 153
[ Exeunt Knights, Ladies, etc. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 103
[ Exeunt OTHO and Nobles; ALBERT following. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 245a
[ Exeunt all but ALBERT. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 264
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 281
[ Exeunt Courtiers. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 45
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 139
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 32
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 60
[ Exeunt into the Castle. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE III, S.D. to Line 17
[ Exeunt . Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 61
[ Exeunt . Alarums. King Stephen Act I, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 36
[ Exeunt Glocester and forces. King Stephen Act I, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 54
 
EXHAL'D...........1
Exhal'd to Phoebus' lips, away they are gone, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 349
 
EXHALATIONS.......3
With speed of fire-tailed exhalations ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 367
Of those same fragrant exhalations bred, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 435
And spouting exhalations , diamond fires, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 46
 
EXHALED...........1
Through unknown things; till exhaled asphodel, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 663
 
EXHALES...........1
Exhales in mists to heaven. Aye, the count Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 723
 
EXHAUSTED.........1
Until exhausted of the latest drop, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 435
 
EXHAUSTLESS.......1
And plunder'd vines, teeming exhaustless , pleach'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 927
 
EXIL'D............3
Chatted with thee, and many days exil'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 926
An exil'd mortal, sounds its pleasant name! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 316
Where even the robin feels himself exil'd , When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 6
 
EXILE.............1
Than Saturn in his exile ; where I brim Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 994
 
EXILES............1
My eyes, too long poor exiles from thy face, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
 
EXIST.............2
Your chronicles no more exist , O Some Skulls in Beauley Abbey, near Inverness, Line 13
Give me the letter - it should not exist ! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 65
 
EXISTENCE.........4
To make us feel existence , and to shew Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 158
My fine existence in a golden clime. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 455
His loath'd existence through ten centuries, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 691
Its own existence , of remotest glooms. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 515
 
EXISTENCES........1
When all the fair Existences of heaven Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 337
 
EXIT..............17
[ Exit . Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Albert, S.D. to Line 158
[ Exit . Enter the Nobles from the Council-room. They cross Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 22
[ Exit CONRAD. Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 56
[ Exit . Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 22
[ Exit . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 64
[ Exit . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 65
[ Exit one of the Nobles. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 192b
[ Exit LUDOLPH. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, S.D. to Line 235
[ Exit . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D.a to Line 74
[ Exit . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 183b
[ Exit Page. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, S.D.a to Line 18b
[ Exit AURANTHE. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D. to Line 11
[ Exit CONRAD. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE I, S.D.a to Line 16
[ Exit GERSA. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 57
[ Exit SIGIFRED. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 117
[ Exit Page. Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, S.D. to Line 182
[ Exit GLOCESTER. King Stephen Act I, SCENE IV, S.D. to Line 23
 
EXPANDED..........1
Those silver wings expanded sisterly, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 296
 
EXPANSE...........1
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 5
 
EXPECTANT.........2
Expectant stand the spheres; Ode to Apollo, Line 19
So wait awhile expectant . Pr'ythee soon, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 916
 
EXPECTED..........1
This was but half expected , my good sire, Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 73
 
EXPELL'D..........1
There was a painful change, that nigh expell'd The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 300
 
EXPENCE...........1
Either in lovers, husbands, or expence . When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 58
 
EXPERIENCE........2
Women gain little from experience When they were come unto the Faery's court, Line 57
But to all here, as, by experience , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 174
 
EXPIATE...........1
I'll expiate with truth. Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 143a
 
EXPIRE............3
Bowing her head, and ready to expire : To Hope, Line 40
Enchantment softly breathe, and tremblingly expire . Ode to Apollo, Line 35
And over it a sighing voice expire . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 422
 
EXPLAIN...........3
When thou dost shed a tear: explain thy griefs Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 70
To tune our jarred spirits. I'll explain . Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Albert, Line 281
Please you explain . Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 56a
 
EXPLORE...........3
Nor with delight can I explore Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 19
Seeing so many vigilant eyes explore Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 125
With his best beard and brimstone, to explore The Jealousies, Line 287
 
EXPLORED..........1
Ere I can have explored its widenesses. Sleep and Poetry, Line 309
 
EXPLORES..........1
If he explores all forms and substances Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 699
 
EXPLORING.........1
What though while the wonders of nature exploring , To Some Ladies, Line 1
 
EXPOSE............1
He goes on to expose , with heart and soul, The Jealousies, Line 93
 
EXPOUND...........1
He will expound this riddle; he will show Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ethelbert, Line 190
 
EXPOUNDS..........1
Scans all the depths of magic, and expounds Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 697
 
EXPRESS...........2
Made of rose leaves and thistledown, express , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 571
Sylvan historian, who canst thus express Ode on a Grecian Urn, Line 3
 
EXPRESSETH........1
What his horny throat expresseth ; Where's the Poet? Show him! show him, Line 12
 
EXPRESSING........1
Is past expressing . Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 8
 
EXQUISITE.........2
Of weary days, made deeper exquisite , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 911
A full-born beauty new and exquisite ? Lamia, Part I, Line 172
 
EXTENDS...........1
Of thy dark hair that extends Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 13
 
EXTERNAL..........1
Of all external things - they saw me not, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 268
 
EXTINCT...........1
I found the stairs all dark, the lamps extinct , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Page, Line 118
 
EXTRA.............1
Call'd for an extra shawl, and gave her nurse a bite. The Jealousies, Line 648
 
EXTREME...........6
'Tis a concealment needful in extreme ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 576
Snuff at its faint extreme , and seem to tire, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 365
Me to behold thee thus in last extreme : Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 771
Give consolation in this woe extreme . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 242
In such a fine extreme ,- impossible! Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 104
Should talk of extreme unction, I shall say The Jealousies, Line 538
 
EXTREMES..........2
Of the dome pomp, reflected in extremes , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 886
Still in extremes ! No, they must not be loose. Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Otho, Line 235
 
EXTREMEST.........2
I wasted, ere in one extremest fit Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 379
That the extremest beauty of the world Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 93
 
EXUBERANT.........1
Through mossy rocks; where, 'mid exuberant green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 992
 
EXULTATION........1
E'en then my soul with exultation dances Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 7
 
EY................1
Ey and as nimble I am as brisk, Line 3
 
EYE...............92
Of all that ever charm'd romantic eye : Imitation of Spenser, Line 24
And let me see thy sparkling eye ; Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 2
How soon the film of death obscur'd that eye , Oh Chatterton! how very sad thy fate, Line 3
When no fair dreams before my "mind's eye " flit, To Hope, Line 3
The downcast eye , repentant of the pain Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 4
That they seldom meet the eye Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 28
For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye . Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 2
When the fire flashes from a warrior's eye , Specimen of an Induction to a Poem, Line 24
Scarce can his clear and nimble eye -sight follow Calidore: A Fragment, Line 13
With a warm heart, and eye prepared to scan Calidore: A Fragment, Line 29
With lips that tremble, and with glistening eye , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 91
And placid eye , young Calidore is burning Calidore: A Fragment, Line 142
And had such manly ardour in his eye , Calidore: A Fragment, Line 148
Catching the notes of Philomel,- an eye To one who has been long in city pent, Line 10
The Poet's eye can reach those golden halls, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 35
Of which no mortal eye can reach the flowers; To My Brother George (epistle), Line 44
While his proud eye looks through the film of death? To My Brother George (epistle), Line 70
Proud to behold him in his country's eye . Addressed to Haydon, Line 14
Of Jove's large eye -brow, to the tender greening Sleep and Poetry, Line 170
The very archings of her eye -lids charm Sleep and Poetry, Line 238
A coward, did my very eye -lids wink Sleep and Poetry, Line 299
Of Bacchus from his chariot, when his eye Sleep and Poetry, Line 335
There was wide wand'ring for the greediest eye , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 15
But turn your eye , and they are there again. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 80
Of upcast eye , and tender pondering! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 122
In the sun's eye , and 'gainst my temples press To a Young Lady Who Sent Me a Laurel Crown, Line 6
Fresh for the opening of the morning's eye . On Seeing the Elgin Marbles, Line 8
From out his eye , and said - "I do not deem Before he went to live with owls and bats, Line 7
zealous eye , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Preface, paragraph3
Might mark a lynx's eye , there glimmered light Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 123
Begirt with ministring looks: alway his eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 150
Of all sweet herbs that searching eye could cull: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 156
Sweeping, eye -earnestly, through almond vales: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 380
And travelling my eye , until the doors Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 581
Whose patient level peeps its crystal eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 871
For with wide eye he wonders, and smiles oft. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 63
The youth approach'd; oft turning his veil'd eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 263
Not once more did I close my happy eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 973
As if thine eye , high Poet! was not bent Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 48
Ah! surely that light peeps from Vesper's eye , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 78
This fire, like the eye of gordian snake, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 494
And of those numbers every eye was wet; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 823
Death to a human eye : for there did spring Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 875
A humid eye , and steps luxurious, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 910
But in the eye of love: there's not a sound, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 79
The lustrous passion from a falcon- eye ?- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 154
Before young Bacchus' eye -wink turning pale.- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 267
And catch the cheated eye in wide surprise, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 341
With an eye -guess towards some pleasant vale Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 396
It gave bright gladness to his lady's eye , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 724
Why does his lady smile, pleasing her eye Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 798
And I drink at my eye , Hence burgundy, claret, and port, Line 8
When in an eye thou art, alive with fate! Blue!- 'Tis the life of heaven - the domain, Line 14
Whose eye has seen the snow clouds hung in mist, O thou whose face hath felt the winter's wind, Line 2
The sun, with his great eye , Extracts from an Opera, DAISY'S SONG Line 1
Her eye -lashes may be, for ought I know, Extracts from an Opera, [fourth section] Line 4
And we will sigh in the daisy's eye Where be ye going, you Devon maid, Line 15
Lorenzo, a young palmer in Love's eye ! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 2
If Isabel's quick eye had not been wed Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 51
How could they find out in Lorenzo's eye Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 139
She ask'd her brothers, with an eye all pale, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 258
But the forgotten eye is still fast wedded to the ground- There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 21
But the stupid eye of mortal Not Aladdin magian, Line 45
I tread on them; that all my eye doth meet Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud, Line 12
Is plain, and in the eye of all mankind Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, MRS. C-, Line 7
And opposite the stedfast eye doth meet Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 51
Of eye -sight on cinque coloured potter's clay Fragment of Castle-builder, CASTLE BUILDER, Line 60
Where's the eye , however blue, Fancy, Line 72
On the river - all's still, and the night's sleepy eye Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 10
Who knelt, with joined hands and piteous eye , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 305
But his sagacious eye an inmate owns: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 366
In fragrance soft, and coolness to the eye , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 210
And sidelong fix'd her eye on Saturn's face: Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 91
But that he met Enceladus's eye , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 107
Her eye -brows thin and jet, and hollow eyes. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 115
At tender eye -dawn of aurorean love: Ode to Psyche, Line 20
And ever watchful with fatigued eye ; Ode on Indolence, Line 27
That when his person meets again your eye , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 73
His eye not downcast, and his folded arm, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Albert, Line 90
In feud with wolves and bears, when no eye saw Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE I, Albert, Line 10
And shrink away from a weak woman's eye ? Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Erminia, Line 247
My sickness, with a brother's sadden'd eye , Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 71
Of her sick eye -lids; that those eyes may glow Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
Save one, who look'd thereon with eye severe, Lamia, Part II, Line 157
Had fix'd his eye , without a twinkle or stir Lamia, Part II, Line 246
Then Lamia breath'd death breath; the sophist's eye , Lamia, Part II, Line 299
That not the quickest eye could find a grain The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 112
Of things as nimbly as the outward eye The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 305
Lifted his eye -brows, spurn'd the path beneath, The Jealousies, Line 273
Where the close eye in deep rich fur might trace The Jealousies, Line 345
Till this oracular couplet met his eye The Jealousies, Line 454
Look where we will, our bird's- eye vision meets The Jealousies, Line 732
 
EYE'S.............3
So when in youth the eye's dark glance Stay, ruby breasted warbler, stay, Line 13
And shew his little eye's anatomy. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 209
And all around each eye's sepulchral cell Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 404
 
EYEBALLS..........1
O ye who have your eyeballs vext and tir'd On the Sea, Line 9
 
EYEBROW...........1
When Kate Eyebrow keeps a coach, Extracts from an Opera, FOLLY'S SONG Line 11
 
EYEBROWS..........2
Over which thine eyebrows , leaning, Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 7
So that his frost-white eyebrows , beetling low, The Jealousies, Line 506
 
EYED..............30
O bright- eyed Hope, my morbid fancy cheer; To Hope, Line 21
Should e'er the fine- eyed maid to me be kind, To George Felton Mathew, Line 35
A black- eyed swan upon the widening stream; To George Felton Mathew, Line 87
Delicious sounds! those little bright- eyed things Calidore: A Fragment, Line 73
The large- eyed wonder, and ambitious heat Calidore: A Fragment, Line 127
Soon they awoke clear eyed : nor burnt with thirsting, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 225
Eyed them with joy from greatest to the least, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 194
Whereat, methought, the lidless- eyed train Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 598
To Amphitrite; all my clear- eyed fish, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 109
By the blear- eyed nations in empurpled vests, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 11
Speechless they eyed each other, and about Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 803
At which that dark- eyed stranger stood elate Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 977
Young Tam came up an' eyed me quick Ah! ken ye what I met the day, Line 33
Dulcet- eyed as Ceres' daughter, Fancy, Line 81
The carved angels, ever eager- eyed , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 34
And pale enchantment held her sleepy- eyed . The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 169
Which sages and keen- eyed astrologers Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 278
Came open- eyed to guess what we would speak:- Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 338
Zephyr, blue- eyed fairy, turn Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 31
Love me, blue- eyed fairy true, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 39
Adder- eyed Dusketha, speak, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 67
Blue- eyed Zephyr, of those flowers Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 96
'Mid hush'd, cool-rooted flowers, fragrant- eyed , Ode to Psyche, Line 13
And leaden- eyed despairs, Ode to a Nightingale, Line 28
Than that same quick- eyed pagan's. By the saints, Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 45
Of your keen- eyed suspicion,- she is naught! Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Otho, Line 147
A blushing fair- eyed purity? A sylph, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 23
Eyed like a peacock, and all crimson barr'd; Lamia, Part I, Line 50
The slave retreated backwards, humble- eyed , The Jealousies, Line 203
A dull- eyed Argus watching for a fare; The Jealousies, Line 249
 
EYELIDS...........16
That the bright glance from beauty's eyelids slanting To My Brother George (epistle), Line 15
The eyelids with the passing coolness play, After dark vapours have oppressed our plains, Line 7
Hid in the fringes of your eyelids white- On a Leander Which Miss Reynolds, My Kind Friend, Gave Me, Line 3
Whose eyelids curtain'd up their jewels dim, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 394
Opening his eyelids with a healthier brain, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 465
Was in his plaited brow: yet, his eyelids Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 762
Between her luscious lips and eyelids thin. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 942
Until thou liftedst up thine eyelids fine: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 152
That I may worship them? No eyelids meet Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 48
It made sad Isabella's eyelids ache, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 327
At length her constant eyelids come The Eve of St. Mark, Line 115
Kiss down his eyelids ! Was he not thy love? Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 11
She felt the warmth, her eyelids open'd bland, Lamia, Part I, Line 141
Where use had made it sweet, with eyelids closed, Lamia, Part II, Line 23
Mark how, possess'd, his lashless eyelids stretch Lamia, Part II, Line 288
Or on the open turf their soothed eyelids closed. The Jealousies, Line 693
 
EYES..............233
Sparkled his jetty eyes ; his feet did show Imitation of Spenser, Line 16
That e'er my rev'ling eyes beheld, Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 11
The beaminess of those bright eyes - Fill for me a brimming bowl, Line 15
From thy bright eyes unusual brightness shed - To Hope, Line 35
His soul looks out through renovated eyes . Ode to Apollo, Line 12
With love-looking eyes , and with voice sweetly bland. O come, dearest Emma!, Line 20
Light feet, dark violet eyes , and parted hair; Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 15
Till the fond, fixed eyes forget they stare. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 18
And o'er my eyes the trembling moisture shake. Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain, Line 42
Whose lips have trembled with a maiden's eyes . Had I a man's fair form, then might my sighs, Line 8
And thy humid eyes that dance Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 4
Blood of those whose eyes can kill. Hadst thou liv'd in days of old, Line 68
Of the wild cat's eyes , or the silvery stems Calidore: A Fragment, Line 50
Might live, and show itself to human eyes . Calidore: A Fragment, Line 121
When some melodious sorrow spells mine eyes . Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, Line 14
That fill'd the eyes of morn;- the laurel'd peers To My Brother George (sonnet), Line 3
And rubbing of white hands, and sparkling eyes : To My Brother George (epistle), Line 96
Now I direct my eyes into the west, To My Brother George (epistle), Line 139
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes On First Looking into Chapman's Homer, Line 11
Your eyes are fix'd, as in poetic sleep, To My Brothers, Line 6
What, but thee, Sleep? Soft closer of our eyes ! Sleep and Poetry, Line 11
Thee for enlivening all the cheerful eyes Sleep and Poetry, Line 17
Tipt round with silver from the sun's bright eyes . Sleep and Poetry, Line 132
Great Alfred's too, with anxious, pitying eyes , Sleep and Poetry, Line 385
His eyes from her sweet face. Most happy they! Sleep and Poetry, Line 391
Her fair eyes looking through her locks auburne. I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 106
Closer of lovely eyes to lovely dreams, I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 120
And how they kist each other's tremulous eyes : I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 146
But though her face was clear as infant's eyes , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 199
Of all the brightness that mine eyes have seen! I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 206
And turned to smile upon thy bashful eyes , I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 213
To see the brightness in each other's eyes ; I stood tip-toe upon a little hill, Line 233
Due reverence to your most sovereign eyes . To the Ladies Who Saw Me Crown'd, Line 14
With half-shut eyes and comfortable cheek, On The Story of Rimini, Line 2
Brighter has it left thine eyes Think not of it, sweet one, so, Line 13
Or the old eyes dissolving at his woe, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 400
Trembling its closed eyes and sleeked wings Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 468
From those kind eyes ,- the very home and haunt Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 472
Making me quickly veil my eyes and face: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 603
With such a paradise of lips and eyes , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 618
Of little eyes , as though thou wert to shed, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 630
My eyes at once to death: but 'twas to live, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 655
Thrown in our eyes , genders a novel sense, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 808
Warm and serene, but yet with moistened eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book I, Line 922
Those twilight eyes ? Those eyes!- my spirit fails- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 193
Those twilight eyes? Those eyes !- my spirit fails- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 193
Before mine eyes thick films and shadows float- Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 323
Rain'd violets upon his sleeping eyes . Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 427
Of diverse passion; when her lips and eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 468
Rubbing their sleepy eyes with lazy wrists, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 508
Into his eyes . Ah, miserable strife, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 529
What themselves think of it; from forth his eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 540
Of his fair eyes run liquid through their souls. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 544
Over his sullen eyes : I saw him throw Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 564
Their surly eyes brow-hidden, heavy paws Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 645
A dewy luxury was in his eyes ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 676
Is in Apollo's hand: our dazed eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 726
That breath about my eyes ? Ah, thou wilt steal Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 745
Those lips, O slippery blisses, twinkling eyes , Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 758
Over eclipsing eyes : and at the last Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book II, Line 877
Ambitious for the hallowing of thine eyes ; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 60
Their savage eyes with unaccustomed lightning. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 90
But when my eyes with thine thereon could dance: Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 150
For as he lifted up his eyes to swear Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 189
Rheum to kind eyes , a sting to humane thought, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 286
From these devoted eyes their silver store, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 434
She whisk'd against their eyes the sooty oil. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 521
My sullen steps; another 'fore my eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 605
My eyes against the heavens, and read again. Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 683
Such thousands of shut eyes in order plac'd; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 738
And made those dazzled thousands veil their eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 858
From the God's large eyes ; he smil'd delectable, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 901
Yet deign, white Queen of Beauty, thy fair eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 976
He could not bear it - shut his eyes in vain; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1008
Came quiet to his eyes ; and forest green, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book III, Line 1029
Before me, till from these enslaving eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 50
To see such lovely eyes in swimming search Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 63
With all her limbs on tremble, and her eyes Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 103
Close up its bloodshot eyes , nor see despair! Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 308
Puzzled those eyes that for the centre sought; Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 387
To mark if her dark eyes had yet discern'd Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 505
Where those eyes are the brightest far that keep Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 541
Those eyes , those passions, those supreme pearl springs, Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 718
His eyes from the dead leaves, or one small pulse Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 781
His eyes are on thee bent, as thou didst poise Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 843
His eyes went after them, until they got Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 905
His eyes abroad, to see how shadows shifted Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 921
Full golden; in her eyes a brighter day Endymion: A Poetic Romance, Book IV, Line 985
And let me call heaven's blessing on thine eyes , Extracts from an Opera, [sixth section] Line 3
There came before my eyes that wonted thread Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 2
Two witch's eyes above a cherub's mouth, Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 6
Or like a beauteous woman's large blue eyes Dear Reynolds, as last night I lay in bed, Line 53
Before the door had given her to his eyes ; Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 18
Thine eyes by gazing; but I cannot live Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 63
In blood from stinging whip;- with hollow eyes Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 110
Its eyes , though wild, were still all dewy bright Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 289
We put our eyes into a pillowy cleft, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 325
I'll visit thee for this, and kiss thine eyes , Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 335
Clearly she saw, as other eyes would know Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 363
From her dead eyes ; and many a curious elf, Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 453
O Melancholy, turn thine eyes away! Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil, Line 481
Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes , Sweet, sweet is the greeting of eyes, Line 1
My eyes are wandering, and I cannot see, This mortal body of a thousand days, Line 7
Of brother's eyes , of sister's brow, constant to every place; There is a joy in footing slow across a silent plain, Line 34
The spirit's hand to wake his eyes . Not Aladdin magian, Line 23
It cannot be! My old eyes are not true! Upon my life, Sir Nevis, I am piqu'd, BEN NEVIS, Line 28
And underneath their shadow charm'd her eyes Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies, Line 6
Seeming with bright eyes to listen. 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 4
Its eyes upon the blaze. 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 40
But my Isabel's eyes and her lips pulped with bloom. Hush, hush, tread softly, hush, hush, my dear, Line 16
Upon her closed eyes , Ah! woe is me! poor Silver-wing, Line 15
Of heaven with upward eyes for all that they desire. The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 54
She scarcely heard: her maiden eyes divine, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 57
She danc'd along with vague, regardless eyes , The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 64
All eyes be muffled, or a hundred swords The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 83
But soon his eyes grew brilliant, when she told The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 132
To follow her; with aged eyes aghast The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 184
Open thine eyes , for meek St. Agnes' sake, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 278
From such a stedfast spell his lady's eyes ; The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 287
Her blue affrayed eyes wide open shone: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 296
Her eyes were open, but she still beheld, The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 298
And those sad eyes were spiritual and clear: The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 310
There are no ears to hear, or eyes to see,- The Eve of St. Agnes, Line 348
Had taken captive her two eyes The Eve of St. Mark, Line 27
With aching neck and swimming eyes , The Eve of St. Mark, Line 55
The dragon-world of all its hundred eyes ; As Hermes once took to his feathers light, Line 5
Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed; Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 19
Why should I ope thy melancholy eyes ? Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 70
His faded eyes , and saw his kingdom gone, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 90
Open thine eyes eterne, and sphere them round Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 117
His eyes to fever out, his voice to cease. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 138
Thus brief; then with beseeching eyes she went Hyperion: A Fragment, Book I, Line 153
Its poison in the eyes of conquering Jove. Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 48
And eyes at horrid working. Nearest him Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 52
Her eye-brows thin and jet, and hollow eyes . Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 115
One avenue was shaded from thine eyes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 186
With such a glow of beauty in his eyes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 237
With hectic lips, and eyes up-looking mild, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 250
O joy! for now I see a thousand eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 323
All eyes were on Enceladus's face, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 346
But fierce Enceladus sent forth his eyes Hyperion: A Fragment, Book II, Line 382
Thus with half-shut suffused eyes he stood, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 44
Goddess! I have beheld those eyes before, Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 59
With sudden scrutiny and gloomless eyes , Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 80
And painful vile oblivion seals my eyes : Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 87
While his enkindled eyes , with level glance Hyperion: A Fragment, Book III, Line 121
And her eyes were wild. La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 16
And there I shut her wild eyes La Belle Dame sans Merci: A Ballad, Line 31
Open eyes that never daze: Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, SALAMANDER, Line 12
Lift their eyes above the bubbles, Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, BREAMA, Line 36
With my bare unlidded eyes . Song of Four Fairies: Fire, Air, Earth, and Water, DUSKETHA, Line 85
Our gloom-pleas'd eyes , embower'd from the light, Sonnet to Sleep, Line 3
In midst of this thine hymn, my willing eyes , Sonnet to Sleep, Line 6
The winged Psyche with awaken'd eyes ? Ode to Psyche, Line 6
I see, and sing, by my own eyes inspired. Ode to Psyche, Line 43
Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes , Ode to a Nightingale, Line 29
And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes . Ode on Melancholy, Line 20
Benumb'd my eyes ; my pulse grew less and less; Ode on Indolence, Line 17
Fade softly from my eyes , and be once more Ode on Indolence, Line 55
Dry your eyes - O dry your eyes! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 5
Dry your eyes - O dry your eyes ! Shed no tear - O shed no tear, Line 5
From your alert eyes and high-lifted brows. Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 18
And make the widening circlets of your eyes Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE I, Conrad, Line 85
Or my good soldiers, or their ladies' eyes , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 13
I mean a tripple-Saladin, whose eyes , Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Otho, Line 59
Of all these eyes ; pr'ythee command me hence! Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 112
Seeing so many vigilant eyes explore Otho the Great, Act I, SCENE III, Theodore, Line 125
O heavy crime! that your son's blinded eyes Otho the Great, Act II, SCENE I, Ludolph, Line 100
My eyes , too long poor exiles from thy face, Otho the Great, Act III, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 7
And thou, bright sceptre, lustrous in my eyes ,- Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Auranthe, Line 81
For I would not set eyes upon thy shame; Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 144
Talk not with eyes , but speak your curses out Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE I, Albert, Line 162
Of her sick eye-lids; that those eyes may glow Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 39
His eyes are fix'd still on the open doors, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Gersa, Line 64
No rheumed eyes , no furrowing of age, Otho the Great, Act IV, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 82
I have you! Whither wander those fair eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE II, Ludolph, Line 37
Behave as all were happy; keep your eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Gersa, Line 15
Yet could my eyes drink up intenser beams Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 42
Deep blue eyes , semi-shaded in white lids, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 61
So perfect, so divine, that our poor eyes Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 67
Those charitable eyes will thaw my heart, Otho the Great, Act V, SCENE V, Ludolph, Line 144
And for her eyes : what could such eyes do there Lamia, Part I, Line 61
And for her eyes: what could such eyes do there Lamia, Part I, Line 61
Thou beauteous wreath, with melancholy eyes , Lamia, Part I, Line 84
And by thine eyes , and by thy starry crown!" Lamia, Part I, Line 90
By the love-glances of unlovely eyes , Lamia, Part I, Line 102
She breath'd upon his eyes , and swift was seen Lamia, Part I, Line 124
So done, upon the nymph his eyes he bent Lamia, Part I, Line 134
Her eyes in torture fix'd, and anguish drear, Lamia, Part I, Line 150
His mind wrapp'd like his mantle, while her eyes Lamia, Part I, Line 242
And soon his eyes had drunk her beauty up, Lamia, Part I, Line 251
Whether my eyes can ever turn from thee! Lamia, Part I, Line 258
But rather, if her eyes could brighter be, Lamia, Part I, Line 292
With brighter eyes and slow amenity, Lamia, Part I, Line 293
And next she wonder'd how his eyes could miss Lamia, Part I, Line 310
With curl'd gray beard, sharp eyes , and smooth bald crown, Lamia, Part I, Line 364
Yourself from his quick eyes ?" Lycius replied, Lamia, Part I, Line 374
He answer'd, bending to her open eyes , Lamia, Part II, Line 46
And show to common eyes these secret bowers? Lamia, Part II, Line 149
Flush'd were their cheeks, and bright eyes double bright: Lamia, Part II, Line 214
The thyrsus, that his watching eyes may swim Lamia, Part II, Line 226
He gaz'd into her eyes , and not a jot Lamia, Part II, Line 256
"Shut, shut those juggling eyes , thou ruthless man! Lamia, Part II, Line 277
Around his demon eyes ! Corinthians, see! Lamia, Part II, Line 289
"Fool! Fool!" repeated he, while his eyes still Lamia, Part II, Line 295
Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes , Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes, Line 1
My eyes to fathom the space every way; The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 82
Thou shalt with those dull mortal eyes behold, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 247
But for her eyes I should have fled away. The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 264
What eyes are upward cast. As I had found The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 271
And twing'd with avarice strain'd out my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 273
Her planetary eyes ; and touch her voice The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 281
Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were clos'd, The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 324
Why should I ope thy melancholy eyes ? The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 370
Until old Saturn rais'd his faded eyes , The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 400
Bewailing earthly loss; nor could my eyes The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO I, Line 441
Her priestess-garments. My quick eyes ran on The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream, CANTO II, Line 53
Bright eyes , accomplish'd shape, and lang'rous waist! The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 4
Faded the sight of beauty from my eyes , The day is gone, and all its sweets are gone, Line 6
Of love, your kiss, those hands, those eyes divine, I cry your mercy - pity - love!- aye, love, Line 7
Remembrance from my eyes ? for they have seen, What can I do to drive away, Line 2
As when with ravished, aching, vassal eyes , To Fanny, Line 14
If not - may my eyes close, To Fanny, Line 55
Of anger in her eyes , enough to breed The Jealousies, Line 67
Or kiss thine eyes , or count thy locks, tress after tress?" The Jealousies, Line 171
So said, one minute's while his eyes remain'd The Jealousies, Line 172
This famed for languid eyes , and that for mirth,- The Jealousies, Line 377
The little Bertha's eyes ope on the stars serene." The Jealousies, Line 396
Whereon were broider'd tigers with black eyes , The Jealousies, Line 447
Shaded his deep green eyes , and wrinkles brown The Jealousies, Line 507
So on our flight with hungry eyes they gaze, The Jealousies, Line 722
At the open doors, with wide saluting eyes , The Jealousies, Line 758
The one he struck stone blind, the other's eyes wox dim. In after time a sage of mickle lore, Line 9
 
EYES'.............1
But I behold thine eyes' well-memoried light; Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, Line 6
 
EYESIGHT'S........1
Past the eyesight's bearing- 'Tis the "witching time of night", Line 37


About this Page

Published @ RC

March 2005